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Apr 30, 2006, 02:04 PM
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Apr 30, 2006, 07:44 PM
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RCDuggiedug's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by flybike
I think it would be fun to mount something like 50 komodo motors all along the leading edge. The only problem with this is that I need as much weight as I can get up in the very front. hmm Can you imagine the sound of 50 little 10 inch props?
You could glue 1000 horse flies to the LE. They already have free flight fly powered. You could do the first RC Biggest foam/fly powered plane.

RCDuggiedug
May 18, 2006, 09:32 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by flybike
I think it would be fun to mount something like 50 komodo motors all along the leading edge. The only problem with this is that I need as much weight as I can get up in the very front. hmm Can you imagine the sound of 50 little 10 inch props?

you could convert it to a tri motor just to get it to fly. mount a horizontal bar across the firewall that the outer two motors will mount to.

this way:

all of your weight will be up front where you need it
the prop area of the outer two motors will not be blocked by the fuse
wiring will not be significantly longer
probably the same overall weight
little additional cost.
ease of construction (probably framed up with pine)


once you get it to fly on land you need to put floats on it.......
Jun 12, 2006, 10:45 PM
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Flybike, how's Big Floyd coming?
Jul 20, 2006, 08:46 PM
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Maybe soon...
Quote:
Originally Posted by flybike
Jul 25, 2006, 10:28 AM
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ercoupe's Avatar
http://www.makezine.com/blog/archive...red_plane.html
World's first battery-powered plane flies in Japan.

-I think they mean human carrying.
Jul 26, 2006, 04:32 AM
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kushal_22's Avatar
Looks like they got GWS to make them there Prop!

Regards
Mal
Jul 26, 2006, 09:12 PM
RMS
RMS
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Jul 27, 2006, 01:06 PM
Got shenpa?
flieslikeabeagle's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kushal_22
Looks like they got GWS to make them there Prop!
Hey Mal, good to run across one of your posts again! Its the weirdest thing, my wife and I both find ourselves missing Kamloops, even though we've only spent a few days there. We both wish we could be there again!

Back to the propeller, I remember reading about the attempts to make a human-powered airplane back in the late 1970's and early 1980's. The propeller turned out to be crucial - there was barely enough power available from the pilot, and an inefficient propeller would not permit flight at all. The MIT aircraft, Chrysalis, used a propeller designed by an MIT professor, Eugene Larrabee, who came up with the concept of minimum induced loss propellers, and wrote ground-breaking research papers on the topic.

Later Paul Mcready and his team were trying to win the second Kremer prize with his aircraft the Gossamer Albatross, but were not even close to their goal until someone told McReady about Eugene Larrabee and his work on minimum induced loss propellers. A new propeller was designed based on Larrabee's principles, and the human-powered airplane not only flew, but took the Kremer prize.

The same thing happened again the Daedalus, which crossed the Aegean Sea in 1988.

This is why the propellers of all these planes - anything that has barely enough power to fly - tend to look alike. They are all based on Prof. Larrabee's work!

Most of us know that an elliptical wing planform (like the one on the Spitfire) has less drag than any other wing shape. I'm no aerodynamics expert, but my understanding is that Prof. Larrabee was the first to realize that this was no longer true for a propeller - because the tip of a propeller moves faster than the root, the elliptical shape is not the optimum shape. He then figured out what the correct planform for minimum drag on the propeller blades was...and voila, there was the "minimum induced drag" propeller!

Here's a short 'Web article on the man who, as much as anyone, made human powered flight possible:
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2003/o...abee-0129.html

-Flieslikeabeagle
Last edited by flieslikeabeagl; Jul 28, 2006 at 01:12 PM.
Jul 27, 2006, 07:48 PM
fix-it-up chappie
tolladay's Avatar
Here's another thread on this same topic, with a few interesting comment by Mark Drela.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=545012
Jul 28, 2006, 01:42 PM
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kushal_22's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by flieslikeabeagl
Hey Mal, good to run across one of your posts again! Its the weirdest thing, my wife and I both find ourselves missing Kamloops, even though we've only spent a few days there. We both wish we could be there again!

Back to the propeller, I remember reading about the attempts to make a human-powered airplane back in the late 1970's and early 1980's. The propeller turned out to be crucial - there was barely enough power available from the pilot, and an inefficient propeller would not permit flight at all. The MIT aircraft, Chrysalis, used a propeller designed by an MIT professor, Eugene Larrabee, who came up with the concept of minimum induced loss propellers, and wrote ground-breaking research papers on the topic.

Later Paul Mcready and his team were trying to win the second Kremer prize with his aircraft the Gossamer Albatross, but were not even close to their goal until someone told McReady about Eugene Larrabee and his work on minimum induced loss propellers. A new propeller was designed based on Larrabee's principles, and the human-powered airplane not only flew, but took the Kremer prize.

The same thing happened again the Daedalus, which crossed the Aegean Sea in 1988.

This is why the propellers of all these planes - anything that has barely enough power to fly - tend to look alike. They are all based on Prof. Larrabee's work!

Most of us know that an elliptical wing planform (like the one on the Spitfire) has less drag than any other wing shape. I'm no aerodynamics expert, but my understanding is that Prof. Larrabee was the first to realize that this was no longer true for a propeller - because the tip of a propeller moves faster than the root, the elliptical shape is not the optimum shape. He then figured out what the correct planform for minimum drag on the propeller blades was...and voila, there was the "minimum induced drag" propeller!

Here's a short 'Web article on the man who, as much as anyone, made human powered flight possible:
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2003/o...abee-0129.html

-Flieslikeabeagle
HA! Great to hear from you too!

I had a grewat time even though my health was not the best. We(Tom chris MR.Callingridge Mom dad and I Still talk about that supper and wonder how you and your wife are doing. I knew you were alive as i saw a post every once in awhile.

Happy to hear from you

Regards
Mal
Jul 28, 2006, 01:50 PM
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Canada Goose's Avatar
Still lurking here to see how Pink Floyd is coming along...what a project!

Keep us all posted as to any news and good luck...

Mike
Aug 14, 2006, 01:53 PM
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pilot89's Avatar
Any updates?
Aug 14, 2006, 02:48 PM
Registered User

Need any help???


flybike,
If you need any help with the project/first flight, let me know!
I'm in Madison and REALLY want to see this thing fly. I work in TV and can pretty much guarantee lots of coverage, possibly national...

Dennis
Aug 25, 2006, 08:48 PM
I get high on flying!
Hans, whats the latest?? Have you started back up at school yet? We want to see some progress with this monster!!

Steve


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