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May 25, 2008, 02:43 PM
from another mother
Brother2's Avatar
Don't be cheap. Replace your razor blades and sandpaper often. It will save you some frustration, and it will make your model better.
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Jun 10, 2008, 04:19 AM
Yes it's a taildragger...
Baba Booey's Avatar
To keep sawdust, sanding dust ETC from getting into your fuel lines during construction, if you have a few spare fuel filters open them up and fill with paper towel. Instant dust plugs!

Note that mine are master airscrew and pull apart some may not
Jun 10, 2008, 09:14 AM
Deletedfor proving Nauga wrong
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baba Booey
To keep sawdust, sanding dust ETC from getting into your fuel lines during construction, if you have a few spare fuel filters open them up and fill with paper towel. Instant dust plugs!

Note that mine are master airscrew and pull apart some may not
Or get fuel line plugs...

Or just use short pieces of solid brass rod...

Or... use whatever else seems to work to plug the fuel lines
Jul 14, 2008, 12:14 PM
Registered User

Plan Protection


See also Great Planes Building accessories, Plan Protector Roll $*.99 (+)
at Tower Hobbies.

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXK313&P=SM

For a building board, I bought a 2' X 4' sheet of plywood, and stuck a same size ceiling tile on it, soft side up - can stick pins in it, will absorb spills, etc.
Very cheap @ Loews or Home Depot........
Wish I could say I've built a bunch, but just getting re-started.
Jul 31, 2008, 10:54 PM
Registered User
Arceenut's Avatar
Robart hinge points make excellent fuel ine plugs. Used intact they will plug both the fuel line and the pressure line and keep them together at the same time.
Aug 16, 2008, 01:15 PM
Registered User
Don't push pins through balsa sticks such as used in vertical and horizontal stabs . Instead, lay the parts on the plans (covered as indicated above ) and pin OVER the sticks in a criss-cross pattern. You use a few more pins, but you won't split the sticks!

If you are stick building, lay out both sides of the chassis at the same time, one over the other. This will result in both sides being as close to identical as possible.

These are old tricks, but if you are re-constructing vintage planes, or working with any kind of stick construction, they are good to remember!

Cheers, Jim
Aug 25, 2008, 07:04 PM
I'm a pilot, 100 yrs too late
Thermalin's Avatar
Always use a sanding block whenever possible. Use your fingers to run over the surface to find imperfections, or high spots. Think of sculpting.

Have everything at hand so you'll be more apt to use the correct tool (clamps, pins, various knife blades) and not make do with what you have which often leads to less than desireable results.

Covering won't hide imperfections in the final surface... think of painting a wall.
mv
Aug 27, 2008, 11:30 PM
Registered User

Landing gear hold-downs


Trying to fix a mildly crashed trainer - the nylon landing gear hold-downs had all ripped (GOOD THING - cheap and easier than if the screws had ripped out).

Local hobby shop did not have replacements that would fit, so I bought a cheap plastic container, of good quality ($.85), and cut my own. They worked ...... if only I could get it flying again......
Sep 07, 2008, 12:14 AM
I meant to do that
littlewing78's Avatar
Use wet wipes when building your ARF. They are the best thing for wiping off excess epoxy. Your plane will come out much cleaner looking.
Sep 07, 2008, 10:35 AM
Registered User
Xanadu's Avatar
Buy a few pieces of self sticking sandpaper used on power tools. Various grits if you want.
Stick them right to the top of your bench, or onto a board, and voila', you have a nice flat large sanding surface
Oct 09, 2008, 05:41 PM
Twistaholic AMA 134406
Dad_Roman's Avatar
I could wax poetic for hours but.....

Here is 122 Tips Sorry...these appear to be gone. The other two links are still working.

Here is a few

Here is a Library with a Wealth of Information
Last edited by Dad_Roman; Nov 24, 2013 at 04:28 PM.
Oct 29, 2008, 05:31 PM
Dweebster
dweeb7944's Avatar
For a building surface, I use Homosote. You can find it at any Homedepot or Lowes. I took it from Model Railroad building. It's pretty tough to take a beating. You can cut on it, yet are still able to stick pins into to hold plans or parts or whatever.
Nov 13, 2008, 09:44 AM
No Country for Snowflake Men
n00b-E's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by turnbub
See also Great Planes Building accessories, Plan Protector Roll $*.99 (+)
at Tower Hobbies.

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXK313&P=SM

For a building board, I bought a 2' X 4' sheet of plywood, and stuck a same size ceiling tile on it, soft side up - can stick pins in it, will absorb spills, etc.
Very cheap @ Loews or Home Depot........
Wish I could say I've built a bunch, but just getting re-started.
Ditto on the ceiling tile for a building board. I've never built a model without one, they're great!
Nov 24, 2008, 08:36 AM
Stankromfols
In addition to the other tools, I've found that someitmes a drywall knife works well. It uses razor blades, so it makes sharp smooth cuts, but it's stronger than an exacto knife.
Jan 26, 2009, 11:16 AM
wzak29
Waiting for delivery of my first plane, PT-40 from Tower Hobbies
the great thing about them is that I was abel to download
the manual so I could study it before I receive the plane.
(read it three times)


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