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Jul 27, 2002, 03:38 PM
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Peter Rake's Fokker D-VIII


Looking ahead to this fall/winters building projects, I was thinking of building Peter Rake's Fokker D-VIII from the plans in FSM. I have the plans and the article, does anyone have additional comments/suggessions on the model before I order wood and get started?

Jim
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Jul 27, 2002, 04:21 PM
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Jim,
Don't just think about it, build her. Seriously though, although I, and several others, like her just as drawn, some people have voiced the opinion that ailerons might not be a bad idea. She suits my flying style without them, but I see no reason why they couldn't be fitted easily enough. Since I haven't flown her in anything other than her original form, I can't comment on how much difference they make.

Pete
Jul 27, 2002, 06:54 PM
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Thanks Peter, I'll do it!

A couple of questions:

How much did the plane weigh

prop size?

7 or 8 cells?

and, have you used any of the 3:1 or 4:1 gearboxes for the sp400, or just the 2.33:1. I was wondering if the 3:1 or 4:1 would be better at swinging a larger prop (larger than 9" that is).

Jim
Jul 28, 2002, 03:47 AM
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Jim,
I think she weighed about 19 oz ready to fly, with a 7 cell 500AR pack on board.

I have used 4:1 gearboxes, but prefer the 2.33:1 types for most of my models. Since I usually swing a prop between 10x6 and 11x7 anyway, I haven't found the higher ratio box to be any advantage. Yes, I know that many people say I use too big a prop, but it works for me.

Pete
Jul 29, 2002, 06:54 PM
Gambler-AG DLG Designer
Allan Wright's Avatar
I saw one at NEAT fair last year and it flew great. I'm building Peter's Bristol Scout right now and I'm having no troubles.
Jul 30, 2002, 02:08 PM
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Frank Rys's Avatar

Fokker D-VIII


That was my D-VIII at NEAT last year, good flier, has plenty of power as advertised, not a beginers plane though. I flew mine with the Mini-Olympus 2:33:1 and a Top Flite 9-6 wooden prop, and 7 600 AE,s. Just keep up the speed in the turns as it has a tendency to slip inward if you don't keep up the speed. The D-VIII looks and sounds fantastic in the air.
Jul 30, 2002, 02:20 PM
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Frank Rys's Avatar
I'll try the picture again......
Jul 30, 2002, 05:57 PM
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Wow Frank, that plane is beautiful!! Now I want to build one more than ever. If you don't mind me asking, how did you do the lozenge. Was it printed on tissue?

Jim
Jul 30, 2002, 10:39 PM
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DeanW's Avatar
Would it be viable to enlarge this plan to say a 60 inch wing span, add ailerons and a geared 600?

Cheers

Dean
Jul 31, 2002, 12:04 AM
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Frank,
I have to agree with Jim, that is one nice looking little model. You've done her proud.

Dean,
Simplicity itself mate. Just about all my designs can be scaled in either direction, as evidenced by my 67" Pfalz E1 and my 24" Bristol Scout. I'm a firm believer in 'never build one model from a plan if you can build three'. X1.5 would put her just about spot on for a geared 600, but don't scale up all the wood sizes by that much. Using the standard c/s strut system, the wings could easily be retained by saddle clamps for quick assembly.

Pete
Jul 31, 2002, 07:34 AM
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Frank Rys's Avatar

Lozenges..lozenges


Thanks for your kind words, The lozengeswere painted on grey Litespan using RCM's lozenge stencil plan #996A reduced about 1/3rd, there are four stencils, ..so sit in front of the TV and get out your X-acto and cut them out. Then go to a craft store and buy some paint pencils ( they come in different tip sizes) so you do not want too fine of a point. I drew the outline of each lozenge stencil with that color then filled it in later, do the next color the same. Start with the lightest colors as it is easier to cover up your mistakes, As the colors go on you wont have to outline the complete lozenge because the shape is there from the other lozenge color. I did this after the fuselage was covered, start on the bottom (no body looks at that anyway) it will become obvious how you need to do this. This really does not take a long time to do this, the last side that I did took about one hour. A quick and easy , and foolproof way , to do this , it even looks good close up. I used some matte clear urethane to seal it. The paint tends to pucker the litespan but a heat gun on low takes care of that. Aside from that the D-VIII is easy to build,be cautioned that this is not a yank and bank airplane, this is one of my favorites, anyway Peter's plans are the best. Good luck.......Anyway that i can help, let me know.
Jul 31, 2002, 10:09 AM
Visitor from Reality
Mine was done in Czech airforce colours to avoid the lozenges! It was technically an EV, but who's counting?

Actually, it was an oily bird, done to to 1/6th scale around 1984-ish. Interesting device to fly, as I did the fin/rudder to true scale - forget the original drawing source, but recall they were accepted as the most accurate around at the time.

Take off was done like a rotary ship - full power, into wind. Fine.

Flying - not too bad, bear in mind I didn't have all that much pendulum weight as an electric would have. The rudder merely moved the nose around some with little effect on bank angle, unless I applied a lot of rudder, when it entered a vicious dive.

Despite that, I can still recall a panic stricken couple of minutes when the aileron flylead unhitched itself - fortunately with the ailerons in neutral. I manage to crab her around, line her up and do an autoland. Fortunately it was also flat calm.

Landing - into wind, on the mains. All bets off when the tail dropped towards the ground and blanked out that silly little vertical appendage

She won one scale comp, scored well in others and finally spun into the ground on her 13th flight. Not a fun model at all!

I hung onto the reference material for a while, then passed them on. I suspect they ended up in Dave Hurrell's hands, and were the start point for a much better replica from his drawing board. Or maybe not ...

Smaller and lighter, as Peter's, would have been a lot less stress. I'd definitely recommend ailerons on a bigger one though. If you want to see what bigger looks like, check out Keith Shaw's 1/4 scale beauty, MaxCim are now selling the motor he uses too.

FWIW - the wing shape and sections are very subtle on the DVIII IIRC, it was flat on the top, taper was all on the bottom and the tips were on the centreline of the last rib. To make it more fun, it was very thick and undercambered. If you really want to pick nits, the stab had a lot of positive built in and the miniscule fin was offset permanently to counter engine torque - and, yes, I added that too.

Build Peter's, it has to fly better!
Aug 02, 2002, 01:10 PM
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Thread OP
Has anyone put washout in to the wing tips to help prevent tip stalls or is that not a problem with this model?

Jim


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