Thread Tools
Aug 22, 2006, 04:23 PM
Registered User
Discussion

Magnetic steering?


I was looking over an older (December 2000) issue of "Aviation Modeller" and they have an article about an "F1E magnet steered glider". It's mainly a construction article, and they gloss over the magnetic steering, but the concept fascinates me...can anyone here tell me more about it, or where to find more about it?

I've Searched this website, but the only thread I can find on magnetic steering is about R/C cars, and Google doesn't seem to have anything either.

Thanks.

rict
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Aug 22, 2006, 05:17 PM
Registered User
Norm Furutani's Avatar
Rict-

This event is just gaining recognition here in the states.

The traditional F1E has a steering rudder attached to a bar magnet (1.5 x .5"). There is very little force, but enough to power a rudder approx. 7" x .75". The compass is mounted on a wire shaft that passes through the rudder above and rides on a low friction bearing below.

The magnet always points north, the rudder is a friction fit on the shaft and can be positioned in any of 360 deg.

Once set, the sailplane will maintain a steady heading. The object is to trim the glider so it stays in the updraft of the slope. You err to the downhill direction, blowing back behind you usually is not good.

The planes are large, mine is about 90" and it's on the smaller side.

There is another thread on RCG: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&highlight=f1e
Like all competition events, the techies are are already at it and we're seeing gyros and talk of GPS etc.

Hope this was some help.

- Norm
Aug 22, 2006, 08:09 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
The only drawback is that it's slope only. No good for thermal flying unless you know of some reliable wave lift in your area that is no more than towline height above the ground.
Latest blog entry: Garden Gliders
Aug 22, 2006, 09:47 PM
Registered User
TLyttle's Avatar
Seems to be a sport for Austrians and Swiss; their other hobby is mountaineering or hiking! I understand that there was a target component to the event in the past, but I haven't seen any mention of it lately.

I live in an area suited to magnet steering, but I'm too old (lazy?) to try it.
Aug 22, 2006, 11:57 PM
Registered User
Norm Furutani's Avatar
We've been flying on a man made hill at Lost Hills. About 60' on one side and 150' over the mining pit. Last year we had the 1st American World Cup contest at this location.
It's an interesting event. Start time is usually after lunch, maxes are determined before the round opens and your score for the round is a percentage of the best score posted (or max).

Air picking(wind AND thermals), glidepath choice, etc. are factors in the results. The circling hawk or vulture 1/2 mile upwind is a welcome sight.

One of the reasons for Lost Hills is most of us have chase bikes but cars can be used. Ian Kaynes shagged all his flights on foot! (we offerred to help!).

An interesting and sometimes amusing chasing issue is you can't ride the line (go over the face of the hill) so you detour, go around etc. which means you just stay with the timer untill the flight is over. Mark the position mentally, and go after it. When close to it your timer can tell you which way to go. At our 1st. contest we used the bull horn to give directions! Most of us are using Walstons, but it was more fun to yell at them!

TLyttle- rumor has it that at some Euro meets they provide you with a mule. At LH we'll find you a Honda.

Here's the results of the LH World Cup last year. Ken Bauer had the best time every round. He was flying an F1A with a gyro and electronic circling timer. He also had a big chunk of luck. One of his flights the plane did a big turn off launch and ran downwind, this is usually a doomed flight. The circle function kicked in just as it hit a thermal on the flat land - a little luck always helps!

Afterwards there is wine and snacks!





The results of the very first F1E World Cup event ever held in USA follow.

Rd: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 final score
max: 180 120 180 180 180 180 180 180

1. Ken Bauer USA 130 120 180 180 180 180 180 180 800%
2. Brian Van Nest USA 111 120 169 162 78 180 180 180 712.6
3. Bob Sifleet, USA 97 111 118 180 139 180 180 180 709.9
4. Norm Furutani, USA 73 116 172 110 128 180 177 77 621.7
5. Jon Davis USA 65 49 121 180 178 108 180 180 616.9
6. Peter Brocks USA 98 120 180 180 102 137 24 170 615.9
7. Vince Croghan USA 74 106 180 180 180 51 180 56 604.7
8. Walt Ghio USA 33 84 63 145 159 137 180 180 575.4
9. Ian Kaynes UK 40 109 68 161 136 180 153 23 522.2
10. Tom Ioerger USA 62 107 180 31 180 180 51 40 504.6
11. Dave Parsons USA 36 62 180 49 177 53 147 121 483.2
Aug 23, 2006, 12:19 AM
Registered User
"The traditional F1E has a steering rudder attached to a bar magnet (1.5 x .5"). There is very little force, but enough to power a rudder approx. 7" x .75". The compass is mounted on a wire shaft that passes through the rudder above and rides on a low friction bearing below.

The magnet always points north, the rudder is a friction fit on the shaft and can be positioned in any of 360 deg."

Norm,

I checked the websites mentioned here, but are there any good pics of the "steering device" itself? I'm having a hard time visualizing it.

rict
Aug 23, 2006, 02:12 AM
Registered User
Norm Furutani's Avatar
I tried to find an online catalog/info with no luck. Give me a day or two and I'll try to take some shots of my plane.

- Norm
Aug 23, 2006, 02:16 PM
Registered User

How to build the magnetic system


rict

The 2006 NFFS Symposium has a complete write up on how to build the magnetic steering mechanism.

Cheers
Aug 24, 2006, 12:38 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfer99
rict

The 2006 NFFS Symposium has a complete write up on how to build the magnetic steering mechanism.

Cheers
surfer99,

and how would I find this? a google search on "2006 NFFS Symposium" gives no hits.

rict
Aug 24, 2006, 03:21 PM
Registered Billy
rict, www.freeflight.org

You may have to contact them by email/other to get info on the 2006 symposium. I got a letter about buying an advanced copy (I am a member) awhile back, but I am not sure if it is actually available yet. Hope this helps.

Brian
Sep 13, 2006, 05:20 PM
Registered User
Norm Furutani's Avatar
Sorry it took so long. But here are a couple pics of the forward steering device. The fixed fin is in the front (right side). The steering rudder is behind and attached to the bar magnet by a long shaft.

- Norm


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools