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Oct 12, 2020, 04:38 AM
Tony Audsley Retired Locksmith
Lockey's Avatar
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Thanks guys .. it seems to fly quite nice now .. that said .. not near as nice as the all foam version

Lockey
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Oct 12, 2020, 07:39 PM
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tspeer's Avatar
"Simplicate and add more lightness."
Gordon Hooton, Stout Metal Airplane Company
Oct 12, 2020, 11:39 PM
Tony Audsley Retired Locksmith
Lockey's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tspeer
"Simplicate and add more lightness."
Gordon Hooton, Stout Metal Airplane Company
Thanks for the words of wisdom Tom

Lockey
Oct 26, 2020, 11:26 AM
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tspeer's Avatar
I'm posting this here, because this thread concerns your locking system and development thereof.

Our club does a lot of float flying and I've been working on the design of a couple of flying boats. One of the perennial problems with flying boats is how to keep water from coming in through the battery hatch? The typical drop-in & secure with magnets approach isn't effective.

It occurs to me that I should slice off the top of the fuselage and use your locking design in the horizontal plane with a hatch that slides on from the front. The lugs will draw the hatch tightly onto the sill. Petroleum jelly should both lubricate the hatch and seal against water entry. Magnets at the back can keep it from moving forward, or I can pin it in place. I'm thinking an ADF antenna on the end of a vertical pin would work quite nicely if the cockpit is included as part of the hatch like with your revised Staggerwing.

With a twin engine flying boat, it's convenient to permanently mount the center wing to the fuselage and have a removable tail like your Staggerwing, plus removable wing panels outboard of the engine nacelles.

I'm thinking your removable fuselage segments can be made watertight. The holes for the lugs can be above the waterline. The former only needs holes for the lugs and to pass wiring through. Petroleum jelly would be in order for sealing, and there's a lot of former area between the holes and the exterior contour that would discourage water ingress. If water did get inside, then it would be easy to separate the fuselage and dump it out.

Do you think everything can be made watertight?
Oct 26, 2020, 01:01 PM
Retired CAD guy
birdofplay's Avatar
WATER is a force of Nature.

Don't mess with that MOTHER !

But seriously, Sometimes it's best to make allowances for the water to just PASS THU.
AKA ... Scuppers

I've had Sealed up hulls collect water and then they get TAIL HAVY on take off.
whereas a scupper would have alllowed all the Heavy water to easily exit.
Oct 26, 2020, 02:13 PM
Registered User
tspeer's Avatar
Good point. It would be straightforward to include in the print a double bottom that is above the waterline with a sump well that drains through the back side of the step. Each fuselage segment would have its own sealed bottom compartment. Infill in the bottom compartment would do a great job of making a strong bottom, allowing the topsides to be lighter.
Oct 26, 2020, 07:51 PM
Retired CAD guy
birdofplay's Avatar
There ya go !

Work WITH the H2O, not against it ;>}
Nov 01, 2020, 03:20 PM
Registered User
tspeer's Avatar
OK, further to flying boat hulls using Lockey's connection system.

I decided to run the deck level with the end of the V-bottom at the tail. That puts it about half way up the nose segment.

I'm going to use Lockey's spiral construction technique. Starting at top center, the shell will come down the outside to just short of the center of the keel, then double back on itself and run just inside the outer shell up to the deck. Then it will run horizontally to just short of the center plane, forming the deck, and descend down to the keel. The port and starboard vertical bits will fuse together to form the keel. That will form a single shell for the topsides and deck, with a doubled layer for the keel and hull bottom. There will be a sealed chamber on each side of the keel below the deck.

In keeping with Lockey's Taube approach, there will be a printed bulkhead that will seal off the bottom chambers and have holes in it for the locking lugs and through-fuselage access. I'll probably put in a radius where the inner wall doubles back along the outer wall so I don't have an acute corner into which the bulkhead has to fit. There were corners like that on the Staggerwing hatch, and I found it difficult to get a good fit because of tolerances in the printing.

OK, now that you have the general picture, here's my question. I want the bulkhead to completely seal the lower chambers, so I don't want to have any penetration for the locking lugs. What do you think of having the lugs only on the top half of the fuselage segment?

Now that I think of it, penetrating the bulkhead for the side where the lug is permanently installed would be OK because it would be sealed when the lug is installed. The problem is the hole on the opposite side. I think that could be solved by printing a pocket extension to the bulkhead that would make room for the lug. Then the lug would be going into a recess in the bulkhead, but the inside would remain sealed. What do you think of this option?
Nov 01, 2020, 03:34 PM
Registered User
tspeer's Avatar
BTW, I plan to make one other departure from Lockey's system. Instead of carbon tubes that run straight down the fuselage to lock the segments in place, I intend to use 2 mm carbon rods. They are lighter and a little flexible.

Instead of a deep web connecting the printed tube containing the straight carbon tube with the shell, I will use a stringer that is maybe a centimeter wide with the bulb at the inside edge for the carbon rod. The stringer will follow the longitudinal curve of the fuselage and the rod will curve to follow it as it is inserted.

The stringers, with their narrower webs, should be lighter than the deep webs of the Staggerwing and Taube and still provide adequate stiffening of the shell.


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