ICARE R/C Imports S2G ASG 29 4.8m Electrifying Scale Model - RC Groups
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ICARE R/C Imports S2G ASG 29 4.8m Electrifying Scale Model

Martin Pilko electrifies and reviews the S2G ASG 4.8m Scale glider for ICARE SAILPLANES.

S2G ASG 29 4.8 m Static Shot

Introduction

The inspiration for electrifying a 4.8 m sailplane came when I first experienced the rewards of successful electric conversion with the Part II: ICARE RC Imports Let Model ASW 28-18 3m Electrifying Scale Model. In choosing a model, I took into consideration the “size of the model airframe” (i.e. 1:3.75 scale) and overall flying weight and performance. I have electrified and successfully flown a PG Gerasis ASW 27 4m model for about 4 years,but I wanted to go bigger. I ended up browsing Icare Sailplanes’ website and noticed the new design ASG 29 4.8m.

I have learned since that the full scale ASW 27 has been re-designed yielding a new superior design called ASG 29 by Alexander-Schleicher.

S2G ASG 29 4.8 m Static View
S2G ASG 29 4.8 m Static View
Wingspan:4.835m (190")
Wing Area:87.7dm2 (1359sq.in.)
Weight:6.7 kg (237oz.)
Length:1.72m (67")
Wing Loading:76.3g/dm2 (25oz/sq.ft.)
Wing Airfoil:HQ 2.5/14/11
Servos:JRDS368 & 3421, Futaba S9202, Hitec 625MG & 85BB
Transmitter:Futaba MZ 14
Receiver:Futaba R5014DPS Syn Rx
Battery:2 packs, 4 cells 2400 mAh NiCd
Motor:Plettenberg HP220/30/A2 P4 7:1
ESC:TMM8024-3s expert+
Manufacturer: S2G (out of business)
Available From:Icare Sailplanes

Kit Contents

The kit came packed very well from Icare. Upon opening the box I was satisfied with the contents of the kit, and ll necessities were included with the exception of a retract wheel.

The kit comes with the servo tray and retract mechanism installed (the kit did not include a landing wheel or the retract doors installed but the doors did come pre-cut). The canopy requires cutting and adhering to the canopy frame. The wing came in four parts with molded winglets that attach to the wing extensions (for easy transport). The wings have 320 mm long airbrakes installed and is wing is constructed out of 5 layers (top to bottom - through the wing: obechi, fiberglass, white foam fiberglass and obechi) covered with oracover. The elevator is also foam covered with obechi and then with oracover.

Kit Includes:

  • Fiberglass fuselage
  • Clear plastic canopy and canopy tray
  • Installed retract mechanism
  • Metal wing joiner and fiberglass joiners for winglets
  • Hardware for linkage/covers
  • Installed spoilers
  • Molded wing tips
  • Stickers
  • Brief instructions

Assembly

I'm not going to go into much detail about the assembly of the model, but I will mention some points of interests. The instructions were a little difficult to understand; however, several visuals were included to make things clearer.

Wing

The grooves cut in the foam portion of the wings for guiding wire for servos were aligned well so there we no surprises. Three servos per side (total of 6 servos) were installed in the wings. The control surfaces on the wings are flaps, spoilers and ailerons. I glued the outer molded winglets to the wing extensions for easy transport and utilized piano wire and a fiberglass joiner to connect the two "halves" that make up one side of the wing (see photos). There is an option to glue the wing extensions (this way there is only a left and a right wing; however, it is more "awkward" for transport and storage in terms of my likings).

Tail

The rudder and elevator install was very straightforward. For elevator, I utilized a servo installed in a tray and glued in the top portion of the rudder. The rudder was installed using a pull-pull mechanism.

Fuselage

The below quote is taken from Part II: ICARE R/C Imports Let Model ASW 28-18 3m Electrifying Scale Model that I wrote back in September 2006.

