I have a motor with a brass cog on the end/How do i remove the cog and replace it? - RC Groups
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Feb 09, 2003, 03:27 PM
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I have a motor with a brass cog on the end/How do i remove the cog and replace it?


How do i remove the cog and place it on another motor?
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Feb 09, 2003, 03:46 PM
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rcav8r2's Avatar
I take it you mean the pinion.... You'll need a pinion puller. Actually I need one too.

Any ideas where to get one... HL has one for about $40... Anyother places... Even non-model orented would be fine.
Feb 09, 2003, 05:22 PM
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GWS new product micro for 1-2 mm shafts and standard for 2-3.17
shafts, uk price is 8.99 so knowing british prices you should get them for about $5.00 . so find your local GWS dealer and he should get them. also theres a small write up in QUIET & ELECTRIC FLIGHT INTERNATIONAL feb edition
Feb 09, 2003, 05:36 PM
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rcav8r2's Avatar
Shoulda mentioned.... For something in the speed 500 range.
THANKS
Feb 09, 2003, 10:39 PM
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Fred Bronk's Avatar
GWS makes the puller in 2 sizes and they retail for around $17 USD.
Feb 10, 2003, 06:25 AM
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rcav8r2's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Bronk
GWS makes the puller in 2 sizes and they retail for around $17 USD.
THANKS. I didn't know GWS made a larger one.

Do we know if this answered the original posters question?
Feb 10, 2003, 06:43 AM
Registered User
A drill press will work, if the back of the gear isn't too close to the front of the motor.

Drill a hole the size of the shaft through a soft aluminum plate which is thin enogh to slide between the gear and the front of the motor.

Saw the plate in two, so each half will slide in behind the gear to suround the shaft.

Select a drill with diameter slightly smaller than the shaft and install it upside down in the chuck, and press the gear off.

- Jube
Feb 10, 2003, 06:02 PM
Crash Test Dummy
bsumpter's Avatar
If it is a brass cog, a little heat will allow it to fall off. Not too much -- you could damage the motor.

I've used a soldering iron to get the pinion off the Piccolo tail motor, and I used a torch to remove the pinion from a GWS motor. Worked great both times.
Feb 10, 2003, 09:44 PM
Registered User
thanks guys

i tried to heat it

will try it again, but this sime hotter

thanks
Feb 10, 2003, 09:55 PM
Crash Test Dummy
bsumpter's Avatar
Please be careful. It really is easy to mess your motor up this way.

I used a fork to help pry the pinion off. The secret is to heat the brass up, but try not to let the heat get to the motor shaft. This means short bursts of heat.

Once the pinion is hotter than the shaft itself, it should expand and pry off easily with the fork.
Feb 11, 2003, 07:54 AM
Registered User
Jube,

Can you elaborate on your idea a little. A drill press only pushes down, how do you use the aluminum plate to pull up on the pinion to remove?


Grant
Feb 11, 2003, 08:28 AM
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rcav8r2's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Parkflyer
Jube,

Can you elaborate on your idea a little. A drill press only pushes down, how do you use the aluminum plate to pull up on the pinion to remove?


Grant
I'm not the original poster, but... I have an arbor press and use it for stuff like this. Just used it the other day to remove the main gear on my Corona. Don't know why I didn't think of it to remove the pinions... makes so much sense now

The plate between the pinion and motor will hold the gear, while pressing down on the shaft of the motor; allowing the motor to move down. You need to have clearance where the motor will be. By putting a drill bit in backwards you are using this to push the shaft away from the gear.
The drill press is a good idea for this as it holds the bit square to the shaft. It is not a good idea to use a drill press all the time as a press, but a few times surely won't hurt it, and I'm guessing that there won't be enough preasure here to worry about.
I may try this instead of getting a dedicated pinion puller as I have a small Arbor press and can't fit the motor and the pin.

BTW I got my arbor press at Enco. Almost always on sale for something like $15 for the small one. My buddy thought bigger would be better and ordered the next size up. It's 80 pounds and almost too big for model use.

You will be surprised at the number of things it can be used for.
Feb 11, 2003, 10:49 AM
Registered User
Quote:
A drill press only pushes down, how do you use the aluminum plate to pull up on the pinion to remove?


You support the aluminum plate from underneath.
Feb 11, 2003, 05:48 PM
Registered User
OK I'm a little anal here but I don't get it.

I have a drill press at work that has a fixed base. The upper part comes down. Now if you push down on the shaft and it is resting on a fixed base, nothing will move. The motor and shaft needs to move down and something needs to hold the pinion in one spot.

You say the aluminum plate holds the pinion in one spot while letting the motor move down. What holds the plate?

Maybe that's why I bought the GWS pinion puller, I could figure that one out!

Grant
Feb 11, 2003, 07:20 PM
Registered User
Grant,

Let the motor hang down through the hole in the drill press table,
with the plate extending over the hole.

The plate can't pass through the hole, so downward pressure will dump the notor down through the hole, leaving the pinion on top of the plate.

- Jube