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Feb 04, 2007, 09:44 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
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Aero, It's good to be back! Seams like the airplane side of things has been dominating my time in resent months. Glad to have a boat project in the works again.

Frank, I couldn't agree more that wood hulls are a great way to buld a boat. But unfortunately, in the world of model boat kitting, wood hulls do little more then limit the number of takers to a level that would pretty well guarantee failure.

Seams like these days that far too few are willing to actually build anything -- that being said, I've seen some true craftsman at work on these threads, so please don't anyone take offence to that statement -- but in reality, those of us who do know a good building project when we see one, and refuse to cowar from it, are too few in number to support the kitting industry. So, the compromise is plastic. And in a backward, convoluted way, I'm glad the guys at Dumas are smart enough to see it too so they can stick around and keep cranking out new stuff to build.

PAT
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Feb 06, 2007, 06:06 AM
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rlboats2003's Avatar

Hey Pat Nice Tug


Pat, I have to ask, are you building the tug stright from the box? I am in the middle of this model too, and looking past some of the short comings of the model as produced, would you be interested in information as far as making it look a little more realistic. Well at least to make it look like a 1900 tug and from the pictures I have found and put under the magnifying glass. Easy Mods for a guy like you, but will really make it look like an old tug.

Happy Lackawanna Modeling,
Rich
Feb 06, 2007, 08:35 AM
"day ain't over yet-"
der kapitan's Avatar
Hi Pat,

we have people in our club who diverge from model boats from time to time, in
our case, their energies go to model railroading.

On the Lackawanna, I've seen the kit in the building process, and can't help but comment on the thickness of the keel, which really detracts from the overall looks
of the tug. It should only be about half of what it is. This could be fixed by trimming back the hull halves before joining them.

Rich (rlboats) agrees too, but has been building right out of the box for a kit review,
and as such, must follow the instructions to the letter.
Feb 06, 2007, 08:51 AM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
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sorry, don't know how the double post happenned
Feb 06, 2007, 08:54 AM
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Rich, Unfortunately, since this is a review, I am bound to build the kit stock, as described in the instructions and report on the high and low points of the build. The only time I would deviate is if something just wouldn't work, or if there was a design flaw that would create a concern for safety.

However, with that being said, I'd love to look at what you have, as there's nothing that says I can't go back after the review with a new thread titled "Improving the Lackawanna".
Feb 06, 2007, 12:00 PM
Grumpa Tom
Kmot's Avatar
Rich is doing a review. Pat is doing a review.

For whom, may I ask?
Feb 06, 2007, 01:35 PM
"day ain't over yet-"
der kapitan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmot
Rich is doing a review. Pat is doing a review.

For whom, may I ask?
Good question, Kmot. I know Rich rather well, and never thought to ask.
Feb 06, 2007, 10:41 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar

I doing the review for Don


Der Kaptian

I'm just doing the review for Don. He was supposed to be doing it from the box to. But then he didn't have time to detail it so he asked if I could finish it off and take picture with my new digital (Thanks Pat, I bought a cannon s3 and got the close up lense for it) so he could write the article/review. For who I don't know.

Of course, you know me, I can't do an out of box kit - So I got the Blujacket plans and made them 1/48, went to the John Diologue website and then blew up the digitals and stared through the mag glass for details. So I have to beleive that Dumas use the one picture in On the Hawser as a reference - it has the spare boat on the stern, I also had its fringe top on to.

What would enhace the boat. I not going to get into the hull issues, because I cant change that, but one thing I couldn't see was scuppers or freeing ports. The Lack had 3 per side I want my ports slightly open so the get the water off the deck. You really need a second set of hawse lips for the inside. and another anchor. What really is missing is the coal scuttles 3 each side and man holes. I have to go through my pictures of #13 a former NYC tug and see if I took pictures of the manholes. Will make decals and mount on styrene disks.

The Deck House - The port hole lay out is good, the Doors need to be 2 panel doors not the style that was laser cut. If you look at the BJ prints there is a base strip the runs around the deck house. Every 8' there is a verticle re-enforcement. The roof edge trim would not be a plain strip. It looks like there was an upper and lower trim. (also look like the were el green) I think .060 and .040 half round under it would make the top and a single .040 for the bottom. This will also be repeated on the pilothouse. Since I plan on using BJ davits I will have to extend them to the main deck with 1/8 tubing.
The Pilot House - after you build the house and cement the window frames and identify where the door are going to be - cover it width .125 v-grove .020 thick siding. Again there is a base board around the bottom. How thick - well measure the height of the .040 half round. Why? Because each grove needs to have a half round over it. The top of the siding where it transitions to the window frames needs a board around the windows and a .040 half round at the top by the window. Run this board from door frame to door frame. The door, well it is a 2 panel bottom with arch windows at the top. I have some more checking to do on the main roof. H-bitts- If you go to Shaun O'boyle (the boatyard one)web site you will find a great picture of the style used on this tug.

