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Jul 11, 2006, 07:41 PM
The Lone Blue Plaid Flyer
Bob Cook's Avatar
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Typical Search Altitude


Hi Guys,

I know I am opening a can of worms here, but, I have a question for all of you. What is the typical altitude most guys fly up to, before turning off the motor and begin searching for lift ? I have a feeling I'm going to get a lot of different answeres here. I fly alone and have no idea what is the norm for this. Thanks for all the help. Bob in Seattle
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Jul 11, 2006, 07:50 PM
trend
trend.ab's Avatar
The higher, the easier to find a thermal, yet the harder to see the plane...
A trade off as with almost all things in life.
For me, 600 feet is good. I fly a lot of the time lower, though, because I love to see the model.
Jul 11, 2006, 08:03 PM
Registered User
nunz15's Avatar
Depends what I see, what the conditions are. Sometimes you can tell you're in lift right away in the climb, sometimes you get lucky and spot a hawk or buzzard thermaling before you launch. I'll start at about 500 feet usually and if that doesn't work try a different area and go higher.
Mike
Jul 11, 2006, 10:19 PM
Registered User
Yardbird's Avatar
For me about 400-500 feet. I like to be able to see the wings react to any lift. When I see a tilt, I turn into the high wing - most time I catch some lift.
Jul 11, 2006, 11:46 PM
Shut up and fly!
Random Guy's Avatar
The higher the better. Some days, the whole sky over 500 feet seems to be lift.
Jul 12, 2006, 12:04 AM
Registered User
Same here 400 feet or so, some days strong sink makes for a quick relight but
my Renny is a blast.
Jul 12, 2006, 12:11 AM
Registered User
WimH's Avatar
hmmm, 2-300 feet here...
Jul 12, 2006, 05:46 AM
Registered User
Andy W's Avatar
Depends on the model. For speed 400, around 1000'. For 2m, around 1400. For my AVA (3.2m), I'd like 2400 or so, but am only getting 1700 out of the power system right now (designed for 45s class A - 7 cells). Around here, better lift is usually above 1000'..
Zlog trace from a day with my AVA flying A & B (B is only 30s run)
[attachment]876456[/attachment]
..a
Jul 12, 2006, 07:58 AM
sal
sal
Registered User
There is no simple answer for this, because it really depends on the conditions and the local thermal generators. For me the rule of thumb is as low as possible. If you can hook a thermal at 100 feet then do so. Lower launches will improve your flying skills faster.
Jul 12, 2006, 09:51 AM
Just plain ridiculous. Sir.
rdwoebke's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Cook
I fly alone and have no idea what is the norm for this. Thanks for all the help. Bob in Seattle
If you are in Seattle, you should not be flying alone! You could learn a ton from flying with SASS....

Me, I probably go with lower climbs than most but that is because I am a small budget flyer and my power trains are a bit on the "low power" side.

Ryan
Jul 12, 2006, 11:15 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by sal
There is no simple answer for this, because it really depends on the conditions and the local thermal generators. For me the rule of thumb is as low as possible. If you can hook a thermal at 100 feet then do so. Lower launches will improve your flying skills faster.
That is very good advice.
Jul 12, 2006, 11:28 AM
Intermediate Multi
Trisquire's Avatar
I heard that you learn the most from HLGs/DLGs because they fly at a height where you can easily observe them.

Tom
Jul 12, 2006, 01:00 PM
more kW, more problems
trashmanf's Avatar
good point there about the DLGs... those demand you to find the low lift and ride it up... sort of like being pushed out of the nest!
Jul 12, 2006, 05:22 PM
MTT
MTT
I care about rising air !
MTT's Avatar
On both my e-sailplanes, a 4m Valenta Thermik XL, and a 3.1m Jaro Muller Esprit, the power plant will get the plane to 600-700 ft with 1 minute runtime.
So, I have set a timer on my TX, which gets started by the on/off switch for the electric motor, and counts down 60 seconds.
Depending on how smoothly I fly during the climb it will be 600 or 700 ft (as reported by picolario) after one minute.
Occasionally, with a freshly charged battery pack, and exceptionally smooth flying on my part, I will be at 800 ft after one minute, but that is the exception.
A that altitude I usually find some lift, unless it's one of those "dead" days.
Jul 15, 2006, 06:15 AM
Registered User
Andy W's Avatar
I received the following PM and thought I'd share the question and my response..

Quote:
Hi Andy, Your search altitudes seen very high to me. I was up at 500 ft on several occations and could not hardly see the plane. Almost specked out. At 1000 ft., I would need binoculars to see the plane. My Omega is only a 2 meter plane. How do you manage these alitiudes and see what you are doing ? Thanks,
Ric Vaughn (posts here, several time LMR NATS overall champion) and I discuss this often. Many people say "my model is out of sight in 10 seconds" when his 3.5m B ship climbs better than pretty much anything but the highest power F5J setups I've ever seen. He gets to about 2400' in 30s. I don't like to time for him becuase in all but ideal conditions, I can lose sight of his model above 2000'. It turns out, "specked out" or "out of sight" is highly dependant on the pilots eyesight. At the King Peach LMR contest recently, I was helping several guys who hadn't competed before. One put his 2m Aspire up around 1500', and was very uncomfortable - he actually spun it down to around 1000' before he'd continue the task. I had no issue seeing his model @ 1500' (although that's about my limit for a 2m model, and am used to flying at that altitude) but he was just uncomfortable with it. A couple of guys had smaller models that they kept well below 1000' at all times.

So it's what you can see, and are comfortable with.
..a


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