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Nov 30, 2021, 07:36 AM
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Tile saw as a mini table saw for wood


Hello all,

I would like to ask if any of you use a converted tile / glazing saw for modeling saw? Maybe someone would like to share comments. I have such a saw, power of 450W, about 3000 rpm. Blade diameter 180mm. I would like to replace the blade with one for cutting wood with about 60 teeth and convert the table to one with guides and a ruler for cutting at angles.

What do you think about it? Maybe some of you have such a project made?

I wanted to buy Chinese saws, but there is a problem with blades (unusual sizes) and power. They are just weak.

Thanks for help.
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Nov 30, 2021, 08:50 AM
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AA5BY's Avatar
Does the tile saw have existing blade height adjustability? While not a strict requirement of a table saw, it would seem important, especially for safety reasons on a saw used for modeling where adjusting the blade height to minimum required of a cut is a safety factor.
Nov 30, 2021, 09:18 AM
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there is no, but I want to adjust the height of the working table (the motor itself is rigidly mounted). The work table will be made of 20mm plywood with milled guides.
I'm just afraid if 3000 rpm will not be too low for cutting in thin plywood or strips.
Nov 30, 2021, 11:29 AM
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AA5BY's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSWD
there is no, but I want to adjust the height of the working table (the motor itself is rigidly mounted). The work table will be made of 20mm plywood with milled guides.
I'm just afraid if 3000 rpm will not be too low for cutting in thin plywood or strips.
3,000 rpms is fine.... in fact about right. If a scheme to adjust the table height is found... it ought to work well. It is a matter of being a whole lot safer if the cut height can be limited to only what is needed.
Nov 30, 2021, 04:40 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
I used a tile saw for a while for some tile jobs in the new digs. I too thought about using it for a model airplane table saw. But I went with just using my 10" table saw with a thin kerf 7 1/4" circular saw blade instead since I already had the table saw for my wood working.

The tile saw for model use would be fine for power and speed with a 7 1/4 thin kerf blade. And in fact there's a couple of YT videos on folks using tile saws to cut wood that support the idea that such a saw would be just dandy for model type use. By all means watch them for proof that the saws are powerful enough.

But please don't copy some of the material handling I saw which was very sketchy from a safety standpoint.

I'd also second the idea that you would want to come up with some way to adjust the height of the blade for safety reasons. It could be a hinged sub table added to the existing top or it could be a whole new hinged top on the old base.

Or perhaps just a couple of drop on "spacers" of different thicknesses that fit to the existing top to provide 5/8" blade exposure for one and another which limits exposure to about 5/16". The first would work for up to 1/2" thick stock and the second would be nice for use on thinner stock up to 1/8" thick.

One aspect of the tile saws which is pretty feable is the rickety rip fence that comes with them. I'd put making up a better rip fence as a very close second in priority right behind coming up with a way to adjust the blade exposure.
Nov 30, 2021, 08:24 PM
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Thank you guys for the advice, I have something to think about.
Dec 04, 2021, 09:15 PM
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This discussion is most interesting .....


as strip wood prices are too much for me. I used to have access to a nice Craftsman 10" table saw With a plywood blade (many fine teeth & freshly sharpened) that cut very nice strip-wood, accurately, & very smooth too. now I have access to a Delta (brand) 10" table saw that leaves strip-wood rough, (hardly worth the effort). I sure miss milling my own strip-wood, It was really nice to be able to do my own strip-wood, now I only mill larger stuff like maple motor mounts, as the small cuts are far too rough. The less expensive table saws these days aren't very good at all. Laramie.
Dec 04, 2021, 11:20 PM
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AA5BY's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laramie
as strip wood prices are too much for me. I used to have access to a nice Craftsman 10" table saw With a plywood blade (many fine teeth & freshly sharpened) that cut very nice strip-wood, accurately, & very smooth too. now I have access to a Delta (brand) 10" table saw that leaves strip-wood rough, (hardly worth the effort). I sure miss milling my own strip-wood, It was really nice to be able to do my own strip-wood, now I only mill larger stuff like maple motor mounts, as the small cuts are far too rough. The less expensive table saws these days aren't very good at all. Laramie.
Yep... some of the table saws have some arbor run out that can cause roughness of a rip.

I might suggest however that maybe you gave up too easily. Consider the purchase of a hollow ground planer blade.

