What the Heck Wednesday - Mig 29 Crash

This week on What the Heck Wednesday we have a submission from RCGroups member radfordc and his Mig 29 EDF Jet Crash.

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Over 2 minutes of Crashes

This week on What the Heck Wednesday we have a submission from RCGroups member radfordc and his Mig 29 EDF Jet Crash. Here's his explanation on what the heck happened.

"As the takeoff began I realized that the flaps were not down. I glanced down at the Tx to find and flip the flap switch. While I was doing this the plane yawed left slightly and headed for the tall grass. Before letting the plane gain enough airspeed I yanked back on the elevator. Just then the nose wheel hit a bump and the nose was pitched up. The combination of bump and elevator caused the plane to over rotate into a vertical attitude at too low airspeed for the elevators to be effective in recovery. The Mig 29 also has a low thrust line motor setup which causes the jet to pitch up at low speed/high power. Holding full power I had no control over the plane and it just tried to keep climbing vertically until a stall was immanent. Chopping the throttle kept the plane from getting higher, but caused the immediate stall and vertical descent."

Mig crash (0 min 18 sec)

The good news here is that radfordc was able to repair the plane get it flying again.

If you have a video of a weird or entertaining crash and would like to be featured on What the Heck Wednesday, please send me a PM with your submission.

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Feb 10, 2021, 10:19 AM
DFC~ We Do Flyin' Right
Vapor Trails's Avatar
LOL what a longwinded explanation from the pilot!


This line said it all:
" Chopping the throttle kept the plane from getting higher, but caused the immediate..."

Pilot Error- should have flown higher, should have nosed down to avoid stall, and most definitely- should not have chopped throttle... chalk it up as experience. Next time don't shoot yourself in the leg by eliminating thrust.

Feb 10, 2021, 11:04 AM
Registered User
These mig's have a history of crashing, read up more on the foamy EDF forums. They had a tendency to lose elevator control and dive to the ground during a fast pass.

However, this was on takeoff, he pulled up too hard and stalled. Pilot error.
Feb 11, 2021, 08:34 AM
Registered User
radfordc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vapor Trails
Pilot Error- should have flown higher, should have nosed down to avoid stall, and most definitely- should not have chopped throttle... chalk it up as experience.
Please explain how I "should have nosed down"? The elevators were ineffective (no airspeed or prop blast over them). The jet thrust line is angled so that at full power it keeps pushing the nose up. And, climbing higher wasn't an option either...the plane had stopped climbing just at the instant I chopped power.

So, what exactly was the better course of action?
Last edited by radfordc; Feb 11, 2021 at 08:47 AM.
Feb 11, 2021, 08:37 AM
Registered User
radfordc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bandetlol
However, this was on takeoff, he pulled up too hard and stalled. Pilot error.
Exactly right! The sudden pitch up combined with the nose getting bounced up caused the plane to over rotate. Once that happened there was no way to get the nose back down.
Latest blog entry: Assembling a Spandau kit.
Feb 11, 2021, 09:53 AM
Registered User
In the future you need to be able to find your switches on the the transmitter with out looking get familiar and also get in a habit of allways using the same switch locations for certain functions such as throttle cut flaps flight modes and so on. All comes with flight time and experience all good carry on. Yogi
Feb 11, 2021, 10:16 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by radfordc
Please explain how I "should have nosed down"? The elevators were ineffective (no airspeed or prop blast over them). The jet thrust line is angled so that at full power it keeps pushing the nose up. And, climbing higher wasn't an option either...the plane had stopped climbing just at the instant I chopped power.

