New Products Flash Sale
Thread Tools
Old May 20, 2008, 07:50 AM
guapoman2000 is offline
Find More Posts by guapoman2000
Account closed
Yippee!

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson message about Human Spaceflight


Our premiere video features Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astro Physics) as he receives the 2008 RNASA Space Communicator award. Please visit the link and watch both Parts 1 and 2. I think you will find the content awesome and highly entertaining.

I would also ask that if you do in fact, enjoy the clips, please forward the link to any- and everyone you know. We want to spread Dr. Tyson's message about human spaceflight far and wide, as we believe that this amazing, fascinating, and enthralling presentation needs to be heard by everyone.

To go directly to the Space City Films at YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/user/SpaceCityFilms



PART 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2J3mudwgz18




PART 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxZxPSad77U
Last edited by guapoman2000; May 21, 2008 at 05:26 AM.
Old May 20, 2008, 08:58 AM
metalbuggy is offline
Find More Posts by metalbuggy
"Cracking Toast Grommit!"
metalbuggy's Avatar
"We're sorry, this video is no longer available."

I'll try and find it on YouTube.




edit-got it.
Last edited by metalbuggy; May 20, 2008 at 03:01 PM.
Old May 20, 2008, 11:39 AM
tolladay is offline
Find More Posts by tolladay
fix-it-up chappie
tolladay's Avatar
Yellow link on the top of the video took me right there.

Outstanding videos. Both of them. Worth every minute of my hectic morning.

On the second video when he puts the budget for Cassini into perspective (American's spend more money per year on lip balm) it's wonderfully funny. The ending is an excellent challenge, throwing down the gauntlet, as it were, for getting us space nuts more involved.

Already sent out to family and friends.
Old May 20, 2008, 12:45 PM
aeronca is offline
Find More Posts by aeronca
The figure "9" Specialist
aeronca's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalbuggy
"We're sorry, this video is no longer available."

I'll try and find it on YouTube.






edit - couldn't find it, let me have a set of key words, that may help.
Ditto!

Aeronca
Old May 20, 2008, 12:45 PM
Bilbobaker is offline
Find More Posts by Bilbobaker
Suspended Account
Bilbobaker's Avatar
Great thread.
Thanks for posting it.
Old May 20, 2008, 12:47 PM
Bilbobaker is offline
Find More Posts by Bilbobaker
Suspended Account
Bilbobaker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by aeronca
Ditto!

Aeronca
Try clicking on the upper left yellow text link.

Works for me but, takes me to Youtube.
Old May 20, 2008, 12:54 PM
The Other Dave is offline
Find More Posts by The Other Dave
Registered User
The Other Dave's Avatar
Nice find.

And totally correct.
Old May 20, 2008, 12:57 PM
Usta Bee is offline
Find More Posts by Usta Bee
Closed Account
Quote:
....features Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astro Physics) as he receives the 2008 RNASA Space Communicator award.

.....what would you get if Carl Sagan and Jesse Jackson had a love child.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tolladay
Outstanding videos. Both of them. Worth every minute of my hectic morning.

I was multitasking peeling an orange for lunch, so yeah I watched it too as I can't type with juice on my fingers.


Quote:
Already sent out to family and friends.

Why, are they insomniacs ?.
Old May 20, 2008, 01:34 PM
Looooeeee! is offline
Find More Posts by Looooeeee!
Heli Bouncer
Looooeeee!'s Avatar
I just got through reading Oliver Morton's book Mapping Mars: Science, Imagination, and the Birth of a World.

I hate to be the hardheaded realist here, but Oliver brings up some great points that explain why we've missed the boat with our Shuttle missions.

The real outer space missions, the ones that actually escape earth gravity and go somewhere have been reduced to relying on the shuttle for initial boost up. Then they still have to find some Rube Goldberg ways of getting above low earth orbit. For now all we've done is get some robots on the planet Mars, and we've not been doing great at that aspect of it.

Morton's study of the planet has us going back a couple billions of years to when they suspect that Mars actually had some shallow, CO2 fizzy water oceans around the North polar regions. There's a lot of speculation about what happened to the water. From whether it evaporated from the low gravity, to it being locked into the crust as really deep permafrost. Mars has a pretty low density for a planet it's size, and the geologists and astrogeologists studying it have a theory that the water is still there and that the crust of Mars is porous enough to have absorbed most of it.

There are also a lot of amusing anecdotes about hanging around JPL Houston while the rover missions were underway. The triumphs and defeats, and a lot of cockeyed optimistic musings on whether terraforming Mars would be worth it.

Great book, and a subtle reminder that we've got still a long way to go before we send humans safely into deep space missions like Mars and Jupiter.
Old May 20, 2008, 02:31 PM
lrsudog is offline
Find More Posts by lrsudog
Go get them Meg!
lrsudog's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looooeeee!

Great book, and a subtle reminder that we've got still a long way to go before we send humans safely into deep space missions like Mars and Jupiter.

We can't even "safely" send people to work in their cars.

It's all about risk assessment versus benefit.
Old May 20, 2008, 02:43 PM
The Other Dave is offline
Find More Posts by The Other Dave
Registered User
The Other Dave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looooeeee!
There are also a lot of amusing anecdotes about hanging around JPL Houston while the rover missions were underway. The triumphs and defeats, and a lot of cockeyed optimistic musings on whether terraforming Mars would be worth it.

Which rover missions?
Old May 20, 2008, 02:55 PM
Looooeeee! is offline
Find More Posts by Looooeeee!
Heli Bouncer
Looooeeee!'s Avatar
Well he covered every thing from the Mariner probes, Viking landers and the present day surface landers , what,?? Discovery and such? I don't recall specific names of the landers. A few of them failed, one lost it's retro descent rockets at about 50' up and landed too hard. I still think the parachute descent with the airbag/beachball cum mattress descent module was a brilliantly conceived design.

Guess I'm going to have to read it again..
Old May 20, 2008, 02:58 PM
aeronca is offline
Find More Posts by aeronca
The figure "9" Specialist
aeronca's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilbobaker
Try clicking on the upper left yellow text link.

Works for me but, takes me to Youtube.

Thanks!

An absolutely excellent and articulate speaker!

Aeronca
Old May 20, 2008, 03:13 PM
The Other Dave is offline
Find More Posts by The Other Dave
Registered User
The Other Dave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looooeeee!
Well he covered every thing from the Mariner probes, Viking landers and the present day surface landers , what,?? Discovery and such?
Ok just wondering because the book was published before the most "modern" rovers Spirit and Opportunity and I am interested in reading more about their operational time.
Old May 20, 2008, 03:56 PM
Jeffery is offline
Find More Posts by Jeffery
And You're Not
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looooeeee!
Well he covered every thing from the Mariner probes, Viking landers and the present day surface landers , what,?? Discovery and such? I don't recall specific names of the landers. A few of them failed, one lost it's retro descent rockets at about 50' up and landed too hard. I still think the parachute descent with the airbag/beachball cum mattress descent module was a brilliantly conceived design.

Guess I'm going to have to read it again..
There's a probe, Phoenix, landing on the northern polar region of Mars this coming Sunday. It uses a parachute/retro-rocket system instead of the airbags. It's mission is to dig into the ground a couple of feet into what is hoped to be permafrost that might have preserved some of the organic compounds from when Mars had liquid water.


Thread Tools