It has no set and no carbide teeth, so use it on balsa only so as to keep it sharp. Do not let it touch any plywood as the glue will dull it. Do not use it for any hardwood. Treat it nice and it will please you by ripping balsa with an as if it was planed cut.

It is hollow ground, meaning the sides are ground with relief towards the arbor so that it is thickest at the teeth where there is no set to them. While if one is careful they rarely need sharpened, they are not hard to do so.
Dec 05, 2021, 04:58 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
If the saw has some blade runout or some end float in the arbor then it really won't matter what blade is used. the finish will always be terrible I'm afraid. So the bigger issue is to start out with a table saw which has a well shaped and correctly made arbor with no play.

I'm getting a finish straight off a Freud Diablo 7 1/4" 60T finishing blade which is nice enough on spruce, pine or balsa that is build ready with no gains to be had from any sanding. But I've also got a pretty nice cabinet maker's style table saw that I use with that blade. Tile saws and some lower cost contractor's saws might not be as nice. But if that is the case I think we'll find that the finish is rough for any and all blades.
Dec 05, 2021, 06:05 PM
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AA5BY's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMatthews
If the saw has some blade runout or some end float in the arbor then it really won't matter what blade is used. the finish will always be terrible I'm afraid. So the bigger issue is to start out with a table saw which has a well shaped and correctly made arbor with no play.

I'm getting a finish straight off a Freud Diablo 7 1/4" 60T finishing blade which is nice enough on spruce, pine or balsa that is build ready with no gains to be had from any sanding. But I've also got a pretty nice cabinet maker's style table saw that I use with that blade. Tile saws and some lower cost contractor's saws might not be as nice. But if that is the case I think we'll find that the finish is rough for any and all blades.
Bruce... the arbor run out when using a planer blade doesn't present near the problem as exist with a carbide blade because having no blade set, the run out is contained.
Dec 06, 2021, 01:06 AM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
With our softer and usually thinner materials in model building though I'm thinking that the planer blade won't perform like it does with thicker cabinet and other more bulky wood working. "We" just don't provide the same supportive surfaces for the blade to work with and slightly but significantly flex like intended to make up for any wobble or end play in the arbor. Would a saw with a bit of seating wobble or some slight bearing end play work better with the planer blade? I'm sure it would. But I suspect with our balsa or thin plywoods it would still leave a surface that needed some additional treatment.... Or it would wobble and cut a bigger than intended kerf simply due to any wobble or play that makes it bounce around. At that point it would be up to what is going on with each saw.
Jan 05, 2022, 08:51 AM
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kenh3497's Avatar
My old Craftsman table saw had the original crappy fence that was barely usable. I joined a wood working forum to ask questions about what would be a good replacement.



Well.... That lead to a whole slew of changes to the saw and learned that set up is very important to a clean cutting saw. Using the miter slot as a reference the blade should be adjusted as close to parallel to the miter slot as possible. Then the fence should also be adjusted in the same way. After replacing the arbor bearings and making the needed adjustments the saw has never cut so good.

The web site.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/

And specifically the power tools section.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/foru...-machinery.12/


Enjoy.


Ken
Jan 05, 2022, 04:47 PM
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Roguedog's Avatar
I'm using my band saw for triangles and strips.

I have been contemplating using my old blue Ryobi 18v for a table saw though. It spins a 4200RPM so plenty of speed.

You can get an 18V 33A power supply for $33 on Amazon to power it.
Jan 06, 2022, 05:00 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Ken, it sure does make a huge difference! The only thing just as bad is a direct motor or the blade arbor with loose bearings so the shaft wobbles or has end float.

here's a little something I made up a bunch of years ago to aid with checking and setting up my own saw.... It's only got the range of movement of the slots plus the 1" stroke of the gauge's pin but that's enough.

I used it originally to check on the blade to slot parallelism and also with the blade withdrawn to check for the rip fence being and staying parallel with the slots. I also use it for thin strip precision cutting up to 1.5" width. It came in super handy for making precision hardwood strips to fit the slots for use in making cross cut sleds. So it's proven to be far more than just a setup tool. So much so that I dedicated a cheap dial gauge to the cause instead of using it then taking the jig apart and tossing the wood portion into the back of a drawer.
Jan 11, 2022, 04:20 PM
Registered User

That's very .....


..... trick! Laramie.


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