Thread Tools
This thread is privately moderated by genovia, who may elect to delete unwanted replies.
May 14, 2002, 01:02 PM
Leave me alone!
Martin Hunter's Avatar
I found, while searching for something entirely different, a different perspective of the carnage of my super hots crash. Please note that in this kit, 90% of the fuselage is 1/8 light ply!!!!
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
May 15, 2002, 01:51 AM
Registered User

Re: Re: E3D


Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamer


Paul, how the blankety blank did you get it lighter after repairs? All of my planes gain in the area of 10 to 25% more weight through getting repaired!
Oops, I meant heavier, but not by much

Paul
May 15, 2002, 02:35 AM
Registered User
Patrick Plawner's Avatar
Dreamer,


very interesting picture. Looks like an historical excavation.


From which century, BC, is this from ?

May 15, 2002, 11:41 AM
Leave me alone!
Martin Hunter's Avatar
it felt like a dig too when I had to retrieve the engine down a foot and a half in the dirt
May 15, 2002, 12:25 PM
RPV builder & operator
Pierre Audette's Avatar
No picture here, so you'll have to visualize the carnage. I was flying my sport 400 last weekend on 8 cells. It was acting tail heavy, and rather than land the sucker right away, I decided to keep going. I eventually lost control of it over a wooded area. Heard this loud crackling sound from some distance away, which makes you wonder if it's balsa or tree limbs being snapped.

After a 5 minutes search I found all the pieces, which looked like a total write-off. The wing came off, with the mounting bolt plate, and was virtually undamaged. The fuse from the nose to LE was in 4 pieces, and a good chunck of the tail snapped off and crushed. The only thing I didn't recover was the elevator rod.

I got home, and for the sadistic pleasure of doing an autopsy, I proceeded to put the jig saw puzzle back together. It wasn't that bad after all, and didn't require too much new balsa. It took some considerable amount of lightweight spackle to smooth our the wrinkles tough. I just need to check the servo gears, but it looks like it may fly again. I've gone through this scenario on this plane so many times, I've lost track, although I've re-christened the plane now as the 'glue stick'. So the question is: when do you give up repairing a plane that flies fine. I've given up on planes that were marginal flyers, and although it gets heavier everytime, it seems just easier to glue the bits & pieces back than starting from scratch.
May 15, 2002, 02:21 PM
Registered User
Quote:
So the question is: when do you give up repairing a plane that flies fine.
When it no longer flys fine of course.
May 16, 2002, 10:18 AM
Registered User
Frank's Avatar
My fairly new MicroBipe bit the dust hard last night. It was fast, but duration stunk. Minute one was "wow, good roll", minute two usually was just hanging on, minute three was decision time, do I land with power or deadstick it on. My mistake was flying inverted at the end of minute two. Ran out of altitude, airspeed and ideas all at the same time. Stalled it and barely rolled it upright before it augered in. The weak gear mount gave way, gear folded aft and punched through the leading edge, covering and spars of the right wing and basically shredded the whole structure. The only good news is that it made the radio gear available for my almost-finished Herr Pitts.
Last edited by Frank; May 16, 2002 at 10:21 AM.
Jul 13, 2002, 05:24 PM
The One....
genovia's Avatar
***My mistake was flying inverted at the end of minute two. Ran out of altitude, airspeed and ideas all at the same time. Stalled it and barely rolled it upright before it augered in. The weak gear mount gave way, gear folded aft and punched through the leading edge, covering and spars of the right wing and basically shredded the whole structure. ***

Sounds like a well, managed crash Frank

Flew my Cub early this month, before I broke my good launching arm. I was setting it up for a warm up. Two guys for the field that I fly too, came over, curios Heli. guys, and asked me about Eflight airplanes. Blah.blah,blah.......

Time to fly. One guy squatting not far from me, and another guys beside him. Give the Cub a good, energetic hand launch...... WELLLL... DArnessss thing, forgot to check the trim on the elev. it was a bit up, the Cub went vertical Tried to correct it, holding to dear Cub.......... AHHH... Made a loop in low alt. right click and it went somewhat straight down to the guys, that was squatting down beside me, and nose to the dirt first right beside him. I dashed for cover.

Lucky,luck,lucky let me tell ya!! This time, I am glad that the Cub was the only one broken, and not poke through the other guys head

My Cub is dead, and the guys is luck, and so am I
Jul 13, 2002, 06:00 PM
Registered User
Tony Oliver's Avatar

Crashes


Dreamer, I was interested in your pic of the bits of fuselage 'made from liteply'. It made me think of my current beef about poor construction methods and materials.
It really is a very unsuitable material for anything needing strength other than more rigidity compared with balsa. Unfortunately many kit, and most RTF models appear to be built with liteply in large proportions. It's easier to work than ply, is more 'dingproof' than balsa, and is relatively cheap to buy in large sheets, and it's light.
If you look closely at, say, 1/8th liteply you see two outer skins of 1/32 or less with the grain used along the fuselage, and one layer in between of maybe 1/16th (or more) with the grain at 90 deg to the outer. As the inner has no real strength (would you rely on a 1/16th balsa fus. with all the grain vertical?) , and the glue joint poor, you are left with two sheets of less than 1/32 each running along the fuselage. I know the arguments about 'the Mosquito was built like that' but this is a different situation. Would you confidently expect a model with 1/16th sheet sides to survive anything but a smooth landing every time?
I built a model (Flair Volture) which used this method - to compound the problems, it had locating slots cut in the liteply for formers to be located by liteply tongues. This model was so fragile that after a number of repairs after fairly normal landings on grass, I glassed the thing which really worked well.
I am not against the material as I use it a lot, but mainly for stiffening jobs on balsa bulkheads or formers. Two bits laminated with the grain at 90 degrees are immensely strong and light but you need to choose horses for courses.

Reading back over this, I should add that I'm not getting at you, more a case of reminding people that cheap is often at the expense of durability with models. Your pic reminded me of so many crashed models - including my Volture - which had the same failure results - lots of shredded bits all about 2 inches square!

Tony
Jul 13, 2002, 07:34 PM
The One....
genovia's Avatar
Anthony, Antonio, Tony, Tonyo, Onyot...Hehehe Andong is what they use to call me
Jul 13, 2002, 08:07 PM
Leave me alone!
Martin Hunter's Avatar
tonyo, I bought the airplane used from someone else anyway, but the fuselage was bulletproof (in my hands anyway) until I dorked it.
Jul 14, 2002, 12:25 AM
Registered User
Patrick Plawner's Avatar
For more details on the Crash, go to:

http://plawner.net/

but I think this crash deserves some respect
Jul 14, 2002, 09:13 AM
Registered User
Ouch
Jul 14, 2002, 04:07 PM
Swedes don't grow on trees
Jonas Leander's Avatar
This is a Surprise 6, an F5B ship, after losing its wing in a high G turn. Lucky no-one got in its way - it went in in the middle of our runway.

Being a nice chap, I bought the wreckage - the wing is a work of art and completely intact. It will fly again soon.

/ Jonas
Jul 14, 2002, 05:10 PM
Electric Addict
downeym's Avatar

how about onboard video?


I had a catastropic radio hit while flying my zagi after work a couple of weeks ago. Luckily I had a wireless video camera strapped to the nose. Nothing like recording the carnage for posterity!


Video


Thread Tools