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Mar 18, 2006, 04:59 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
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Hobbico Sky Fly - Great $100 3Ch package


Took my nephew flying with my planes. He is 14.

He liked it so much he wanted a plane of his own. I took him to buy an Aerobird Challenger, which has dropped in price to $109. But no one had it.

Instead he got a Hobbico Sky Fly. $100 with everything.

We have not flown it yet, but so far it looks like a GREAT package. Good quality, easy to assemble. Excellent tricycle landing gear that can really take a shock! Ground handling is outstanding for a plane that does not have a steerable wheel. You can actually drive it up and down the street using the rudder.

We did this last evening so he would get used to flying toward himself. Kid is sharp. Picking things up very fast.

It comes with an AC/DC Charger and a 6 cell 900 mah NiMh pack.

Radio is two stick arrangement with r/E on right and throttle on left. Great feel with soft rubber grips that make it easy to hold.

Spare wing was $7 and extra 6 cell 900 mah nimh packs $12 each. Fantastic.

We have not flown it yet.

If anyone has this plane and can provide any tips about it, I would appreciate it. So far it looks like a real winner. If it flies as well as I believe it will, it could get added to my list of recommended starter planes. Hopefully the weather will cooperate and we will see tomorrow.
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Mar 19, 2006, 01:53 AM
Registered User
Hi Ed,
I'm a newbie, joined a month ago. I've been visiting many web sites (manufacturers) and 3 different forums. I would think I found the right plane and the more info I read, the more confused I would get. It was kind of like "Ground Hog Day" over and over again, if you know what I mean.

I appreciate your advice, it is good for newbies and advanced fliers alike. Anyway, about a week age I decided to buy an Easy Star ARF and I didn't want a throw away radio so I decided to buy a DX6 ( read your article on computer radios). I think I am still going to do this, but I have the bug to buy something I can fly today and I'm going to need a little help with the electronics ( right battery, controller, ect.) for the Easy Star. I like to research things, sooner or later everything becomes clearer.

Then I went to a LHS yesterday and they had a Firebird Commander II and a Skyfly, both $100. I really liked the Skyfly and I agree the landing gear looked very sturdy and the plane looked very well made. I almost bought it, but decided to check computer for info on it. I found your post, but see you didn't get any responses yet, and I couldn't find much info on it anywhere. Have you flown it yet? Do you have any opinion between the two planes? I appreciate your input.

I actually bought my first plane 2 weeks ago, an Aero Airhog (miniplane), if that counts, but have not flown it yet (too windy).

Thanks,
Jim
Mar 19, 2006, 06:29 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimb42
Hi Ed,
I'm a newbie, joined a month ago. I've been visiting many web sites (manufacturers) and 3 different forums. I would think I found the right plane and the more info I read, the more confused I would get. It was kind of like "Ground Hog Day" over and over again, if you know what I mean.

I appreciate your advice, it is good for newbies and advanced fliers alike. Anyway, about a week age I decided to buy an Easy Star ARF and I didn't want a throw away radio so I decided to buy a DX6 ( read your article on computer radios). I think I am still going to do this, but I have the bug to buy something I can fly today and I'm going to need a little help with the electronics ( right battery, controller, ect.) for the Easy Star. I like to research things, sooner or later everything becomes clearer.

Then I went to a LHS yesterday and they had a Firebird Commander II and a Skyfly, both $100. I really liked the Skyfly and I agree the landing gear looked very sturdy and the plane looked very well made. I almost bought it, but decided to check computer for info on it. I found your post, but see you didn't get any responses yet, and I couldn't find much info on it anywhere. Have you flown it yet? Do you have any opinion between the two planes? I appreciate your input.

I actually bought my first plane 2 weeks ago, an Aero Airhog (miniplane), if that counts, but have not flown it yet (too windy).

Thanks,
Jim
I have yet to see a RTF kit that flies great. They all seem to fly either just ok or poor. The difference can mean having to go into a steep dive to perform a loop or being able to loop at 1/2 to 3/4 power.

The easystar flies great on 8 cells. The CBP1150 2/3 A at http://cheapbatterypacks.com is a great pack for the plane. You could go with IB cells though u add about 10 grams in extra weight. (I would suggest getting them with female deans connector and brick type layout)

I'm using this 15amp ESC here which cost $15 and works great:
http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXELT5&P=ML

It's well worth it to spend the 6 hours it takes putting together the easystar ARF kit. You will need medium CA and soldering iron + connectors to finish the kit.
Mar 19, 2006, 09:47 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3d-flyer
I have yet to see a RTF kit that flies great. They all seem to fly either just ok or poor. The difference can mean having to go into a steep dive to perform a loop or being able to loop at 1/2 to 3/4 power.
.
We can spend many hours around the concept of flying good, great, adequately, etc. I could say the same about my family car vs an expensive sports car. The famly car drives well and is adequate to the task, but that Ferrari will certainly out perform it. Doesn't make the family car a bad car.

