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Jul 21, 2002, 12:01 AM
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What materials have been used in motor winds?


I started to think about the fact that copper is used in motor windings. Does anyone know of a BL motor with gold windings? Ca-ching! I was curious because there's likely some other material out there (other than gold) to help conductivity. It may be true that copper is hard to beat, but I wouldn't know...

I know that the main area that needs improvement is battery characteristics. Is there copper or gold in batteries somewhere? Is there a better battery already out there, just unreasonably expensive?
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Jul 21, 2002, 12:09 AM
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I've found this, but it only half answers my question. Neat webpage as well:

Superconductor 200 times efficient as copper

I'm not entirely sure where it's this effiecient, but it's supposed to help technology in general. It's just going to take so long!!!

Hey, now we know who's making the new quick rechargeable NiMh's from Rayovac:
New batt's, slightly older news
....but better information.

One opinion, if these batteries can be recharged safely so fast, wouldn't you figure that means these cells can handle that much more draw of current? I hope that's the case...
Last edited by e-sailpilot86; Jul 21, 2002 at 12:29 AM.
Jul 21, 2002, 07:19 AM
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ScottS's Avatar
I believe copper is really better than gold as a conductor. Gold is mostly used for contacts because it is more resistant to corrosion.
Jul 22, 2002, 10:26 PM
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Silver is a better (i.e. lower resistance) conductor than copper but costs more.
Jul 23, 2002, 11:25 AM
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Mr.RC-CAM's Avatar
Quote:
... if these batteries can be recharged safely so fast, wouldn't you figure that means these cells can handle that much more draw of current?
From what I can tell, they did not make any changes to the cell chemistry to accommodate the 15 minute recharge. The magic is mechanical.

These new "I-C3" cells have a incorporated a sensitive pressure activated switch (mechanical operation). It terminates the recharge currents when the cell's internal pressure climbs, something that happens at the end of charge. This is just the pressure that could cause venting if it was left unattended.

I wonder if the pressure switch will cause troubles in high-vibration apps (like glow engine models). For example: Years ago when R/C'ers used Alkaline Rx batteries, the double-wall'd steel contact area on the positive tips of some cells caused intermittent operation. This makes me a bit cautious of the Rayovac pressure switch concept. I expect it to be fine for e-flight though.


Regards,
Mr. RC-CAM


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