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Jul 30, 2008, 01:38 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueFireIce
Thanks...Heh, just looked them up, they are cheap, cheaper than most case fans!

Also, the brushless controllers, there an easy way for setting up some kind of manual control on them?

Thee should be an easier way... Most modern brushless controllers will require you to go through an "arming sequence" in order to make the motor run.

There's "servo cycler" devices that could be adapted to operate the electronic speed controllers. But thats adding complexity to complexity.

Since you would need just a constant speed... It should be easier to design a cicuit to pulse the current through the windings in the appropriate sequence. It should sork for a low rpm (low frequency simulated AC) to have a self-starting motor.

Startup is part of the problem with brushless DC (which is actually variable frequency simulated AC... 3-phaze in the case of all the model motors and ESCs I know of)

Slapping the throttle to full from 0 can "confuse" some ESCs... but that partially has to do with the way they sense feedback from the motor.

If you just give the motor a fixed frequency of current pulses and don't bother with feedback... you should be able to get away with it since you shouldn't need more than a few hundred rpm and won't have a large load on the motor. (I think thats how they get away with the brushless DC fans in computers now)
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Jul 30, 2008, 02:26 AM
It wasn't me...
DanSavage's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueFireIce
In any case, they don't have to be used for cooling at all, just so long as they work, or give the appearance of a turbine.
You're probably better off sticking with the standard, multi-blade turbine-looking computer fans.

Most EDFs have short 3 to 5 blade impellers and do not look not like a turbines.

Or, you could try to get a hold of a JetFan. (See: The Stall Resistant JetFan)
Last edited by DanSavage; Jul 30, 2008 at 02:34 AM.
Jul 30, 2008, 08:52 AM
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by fhhuber506771
Thee should be an easier way... Most modern brushless controllers will require you to go through an "arming sequence" in order to make the motor run.

There's "servo cycler" devices that could be adapted to operate the electronic speed controllers. But thats adding complexity to complexity.

Since you would need just a constant speed... It should be easier to design a cicuit to pulse the current through the windings in the appropriate sequence. It should sork for a low rpm (low frequency simulated AC) to have a self-starting motor.

Startup is part of the problem with brushless DC (which is actually variable frequency simulated AC... 3-phaze in the case of all the model motors and ESCs I know of)

Slapping the throttle to full from 0 can "confuse" some ESCs... but that partially has to do with the way they sense feedback from the motor.

If you just give the motor a fixed frequency of current pulses and don't bother with feedback... you should be able to get away with it since you shouldn't need more than a few hundred rpm and won't have a large load on the motor. (I think thats how they get away with the brushless DC fans in computers now)
Thanks for the "servo cycler" idea. Will look into it, complexity doesn't bother me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanSavage
You're probably better off sticking with the standard, multi-blade turbine-looking computer fans.

Most EDFs have short 3 to 5 blade impellers and do not look not like a turbines.

Or, you could try to get a hold of a JetFan. (See: The Stall Resistant JetFan)
Maybe so, but I just didn't ever like the looks of the ones I bought. Even hacked some up and made custom "spinners" for them. I also kinda liked the idea of being able to spin it up to full speed for kicks and giggles.

I also didn't see anything on the site where you could buy one, but from the looks of it, it might just be one of those "electric turbos" you see being sold everywhere, never thought about hacking up one of those.
Jul 30, 2008, 12:04 PM
Carbon fiber is our friend
Steve C's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueFireIce
Don't know anything about it, and I'm not the very mysterious type...
I apologize then. We've had plenty of guys coming here trying to make turbos for cars. They jump in and want us to tell them how to do something that they plan on selling without really trying to make friends first. You can get a lot of great advise here, but it sure helps to be nice first

The other guy started on the same day as you. Maybe you're working on similar projects and can share info?

Steve C
Jul 30, 2008, 04:06 PM
It wasn't me...
DanSavage's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueFireIce
I also didn't see anything on the site where you could buy one, but from the looks of it, it might just be one of those "electric turbos" you see being sold everywhere, never thought about hacking up one of those.
That company is an engineering firm developing and licensing the technology. If you're interested, you should drop them a line to see if any of their licensees have put anything on the market. They show video of impellers being molded in a factory setting, so there's a good chance someone's already making it.

LOL! Like the one on this page? (See: New Fluid Technology)
Jul 30, 2008, 04:09 PM
It wasn't me...
DanSavage's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve C
I apologize then. We've had plenty of guys coming here trying to make turbos for cars.
LOL! Like the one below?

See: A 12 volt automotive blower that increases engine efficiency and power.

'I asked Terry Day of New Fluid Technology to design and build a 12 volt electric automotive blower for boosting performance and efficiency of engines up to 1.8 litres (and target larger engines later). Engine Dynamometer testing and installation in a Honda Prelude, among other vehicles, shows a significantly improved performance and I now believe these blowers should be installed in all cars.' Sir Jack Brabham, OBE. Jan. 15. 2008.
Jul 30, 2008, 07:31 PM
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve C
I apologize then. We've had plenty of guys coming here trying to make turbos for cars. They jump in and want us to tell them how to do something that they plan on selling without really trying to make friends first. You can get a lot of great advise here, but it sure helps to be nice first

The other guy started on the same day as you. Maybe you're working on similar projects and can share info?

Steve C
Nope, no e-turbo for me, put more than enough on the dyno to know they don't work.

I also think of my self as the friendly type, and if all goes well I will be on these forums more since I plan on getting back into r/c for a hobby, if I ever find time from work that is.

If he is working on something like this I would be glad to hear about it, as for me this project is going to take some time. I want to do it right and I don't have much time on my hands, so I am planing this one out long ahead of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanSavage
That company is an engineering firm developing and licensing the technology. If you're interested, you should drop them a line to see if any of their licensees have put anything on the market. They show video of impellers being molded in a factory setting, so there's a good chance someone's already making it.

LOL! Like the one on this page? (See: New Fluid Technology)
I will have to do just that, maybe I will get lucky and someone is selling them, will save me allot of trouble.

Yes, just like those, type in electric turbo/electric blower in to eBay or Google and you will get a ton of hits.
Sep 14, 2019, 03:58 PM
Registered User

I would try Arduino


A small Arduino nano board with some sample code can run your esc at a pre programmed "throttle". As for the turbine look, a edf just looks like a 12 blade fan inside a round housing by itself. You said try a 64mm edf for size and affordability. But use 2 maybe 3 layers of 12 blade fans, I'm not sure what that will do with your airflow, but looking down the tube at 3 layers of fans will look like a bunch of fan blades like a turbine, no gaps between the blades will look pretty close..


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