“…The first item at hand was to cut the nose of the glider in such a way to ensure the width/height of the fuselage and the spinner would “blend in” as if it wasn’t there, when looking at the fuselage from distance. The second item was to make sure that the firewall was not too far in or not too far out (just the correct distance), thus, the transition from the spinner to the fuse is "smooth". This was achieved by cutting the firewall a bit bigger and slowly sanding it down to achieve a desired fit. For the firewall I decided to use a circuit board. Circuit board is very sturdy and really easy to work with in my opinion. The third item to keep in mind was to obtain a desired angle for the motor install. It was decided to keep the angle perfectly perpendicular with respect to the horizontal and vertical axis (I decided that I would “mix” in the elevator to obtain “angle of climb” at various throttle positions - computer radio came in really handy for this purpose). …”

When electrifying a larger scale glider, a mistake on your fuselage cut could prove very pricey. The above quote discusses the firewall (motor mount). Below, I will discuss in detail techniques in achieving a better precision cut on your fuselage prior to fitting a motor mount. For example, if more material is cut off the nose than initially planned for, or if the angle is way off in X or Y-axis or both, either live with the mistake or order a new fuselage and try again. You definitely only get one crack at it.

One way to ensure that cut off portion of the nose is more precise with regards to X-axis, T-axis and transitioning “shape” of the spinner to fuselage, is to cut the nose 1⁄2 to 3⁄4 of in inch short of desired distance. Once the cut is complete, all it takes is 100 grid sandpaper and little by little sanding of the fuselage material while keeping a close eye on three things: (1) Y-axis angle (2) X-axis angle (3) transitioning of the fuselage to spinner.

In terms of “compensation angle” for torque, as mentioned above in the quote …” it was decided to keep the angle perfectly perpendicular with respect to the horizontal and vertical axis”… In this case the angles were kept perpendicular to the natural contours of the “front shape” of the fuselage. If one takes the entire fuselage into perspective the overall appearance of the mounted motor will look slightly off - pointing upwards. Focusing on the contours of the “front shape” of the fuselage will make the transitioning contours look more natural.

Motor: Plettenberg HP220/30/A2 P4 gear 7:1
Controller: TMM8024-3s expert+
Prop Size: 16 x 8
Batteries: 6S LiPo 3700mAh, made from 2 3S packs

Max Current: 59A
Max Power: 1200 Watts
Max RPM: 8,400
Batteries under load (full power): 18.5 Volts
30 seconds of full power: Drains 500 mA

The above power set-up provides more than enough power/thrust to safely launch the model in the air and get you flying (see video link below).

Expect up to 7 full height launches with the above set-up with a model weight of 6.7 kg. The average climbed height in 30 seconds is approximately 800-1000 feet (dependant on climb angle).

There are many ways one can move around and position the electronics and wires within the fuselage. I found the best way to place my electronics as illustrated below.

Along with the electric motor install, there is no doubt that this was the most time consuming operation. The two photos below summarize the work that was required. Overall, there was sufficient space to place the gear. I chose to run two 2400 mAh NiCd packs for power system - "just in case". In addition, I'm utilizing Picolario which is helpful in providing real-time voltage reading.

Flying

Basics

In comparison to 3m and 4m model the 4.8 m model tip stall is extremely detectable and manageable. The tip stall for the ASG 29 is a mild drop in one direction and a dip. For those of you who have flown 3m scale planes, the tip stall for the ASG 29 is much pleasant to deal with than 3m. The model responds well to tip stall recovery control inputs (utilizing aileron and elevator “corrections”).

Take Off and Landing

Take off can be done with either a dolly (see video below) or the model can be safely hand launched.