I have flown many RTF packages that have flown very well and are more than adequate to the needs of a new flyer. Sometimes a small enhancemnet can be very helpful. Going from the stock battery to one of a little higher voltage can easily be one of those enhancements.

I think the Easy Star is a wonderful first plane. If flies adequately on the stock 6 cell in calm air. However I would not recommend buying any more 6 cell packs for it. My minimum recommendation for the Easy Star is 7 cells, and 8 cells is even better. But don't go abve 8 cells or two lithiums as you will burn out the motor and perhaps the ESC.
Mar 19, 2006, 09:58 AM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
Ed,

Do you have some pictures of the Sky Fly? Is it a slow flyer?

I just noticed two good reviews on this plane and I'm thinking this might be a good plane for our Bear Scout den to teach a little about RC airplanes. We have a outdoor flight trip planned next Saturday -kites and gliders, and was discussing RC aiprlanes also.

Thanks,

Frank
Mar 19, 2006, 11:52 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL

correct typo


If you have links to reviews I would love to see them.

Photos and info:
http://www.flyzoneplanes.com/airplan...961-index.html

This is definately NOT a slow flyer. It is typical of the pod and boom speed 380 class planes like the Aerobird, T-Hawk, etc. I would call it a medium speed plane. That means you will need at least 600X600 in space for it and more is better. However it can take more wind than the slowflyers so you have more flexability as to when you can fly AFTER YOU LEARN TO FLY IT IN CALM AIR.

It has the best landing gear I have seen on this class of plane, and that is a valuable asset. If you can find a very short grass or dirt area you can rise off the ground (ROG) rather than hand launch it. The landing gear will also help absorb some landing shock on those less then perfect landing.

Has an AC/DC charger as well. Be sure you get at least one extra battery pack or two and a spare wing. You will get more flying time and less "I shoulda" time.
Last edited by aeajr; Mar 19, 2006 at 03:51 PM.
Mar 19, 2006, 12:33 PM
Registered User
Tsquare's Avatar
Removed original post. Ed I always enjoy reading your informative posts.
Gene
Last edited by Tsquare; Mar 19, 2006 at 10:39 PM.
Mar 19, 2006, 02:04 PM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
Ed,

RE reviews: one was yours, the other I'm sure you saw.

He seemed to be pretty pleased with it. I'm afraid this might be too fast of a flyer for 9 year olds though. I do like the fact that it can handle the wind better though. I'd like to know your thoughts on whether you think this might be a good plane to let 6 nine year old kids fly with for the first time. I guess I could get in the air for them and let them fly it around some, but it would be really great if they could take off with it. I see crashes though, that's for sure. What do you think?

Thanks,

Frank

PS I see it comes with tamiya connectors and a 6 cell batt. Do see it possible to go with 7 cell 750 NiHms and cgange out the ESC connector to powerpoles? -Thanks again.
Mar 19, 2006, 04:03 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
Quote:
Originally Posted by murocflyer
Ed,

RE reviews: one was yours, the other I'm sure you saw.

He seemed to be pretty pleased with it. I'm afraid this might be too fast of a flyer for 9 year olds though. I do like the fact that it can handle the wind better though. I'd like to know your thoughts on whether you think this might be a good plane to let 6 nine year old kids fly with for the first time. I guess I could get in the air for them and let them fly it around some, but it would be really great if they could take off with it. I see crashes though, that's for sure. What do you think?

Thanks,

Frank

PS I see it comes with tamiya connectors and a 6 cell batt. Do see it possible to go with 7 cell 750 NiHms and cgange out the ESC connector to powerpoles? -Thanks again.
First, GENE, thanks for catching that typo. I fixed it.

Frank, I had not seen that review. Thanks for the link.

RE Skyfly battery - The plane comes with 6 cell 900 mah NiMh and flies very well on that pack. It will definately take a 7 cell pack. The Aerobird packs will fit. You can change to any connectors you like. I happen to like Deans ultra plugs.

As for teaching 9 year olds, I think that well supervised attentive 9 year olds could fly it with you very close at hand. I have trained 7 year olds to fly my Aerobird Challenger by launching the plane, then kneeling behind them. I put their hand on mine. I fly and let them feel my thumb movements. I ALWAYS have throttle control.