The prop in the recommend hardware set is a 3blade- a 4 blade 1.75 - 50 mm prop would fill the spot nicely.

The hull, I only mention this in passing. The real tug was 137' between perpendiculars and had a 150 length over all. The reality is, it is 4+ inches to short. The width of the keel is almost 3.5 ft wide. If you look at the Hercules in SF you will find it has a LOA of 151 ft and is built by the same company as the Lackawana. The usual width for this builder for the bow is about 6-9 inches.

Out side of maybe 100 people who see the model would ever know about the keel, or question the length of the hull. Most people have not seen a turn of the century steam tug, particulary a coastal tug. My wife said it best last week end as she went past on her way to the laundary room - Hey that one looks allot more real than that Altantic tug you were fooling with. Outside of the Titantic how many people can relate to a boat from the begining of the 20th century. With smoke coming out of the stacks and a steam whistle it will turn a few heads.

That's it for now,Happy Modeling,
Rich
Feb 07, 2007, 11:54 AM
"day ain't over yet-"
der kapitan's Avatar
Way to go,Rich!

Very few people have picked up on the real overall length of the Lackawanna. Bluejacket's offering at 1/96 scale puts it at 137', the between-perpendiculars length, and Dumas seems to have blindly followed suit---.
(BP = bow to C/L of sternpost) It should have been about 150' overall.

The drawing from Bluejacket was casually done by a person who should have known better. In addition, he placed the coal scuttles in the wrong locations, putting one set in the crew's quarters forward, and another set in the shaft housing area aft.

In an oceangoing tug of that era, the coal was either loaded through deck scuttles adjacent to the boilers, or through a chute in the roof of the deckhouse.
Feb 07, 2007, 01:59 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar

The Kaptian is right


I got the LOA length from the John Dialogue website were they give the overall length as 150 feet for the Lackawanna. So in 1/48 the hull really is 3.25 actual inches to short. I not going to get into the hull form or keel width.

Again, Outside of maybe 100 individuals who have some a varing degrees of knowledge, the majority of people would say what a nice Tugboat when it is running.

I haven't tried to get any additional pictures from the SSHA because they are moving their files. More pictures would allow for more information.

The interesting thing was measuring the doors. I like Woodland Scenic people - they are in scale - Life-like is the next they are almost always close to scale(the are the best for 1/24 G). Scale is 6 foot or less for a guy figure with out a hat. The Doors are 7' tall and WS people can't look out the window so I need taller 1/48 people. Yes, I plan on opening up the windows.

Having more fun to-night I want to position the scupper/freeing port covers so I can paint the inside of the Bulwarks, a nice light buff. I also want to fit out more of the RC equipment.

Rich
Feb 07, 2007, 03:57 PM
"day ain't over yet-"
der kapitan's Avatar
Rich, just to stir things up a bit, I've had it in my head for several years now to do the Lackawanna in 1/32 scale. That would make the hull over 56" long.

By the way, I have plans and body lines for Hercules, which would give me a really good start. The hull would be more accurate than either Bluejacket or Dumas.

Wouldn't get lost in the pond, for sure---.
Feb 07, 2007, 07:26 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar

The second Lackawanna


I bought from the scratch and dent one for 75.00 It has a bad hull in it and was missing the bag of parts. Because of the Hull form of the orginal I have decided to mount he second on on the Large G tug hull at 29 inches it will be perfect for a NYC transfere tug with a single stack. the deckhouse length will be just about perfect on that length hull.

I order the parts in from dumas for this kit and also another Carol Moran hull set.

Going to go,
Rich

OK Pat, I am done talking, I as well as eveyone else is looking forward to you build of the Model. I always enjoy you buildings and your great pictures that you post.
Last edited by rlboats2003; Feb 09, 2007 at 01:56 PM.
Apr 21, 2007, 02:59 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Too Long Away, But Back To It Again


Sorry about the LONG delay from the last post till now, but things have been unusuallybusy around here since before Christmas. The good news is that the Lakawanna is back on the front burner and going along well now.
Apr 21, 2007, 03:05 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
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Back To the Hull


It all began with gluing the deck assembly into the hull. Once that was done, the ribs were added along the bulwarks. The caprails were added next, which lead to the first deviation from the kit supplied parts. The forward bulwark extender was laser cut from 1/8 balsa, and for that reason looked like it might be overly vulnerable to damage, so I used the wood part as a pattern to make new ones from 1/8 PVC plastic. And with that, the cap rail assemblies were finished up and sanded to shape.
Last edited by P. Tritle; Apr 21, 2007 at 03:11 PM.
Apr 21, 2007, 03:17 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
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Setting Up the Rudder


The Rudder was shaped and soldered up per the plans and instructions. The baring tube block was cut and shaped, and the rudder assembly fitted into the hull. Once the alignment was all set, the block was glued in place. Finally, the keel extension was built up and screwed to the hull.


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