I usually do not use major flap deflection when landing. My preference is to utilize camber (move the entire trailing edge on the main wing down) and slow the model down through utilization of elevator and spoilers. In fact, as soon as I get my models to altitude I switch on the camber and keep it there for the duration of the thermal flight. Larger flap deflection should be utilized if a runway is short or if the model comes in a little hotter. Once the pilot finds the “optimum/minimum speed envelope” before stalling, bringing in the sailplane for a landing should be very predictable. If the model is flying with wigs leveled, it is possible to fly the model at slower speeds. It is important to increase the speed if making a turn or banking a wing on an approach or there could be a risk of stalling the model.

Thermal Flying and Aerobatics

In my opinion this model does very well in "thermal flight" at 4.8 meters. The difference in flight characteristics and thermal "performance" is definitely noticeable when comparing to a 4 meter glider (i.e. PG Gerasis ASW 27 4m). It is true, larger scale models do fly better - they are more stable and have higher inertia.

I have not tried a loop or a roll (I did try stall turns) with the model because in my opinion the wings are a bit flexy; however, this does not mean that the model is not capable of mild aerobatics. Once I get a better feel for "flex factor of wings" I just may try some mild aerobatics.

Flight Video

Downloads

ASG 29 Flight Video  2.61 MB

Conclusion

Overall, I'm quite pleased with the electric set-up, performance and the choice of the airframe. For a 1:3.75 scale model, S2G definitely provides a good value for your buck. If I were to "do it again" would I purchase the S2G ASG 29? Yes I would. In my opinion, the hits outweigh the misses. In addition, I really like the way the ASG 29 flies - good thermal flying characteristics - flies better than my 4m ASW 27.

One thing worth mentioning: S2G is now officially out of business. If anyone reading this article has or is currently thinking about electrifying a larger scale sailplane, Etienne with Icare carries various model "types" that are a perfect fit for this "sort" of application. Perhaps Icare Sailplanes may just have a the right model for you.

Once again I would like to thank Etienne with Icare Sailplanes for providing support and giving me the opportunity to test the model/power system and write a review. When it comes to electrifying scale sailplanes, bigger is definitely better.

Pluses Minuses
1:3.75 Scale Actual overall flying weight > Manufacturer's quoted weight of 5.1 kg
Good value for $$$ More work required to complete the kit
Good flying characteristics Wings are more "flexy" than expected
Capable of hand launching Paint/Gel coat(finish on fuselage) chips/cracks
Acceptable quality of kit Alignment issues with main wing and fuselage (pegs towards trailing edge)

Last edited by Commplexxo; Sep 29, 2007 at 10:47 PM..
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Sep 30, 2007, 09:37 AM
Registered User
Beautiful ship

The wings are a bit bendy in flight but it looks fine and elegant too in a low pass.

BTW, I noticed a little adverse yaw about 1.09 minutes into the vid. It was a left hand turn and it looked as if the tail dropped into the turn. Though it very possibly could have just been the video angle

Let me know, otherwise a very nice sailplane
Sep 30, 2007, 12:00 PM
Registered User
There was a lot of thermal activity that day. I think I flew through really bad air feeding a thermal nearby. Actually, it very well could of been the thermal straight ahead when I was flying away from the camera (1.10 minutes) - you can hear and see the birds at the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterpiece
Beautiful ship

The wings are a bit bendy in flight but it looks fine and elegant too in a low pass.

BTW, I noticed a little adverse yaw about 1.09 minutes into the vid. It was a left hand turn and it looked as if the tail dropped into the turn. Though it very possibly could have just been the video angle

Let me know, otherwise a very nice sailplane
Last edited by Commplexxo; Sep 30, 2007 at 02:07 PM.
Sep 30, 2007, 05:21 PM
Registered User
Hi, I couldn't find this model in the Icare page.
I'm interested in some details about it ($$$ is one of them)
Fernando.
Sep 30, 2007, 06:35 PM
Registered User
Carter's Avatar
Beautiful.
Sep 30, 2007, 08:18 PM
Registered User
S2G is out of business, if you can find a kit expect to pay around $850 U$.

Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by ferincr
Hi, I couldn't find this model in the Icare page.
I'm interested in some details about it ($$$ is one of them)
Fernando.
Oct 01, 2007, 11:59 PM
iumop ap!sdn w,I
G.P.'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Commplexxo
S2G is out of business, if you can find a kit expect to pay around $850 U$.

Martin
Why did you review a plane that is unavailable? I enjoyed the review and the video until I read that last post.
Last edited by G.P.; Oct 02, 2007 at 07:39 AM.
Oct 02, 2007, 08:37 AM
Dave
CygnusX1's Avatar
Thanks for the review. I love scale sailplanes but also love the convenience of the prop. Great review of a hard to find combination. I am sure alot of this info will still apply to other available scale sailplanes.

After three flight sessions with my EGE, I find myself already looking at these scale gliders. Is that the disease setting in already?

http://www.icare-rc.com/asw28_420.htm albeit a little smaller.

Thanks.
Oct 02, 2007, 10:32 AM
Registered User
Hi Martin,
Great review and video. Have you weighed the model with the conversion? Viewing the video I see a tremendous amount of flex in the wings, that would have me worried, if I was going for any aerbatics.

Regards,
Richard
Oct 02, 2007, 11:41 AM
dmt
dmt
Registered User
dmt's Avatar
Looks cool!
Oct 02, 2007, 03:16 PM
Registered User
Could tell me more about the dolly? I have a 4.2meter ASK-21 That I'm going to E-power. Please tell more about size and wheels. Fred
Oct 02, 2007, 09:37 PM
Registered User
I see this review in a different light than focusing on the fact that S2G is out of business. I do not have any control over successes or failures of businesses that manufacture model airplanes. However, my intention for this review is to share my expertise when it comes to electrifying large scale models.

This review, as mentioned in the conclusion paragraph, is for the benefit of individuals who have thought about electrifying larger scale models but were unsure where to start or what criteria may be used in glider selection.

I have personally committed to do the review well before I have learned that S2G was out of business. My intention was to deliver on my commitment.

Thanks for your inquiry,
Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by G.P.
Why did you review a plane that is unavailable? I enjoyed the review and the video until I read that last post.
Oct 02, 2007, 09:42 PM
Registered User
If I'm not mistaken that's 23.3% ASW 28. I think you'll be happy with your size/scale selection to electrify.

Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by CygnusX1
Thanks for the review. I love scale sailplanes but also love the convenience of the prop. Great review of a hard to find combination. I am sure alot of this info will still apply to other available scale sailplanes.

After three flight sessions with my EGE, I find myself already looking at these scale gliders. Is that the disease setting in already?

http://www.icare-rc.com/asw28_420.htm albeit a little smaller.

Thanks.
Oct 02, 2007, 09:47 PM
Registered User
Richard,

The exact weight is 6.7 kg (237oz.).

Flying/performance of the model does not give me any concerns about the wing flex. The day the video was taken we had a lot of turbulence and heavy thermal activity. I feel quite comfortable with the model. As of today, I have accustomed to the "flexy" wings.

Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbehrends
Hi Martin,
Great review and video. Have you weighed the model with the conversion? Viewing the video I see a tremendous amount of flex in the wings, that would have me worried, if I was going for any aerbatics.

Regards,
Richard
Oct 02, 2007, 09:56 PM
Registered User
Fred,

There isn't really too much to say about the dolly; however, I'll give you what I have.

(1) make sure your C.G. is at the midpoint of your dolly
(2) bigger wheels are better (I went to a local hobby shop and bought the biggest wheels I could find) - you can be creative
(3) I strongly suggest 1.5 to 2 degrees downward incidence (nose down). This should eliminate any "unfortunate" situations that may arise.

I'm also appending few photos,
Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Cotten
Could tell me more about the dolly? I have a 4.2meter ASK-21 That I'm going to E-power. Please tell more about size and wheels. Fred


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