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Oct 08, 2002, 01:45 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
I work my way around from one side of the curve to the other. At each spot, I make sure to hold the next section away from the iron as shown in this pic. This pic shows three sections - the first is at the right side of the surface as shown, and has been rolled around to the backside. The second is still overhanging, but is directly facing the camera. The third is where you see my finger, as I'm holding it away from where the iron will be. Use your iron in a rolling motion from the covered side to the backside. You can increase the heat a little bit for this to ease getting out the micro wrinkles.
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Oct 08, 2002, 01:47 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Once you've laid all of the overhanging edges down on the backside, shrink the open areas with your preferred method and you're ready to do the backside. Lather, rinse, repeat. Do the back side precisely the same. The overhang amount on both sides can depend on what color of covering you're using. For example, I'd decrease that overhang for white, as you can partially see through it. However, for this olive green, it's totally opaque, so the overhang I left at about 1/8"
Oct 08, 2002, 01:49 AM
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Once you get practiced a bit, you can eventually cover simple surfaces like this fin all with one piece.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:49 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Tack down and trim one side as instructed above....
Oct 08, 2002, 01:51 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
In this example, I've cut the covering flush with the bottom of the fin to allow for gluing the fin to the stab. Do this AFTER shrinking the covering in the open areas or you'll watch that nice clean cut line creep up your wood and leave an ugly bare patch.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:52 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Use your iron to fold the covering around the backside and repeat the process. With practice, this can be done with no wrinkles aside from the small ones typical of the open areas before shrinking. Ta da!
Oct 08, 2002, 01:53 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
An additional challenge is covering two sides of the same thing with two different colors, especially contrasting colors. I still have a hard time getting the cut line perfect along the edge of things where I'm doing this. Here's the top of my fin/stab assembly.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:54 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
... and here's the bottom.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:56 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Now, I've FINALLY got some pics of my rip-and-tear method of removing the backing. I prefer this, as I'm not a big tape user, and I've always got a knife in hand. Tape I have to hunt for. In this pic, the covering is laid down with the backing side up. I cut about a 1/2" slit into the corner of the covering.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:56 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Riiiiiiiiiiip
Oct 08, 2002, 01:57 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
As the backing tears differently than the covering, most often the backing will start to seperate. Once this begins, you can help it by pulling your torn chunk back towards the corner of the covering.
Oct 08, 2002, 01:59 AM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
If necessary, use your knife blade to hold the covering to the table and start peeling the backing off! In reality, this only takes a few seconds to do, especially once you get in the groove. Just make sure you've cut your covering with enough overhang to allow doing this.

Martin
Oct 28, 2002, 11:49 AM
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MrBungle's Avatar
Martin, I know this thread is dead, but thanks.

I have seen solite at the local, but after reading a couple of threads about some difficulties with it I was a little hesitant to buy it, now I think I'll give it a go.
Do you think solite would be okay for micro's around 14" span? or will it be too fiddly?
I was searching for info about using tissue+dope when I found this thread, but that was scaring me more than solite.


Regarding seperating films from their backing, I used to do it with the tape method, but have found another that is quicker and easier.
I grip a corner or edge of the covering between my index finger and thumb, with the film facing down onto the index finger, and the backing facing up toward the thumb.
I then rub my thumb toward the tip of the index finger and across the cut edge of the covering. Repeating this a few times I can get the backing to curl up and stand proud after the second or third rub, sometimes it rolls. Only the backing is affected, the film stays flat. Takes about 1/2 second per rub.
I hope the explanation above works to paint a picture, I don't have a digital camera to take pics

So far, this has worked for me with Solarfilm, Monokote and some other covering I bought years ago but can't remember which brand it is. It might just work with solite. worth a shot.

Thanks again,
Simon
Oct 28, 2002, 12:10 PM
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Martin Hunter's Avatar
Threads never die. They just fade away

I will definately try that backing removal method with solite the next time I'm covering with it!

I've covered some pretty small and fiddly bits with solite, so I think it would be a good choice for planes that size.

Martin
Oct 28, 2002, 12:12 PM
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If anyone is hesitant to use it for the first time, I tried it for the first time myself a few weeks ago, withought too many problems. the one problem i had at first was not enough structure (too weak to handle taught covering). I added more balsa, and viola, I now get good results.

I't not as hard as it seems!


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