So, what exactly was the better course of action?
Keep the power on and do a loop? Just kidding. Hahaha
Feb 11, 2021, 10:55 AM
Registered User
Angelo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by radfordc
So, what exactly was the better course of action?
Doing a proper pre-flight, where you check all the flying surfaces, including the flaps? Not looking at your transmitter during the takeoff roll and continuing the takeoff, lifting off at a higher speed? Aborting the takeoff when you saw there was a problem?
Last edited by Angelo; Feb 11, 2021 at 11:04 AM.
Feb 11, 2021, 01:20 PM
DFC~ We Do Flyin' Right
Vapor Trails's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by radfordc
Please explain how I "should have nosed down"? The elevators were ineffective (no airspeed or prop blast over them). The jet thrust line is angled so that at full power it keeps pushing the nose up. And, climbing higher wasn't an option either...the plane had stopped climbing just at the instant I chopped power.

So, what exactly was the better course of action?
Your so right, you gave up flying it and killed your throttle at the perfect moment- nice job!
Feb 11, 2021, 02:13 PM
Registered User
To much elevator on takeoff put it into rocket launch mode. Then broadside in to the wind . Not enough power to pull out. Next the stall and the tumble to the ground. The rocket launch without enough power is almost always a disaster that ends in a sad way.
Feb 11, 2021, 02:40 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vapor Trails
LOL what a longwinded explanation from the pilot!


This line said it all:
" Chopping the throttle kept the plane from getting higher, but caused the immediate..."

Pilot Error- should have flown higher, should have nosed down to avoid stall, and most definitely- should not have chopped throttle... chalk it up as experience. Next time don't shoot yourself in the leg by eliminating thrust.

It's well known now that this plane can lock into a high alpha position at full throttle at low airspeed and this is what happened as explained by the OP who fully knows now where it went wrong after thinking about his experience. Be great if we all knew everything all the time but most of us don't and have to learn from our mistakes and if generous to others share the experience. Of course some know everything and are happy to belittle as well.
Feb 11, 2021, 03:11 PM
Registered User
paracanary's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by radfordc
Please explain how I "should have nosed down"? The elevators were ineffective (no airspeed or prop blast over them). The jet thrust line is angled so that at full power it keeps pushing the nose up. And, climbing higher wasn't an option either...the plane had stopped climbing just at the instant I chopped power.

So, what exactly was the better course of action?
With Futaba and others you can program a default takeoff configuration so that the TX will not link to the plane if the flaps are not set, the wheels are up or all switches are not in takeoff position. So the crash could have been prevented because the plane would not take off in a non default condition. If you fly a lot , it is easy to get lazy and miss a switch here and there. Let the transmitter to it for you.
Feb 11, 2021, 04:37 PM
Registered User
radfordc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yogi1
All comes with flight time and experience all good carry on. Yogi
Experience, huh? Let's see I started flying RC in 1964....so maybe any day now I will have the knack?

You make a good point about standardizing the switches on the Tx. That's something I've always done. The flap switch is the same for every plane I own. You would think I could find it...right?
Latest blog entry: Assembling a Spandau kit.
Feb 11, 2021, 04:40 PM
Registered User
radfordc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelo
Doing a proper pre-flight, where you check all the flying surfaces, including the flaps? Not looking at your transmitter during the takeoff roll and continuing the takeoff, lifting off at a higher speed? Aborting the takeoff when you saw there was a problem?
Good points, all! To be honest, this is the first time I've crashed a plane due to pure pilot error in a long while. No matter how long you do this stuff you still get a dumb thumb from time to time.
Latest blog entry: Assembling a Spandau kit.
Feb 11, 2021, 04:43 PM
Registered User
radfordc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by raydar
It's well known now that this plane can lock into a high alpha position at full throttle at low airspeed and this is what happened as explained by the OP who fully knows now where it went wrong after thinking about his experience. Be great if we all knew everything all the time but most of us don't and have to learn from our mistakes and if generous to others share the experience. Of course some know everything and are happy to belittle as well.
Thanks raydar. It's sometimes hard to show your dirty laundry in public. There are plenty enough people to quickly point out your faults. Maybe someone else will learn from my mistake.
Latest blog entry: Assembling a Spandau kit.


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