Thread Tools
May 04, 2005, 11:37 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP

The Fokker Scourge


In July of 1915 while flying a Fokker E.I Eindecker, Lt Kurt Wintgens downed his first enemy aircraft. What makes this feat memorable is that it was the first of many air combat victories attributed to the Fokker Eindeckers models E.I through E.IV. And what made these aircraft so successful was that they were the first to use a reliable synchornizing mechanism that allowed the machine gun to fire through the propellor arc. Thus began a year-long ravaging of Allied aircraft that became known as the "Fokker Scourge".

Now, with that little preamble done, I would like to present here a build thread of the Peter Rake designed, 48 inch wingspan, S400 powered Fokker E.III Eindecker. I know there are already a couple threads on the 36 inch version of this aircraft and this version builds pretty much the same. However, I feel you can't get too much of a good thing While the 36 inch versions were built from kits, there is no kit available for the 48 inch version, so this is a scratch build from plans.

I started this build with the fuselage. In true Peter Rake fashion the fuselage is made up from two subassemblied, fore and aft, that are normally attached to each other after they are completed. The Eindecker, however presented a unique problem in this respect that I will address later.

I began by making a "kit" for the forward section of the fuselage. One thing to note in the photo is that the firewall, seen in the middle-left, is rectangular in shape. On the plan it has a curved top for the upper fuselage sheeting. This has to do with the aforementioned problem.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
May 04, 2005, 11:46 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
The first parts to assemble are the slotted braces for the undercarriage and the top pylon. On the plan they are left as seen in the first photo and used as guides for their respective wires. Being a belt and suspenders type of guy, I changed this a little bit. In the second photo I put the proper size wire in the slots and then filled the rest of the slots in with balsa. In the third photo I sanded the balsa level with the braces and then put a plywood cap over the whole lot to make sockets for the wires.
May 04, 2005, 11:49 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Here I glued the firewall and rear bulkhead to one side of the fuselage. Note that the rea bulkhead is built up for balsa sticks.
May 04, 2005, 11:54 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
I then attached the other side of the fuselage and glued in the lite ply crossmembers for the UC. Note that with my rectangular firewall I can pin the fuselage flat to the board which makes squaring up this assembly much easier.

That's it for tonight. More to follow...

Larry
May 04, 2005, 11:59 PM
BDR
BDR
Just plane obsessed
BDR's Avatar
Hooray! This is just the kind of inspiration I need to get restarted on my PR 36" Elll. Got the tail built but not covered. Started getting puzzled over some of the little details. I'll be following this closely. Are you building a one piece model?
May 05, 2005, 12:00 AM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDR
Are you building a one piece model?
At least until the first flight

Larry
May 05, 2005, 05:37 AM
Registered User
vonJaerschky's Avatar
Nice Lnagel. Does this design have wing warp, or ersatz ailerons, or rudder only? I suppose making warping wings in this size would be pretty difficult. Go get'em!
May 05, 2005, 07:32 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Thank you VonJ. Actually, I'm very adept at making warped wings in any size

Control is rudder and elevator. I think it would be relatively simple to incorporate wing warping in this size. To do it on this design though would require a major redesign of the wings. As designed, they are cantalever and thus very stiff once covered, both longitudenally and torsionally. It would take an extremely large servo to warp them. Of course if you did make the wings fexible enough for wing warping, it would also require functional rigging.

Larry
May 05, 2005, 07:55 PM
Registered User
BennyLaird's Avatar
Be sure to throw a 1/10 scale Spandau on. I use the 1/12 scale from Wright Bros on the 36 inch version.

What probs with the tail BDR? I can help out if you are confused.
May 05, 2005, 09:53 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Hi Benny,
Well the full size has a wingspan of 32 ft and the model has a wingspan of 4 ft, so I make that about 1/8 scale. Also, from my research the Eindeckers did not use the Spandau, they used the 08 Standard Maxim with a lightened receiver. The Standard Maxim, as far as I can see, was made by Spandau, but it is a lot different in appearance from what we normally think of as a "Spandau".

edit: I just realized how nit picky that reply was. Sorry Benny, I do appreciate your comments. Of course, we've got to have a machine gun. Without it the plane might as well stay in the hanger. And we don't want no hanger queens, do we?

Larry
Last edited by Lnagel; May 05, 2005 at 11:33 PM.
May 05, 2005, 10:06 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
On with building the fuselage. The rear fuselage half is made from two built-up sides joined by crossmembers. Here is a photo of one of the sides being assembled.
May 05, 2005, 10:18 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
In my first post I had mentioned that there is a problem in assembling the fuselage. Well, this is it. Usually the rear fuselage sides have either a straight top or a straight bottom that makes it easy to pin the sides vertically to the building board when installing the crossmembers. As seen in the previous post's photo though, the E.III's rear fuselage is curved on both the top and the bottom.

Solving this was the main reason I made the top of the firewall flat. This allowed me to pin the front fuselage half upside down on the building board. I then attached the two rear halves to the front half and propped up the aft end of the rear half with a jig. I did this over the top view of the fuselage. Now it was a simple matter to install the crossmembers.
May 05, 2005, 10:29 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Now that the main fuselage was assembled I decided to tackle the nasty job of assembling the undercarriage. The UC is somewhat complex on this airplane. First I bent all of the wires to the proper shape per the plans. I then assembled the front portion of the UC as seen in the first photo. Then I plugged the front and rear parts of the UC into their respective holes on the bottom of the fuselage and rigged the interconnecting wires. I did all joints by wrapping with small guage copper wire and soldering.
May 05, 2005, 10:42 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
Now that everything that required the fuslage to be pinned to the board was done, I turned it right side up and glued on the top front formers. The front former is an integral part of the lite ply firewall on the plans, but as you've seen, I left this off and the new former is balsa. All it does is hold the front sheeting so it doesn't need to be ply.

You will also notice a vertical crossmember below the aft former. This crossmember has a couple 1/8 square balsa pieces glued at an angle. This is used to set up the wing dihedral angle. The wing spars protrude through the sides of the fuselage and under the angled balsa pieces. The spars are then glued to the crossmember. Pretty slick. It ensures a fool-proof dihedral angle. Of course, that's assuming the 1/8 square pieces are positioned properly
May 05, 2005, 10:43 PM
Senile Member
Lnagel's Avatar
Thread OP
OK, fuselage is almost done. Later...


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion The Fokker scourge epilot Scratchbuilt Indoor and Micro Models 1 Sep 27, 2006 06:48 PM
New Video: Fokker Scourge doc-e Parkflyers 11 May 23, 2004 01:38 AM