Aerial photos between LA and Denver + stereogram - RC Groups
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Nov 11, 2002, 03:04 PM
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Daemon's Avatar

Aerial photos between LA and Denver + stereogram


It's not R/C related but it is Aeral Photography.. and I thought some of you might enjoy this. Took a whole bunch of shots of the varied terrain between LA and Denver yesterday on my flight home, including a crosseyed stereogram of downtown Denver from the air.
Check it out.
http://www.houseofthud.com/deleteme/la2002.html

I intend to add some more photos and reorganize into a real album, but I just haven't had the chance yet.

Once you get the stereogram to work with the smaller version, try the larger one from a little further away, and then move in for details once it clicks. Once the big buildings are clear, it's fun to see just how much detail you can find in the smaller buildings and structures.. (stadium, overpasses, etc)

Comments are welcome.

ian
Last edited by Daemon; Nov 11, 2002 at 03:09 PM.
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Nov 12, 2002, 12:34 PM
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lad3's Avatar

stereo windowing


That's pretty cool! I've been doing stereo for 11 years now, but never did any flying hypers yet. My only suggestion is to maybe do a little cropping on the sides to even out the stereo window (picky, picky, picky... )
Nov 12, 2002, 02:21 PM
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Bonafidepirate's Avatar
Those stereograms are cool. Would someone be so ind as to direct me to a site with info on how to make them?

Thanks.

Keith
Nov 12, 2002, 06:34 PM
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Daemon's Avatar
The stereogram in question.

This is the smaller version..

It's pretty simple.
You just take a picture, move a short distance in a plane parallel to the target(in this case fly a short distance) and take another centered on the same area. You should be able to do it from a side mounted camera on an R/C plane if you can keep it reasonably level and fly a constant distance from the target.

Bring both images into a paint program like Paint Shop Pro or Photoshop. I generally create a new image twice as wide as either original, then paste the two images in as separate layers to work on em. They often need to be rotated so they line up with each other. Cropped to the same target and same size. (to crop an image within a layer, make a rectangular selection, invert the selection and then hit Delete.. Then use the layer moving tool to place what remains whereever you need it. Place them side by side with their centers about an eye to eye's width apart. The image you took from the right side, should go on the left, the left one on the right. The total image can be as large as 800 pixels wide but 640 is usually better as it works on more monitors. You lose detail at the small size, so I often make one small, one big, and once you understand how to make the small one work, you can try the larger version.

If it's a close up picture then you should literally only move the camera an eye to eye's width (maybe a bit more to exaggerate it) between shots. If it's from a plane and you're high up you can go further obviously. The Denver shot was an accident. I didn't even think to make a stereogram out of it until I realized later that I had two shots close to each other. If I'd remembered I would have taken them closer to each other, and also gotten some out in the Nevada/Utah Canyon country.

Here's a couple other stereograms I've done.



Sorry about the large size. You really have to back away from the monitor to get these started sometimes. Especially if you run your monitor at a low resolution.

lad3,
As for the cropping of the Denver shot. Notice that the angle between shots is pretty extreme so the upper right and middle left are actually the same in both shots even though they're cropped differently. It was weird, but it seemed to work just fine this way. Your eyes track almost right out to the edge just fine, except for the lower right which moved out of frame.

ian

Weird.. It refuses to inline the images above for some reason. Even enclosed in IMG blocks.. Very odd. Oh well. The links works even though they aren't meant to be links.
Last edited by Daemon; Nov 12, 2002 at 06:38 PM.
Nov 12, 2002, 09:03 PM
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Bonafidepirate's Avatar
Those are cool, I had never even heard of doing that before, but I'll have to try that sometime. Thanks for the info.

Keith
Nov 13, 2002, 04:51 PM
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Flying Taco's Avatar
This is some neat stuff. It took me a little while to get my eyes to adjust right. Here's my first attempt.
Nov 13, 2002, 05:40 PM
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Bonafidepirate's Avatar
Cool, it works. That's great Taco!
Nov 13, 2002, 08:21 PM
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stevem1928's Avatar
How would I go about building a view box for these? Like the ones they made 75 years ago. Or, something like a Viewmaster.

I am having trouble seeing the middle picture.
Nov 13, 2002, 09:06 PM
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Daemon's Avatar
Well, just make a box (like a small cereal box shape) that's about one head width wide out of cardboard that is divided down the middle, open at either end and then take any of these stereograms into an image editor, and reverse the placement of the two photos. Put the left one on the right and vise versa. Make absolutely sure that the center of each image one is no more than the width between your eyes apart (a tiny bit closer is probably better). Will probably requires resizing them down a bit, or cropping.

To view, you hold the box up in front of the images with the divider on the center line and then relax and let your right and left eyes see their respective images straight ahead.

I prefer crosseyed stereograms because they can be larger, thus more detailed (matters more in the digital realm), and requires no extra gear to view. Once you "get" one, they should be come easier and easier to see.

To view the ones above I'd suggest you check out the instructions at the bottom of my first link.
http://www.houseofthud.com/deleteme/la2002.html
In particular try the trick with a pencil point. Align it so that the point is positioned in the center of the left image as viewed by your right eye, and in the center of the right image as viewed with your left eye simultaneously. Then focus on the tip of the pencil, and then without uncrossing your eyes shift your focus to the image that should appear behind it. You should see the blurry 3 images behind the pencil tip, and you simply concentrate on trying to bring the center one into focus.

ian
Nov 13, 2002, 09:19 PM
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Daemon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Flying Taco
This is some neat stuff. It took me a little while to get my eyes to adjust right. Here's my first attempt.
Good job. I can see it immediately. Only comment I might make is to consider making it a little narrower for those that struggle to cross their eyes that far. Images in a portrait orientation are generally easiest to deal with because they can be cropped more narrow.

Here's an example of one of those.. Not my image. (Someone please explain to me why this forum about *photography* doesn't allow IMG links like the other forums. That's just backwards.)


ian


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