In low wind condition I fly it to height, get it at a comfortable altitude for cruising, then take a couple of circuts, their thumb on mine. If they are paying attention, I put my hand on theirs and continue to control the plane but their finger is on the stick. If they show that they understand, then I keep my hand close but pull it away and give them control.

I have yet to have a child who could not take the Aerobird from me after 15 minutes of this. Usually on the second pack, after I get it high and stable, they can fly it around the pattern IN CALM AIR.

I don't see any reason why the Sky Fly could not serve the same purpose. It flies quite nicely at 1/2-2/3 throttle for slower flights and it glides nicely. It has a nice switch activated beginner mode that gives a little softer controls and adds a touch of up elevator when you give it rudder commands. But you can flip to pro mode and save the flight in a blink if you are fast.

Could a 9 year old take it off and land it. Some yes and some no. Depends on how good an instructor you are and how focused they can be. At 9 they can fly 3D aerobats, or can fail to understand left from right. Very wide range.

I have had a 7 year old totally solo in flight to the point that I would turn away and talk to his astonished Dad while the kid flew my plane. He was exceptioinal. 15 minutes for that then he flew 3 packs after I launched, and I landed it. I think in two more sessions he could have landed it too, but they never came back.

I would like an Easy Star better. More damage resistant and the Neon radio that comes with the plane can have a trainer port added for about $18 so you can run a buddy cord. But the Sky Fly should work well and the price is really good. Keep it to only 1 or two kids per teacher/plane or they won't get enough stick time.
Last edited by aeajr; Mar 19, 2006 at 04:18 PM.
Mar 20, 2006, 08:56 PM
Promoting Model Aviation...
Murocflyer's Avatar
Ed,

Very good trainer advice. I appreciate you posting it. I'll defintiely give it a try. Normally I'm not so "hands-on" but it sounds like the way to go.

Thanks!

Frank
Mar 20, 2006, 09:29 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL

Range


One thing is that the range on the Sky Fly is not as long as the Aerobird or the T-Hawk or similar planes. FlyZone just sent me an e-mail that says it is only 500 feet.

Now 500 feet is less than I would have liked, but it is comparable to a GWS 4 channel receiver that many people usef or small electrics. To visualize 500 feet, that is about 1.5 football fields.

So, the Sky Fly is not up to the competition in this area. But for most people it will be adequate. Just don't let it get out too far.

On our field, 800X1600 feet, I would be concerned about this 500 foot limit. My Aerobird has been flown 1200-1600 feet on many occasions. That is the length of our field. Apparently the Sky Fly will not be able to be flown out that far.
Last edited by aeajr; Apr 12, 2006 at 06:57 AM.
Mar 21, 2006, 10:55 AM
IWC
IWC
Registered User
$78 at Larry's Hobby, Sterling Heights, MI
Mar 21, 2006, 11:49 AM
Registered User
Ed, Thanks for posting the range limitation. It definitley goes into the equation of whether or not to purchase this plane compared to the T-hawk or Aerobird. Also, one of the other threads indicated that the wing folded quite easily, so it would probably be a good idea to reinforce the wing right away.

Frank, For your Bear Scout den, consider getting a couple or three AeroAce planes. You can buy three AeroAces for less than one SkyFly. They come in three channels, so you can have three kids flying at the same time. You need very little room, the planes are virtually indestructable, and are extremely easy to learn. Your 9 year lods will love them and you will not be disappointed. The kids will spend all of their time flying, rather than crashing and fixing.
Mar 21, 2006, 01:51 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by aeajr
One think is that the range on the Sky Fly is not a long as the Aerobird or the T-Hawk or similar planes. FlyZone just sent me an e-mail that says it is only 500 feet.

Now 500 feet is less than I would have liked, but it is comparable to a GWS 4 channel receiver that a lot o people use. 500 feet is about 1.5 football fields.

So, the Sky Fly is not up to the competition in this area. But for most people it will be adequate. Just don't let it get out too far.

On our field I would be concerned as my Aerobird has been flonw 1200-1600 feet on many occasions. That is the length of our field. Apparently the Sky Fly will not be able to be flown out that far.
They may have given you the ground range. The range in the air may be much more. (about 2000 feet)

Hobbico is overall one of the better brands out there.
Mar 22, 2006, 06:01 AM
Registered User

Sky Fly flys great!


Just got a Sky Fly and it flys very well,has a very nice quality contoller.It
evwen flys well in moderate wind(10-15 mph)Overall I was impressed as
I have a Aerobird and a J-3 Cub.


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