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Jul 07, 2020, 08:15 AM
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The iSDT SP3060 1800Watt Power Supply


Banggood sent me an iSDT P30 Dual 1000Watt charger and SP3060 1800Watt Power supply to evaluate. They are designed to work together but this review is about the former which turned out to be a very impressive power supply and could be of interest to any high-power charger owners. Power supplies over 1000Watts with voltages suitable for the big LiPo chargers are fairly rare. Converted computer server supplies are popular but this one is packaged expressly for the purpose in a very robust and practical case. It is both compact and stylish and a very rugged construction.

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Big thanks to Wilson from Banggood who arranged the review sample.
The power supply is currently US$268 and available from Banggood here:

https://ban.ggood.vip/UBhH

I have no affiliation whatsoever with Banggood but if you use the link above Wilson will get some credit for arranging the review samples.

iSDT design philosophy

iSDT have brought a fresh design philosophy to the normally fairly staid charger and power supply market. They have adopted an “Apple type” minimalist style and at the same time aggressively pursued very compact design footprints for quite powerful portable chargers.

They have done the same with this supply which is 50% more powerful than the (now discontinued) Turnigy 1200Watt 15-30V supply or the current Revo 24V, 50A supply but about the same weight and with a clever vertical design which optimises cooling with minimum noise.

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The iSDT minimalist style doesn’t always work, as in my opinion labelling and indicators on a charger or discharger should be clear and unambiguous, but in the case of this power supply it works well. The only control is an on/off switch and the only indicator a multi-coloured LED to tell you it is on and working correctly. Couldn’t get much simpler.

I have bought a bit of iSDT stuff in the past and regularly use their original SC608 and Q6 Plus chargers, the BC-8S battery checker, PC-4860 8S/40A parallel boards, and a couple of FD200 200Watt dischargers. All work well, are cleverly designed and have proved reliable. On the other hand, my D2 AC/DC charger and FD100 100-Watt discharger both failed without warning. On balance I like their innovative design approach and emphasis on compact design but my suspicion is that they sometimes walk too close to the thermal design edge in some of their products.

So how good is it?

First the published specifications:
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Note that the Banggood site states it has an XT90i output connector. It does not. As the specs say, it is an IC5. More about connectors later.

The base is only 110 x 115mm and as can be seen it matches the iSDT P30 charger nicely. That’s an iPhone X for size comparison.

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There is a small LED below the “GO” on the front which indicates operational status and, on the back, an On/Off switch, standard IEC C14 power cord receptacle and an IC5 output connector. The IC5 is mechanically compatible with the well-known EC5 EFlight connectors but has an additional small data pin between the two main 4.00mm bullet connectors.

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In the box is also a user guide, power cord and an IC5 and XT60i connector. XT60 is used as an input on many chargers and the XT60i and XT60 are mechanically interchangeable. In addition, mine came with a ready made IC5 to XT90i cable which connects the P30 charger

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Connectors and the BattGO system

This power supply is part of the iSDT BattGO range. BattGO is the trademark of a consortium of several vendors lead by iSDT which attempted to establish a range of “intelligent” LiPos, chargers and meters which could exchange data between one another using a third small connecting wire between the main power leads. The LiPos have an onboard battery management system board which sends all the battery characteristics and life history to chargers or meters and keeps track of the state of the battery. It is an attempt at a fully “plug and go” system for LiPos. The battery tells the charger what charge current it needs when you connect it. The XT60i and XT90i are fully mechanically compatible versions of the very popular XT60 and XT90 connectors. If you plug an XT60i plug into an XT60 socket or vice versa, the third wire is just ignored. This BattGO system is essentially the same as Spektrum’s “Smart” system, but Spektrum has developed it further to include speed controllers and telemetry data exchange. More importantly Spektrum changed from XT connectors to EC connectors which are compatible with their EFlight range of LiPos.

BattGO uses XT60i and XT90i connectors while Spektrum have used IC3 and IC5 to be compatible with their existing EC3 and EC5 EFlight packs.

The hardest part in this testing was finding any BattGO LiPos as only one German vendor sells them. Banggood no longer stock the Charsoon BattGO LiPos which were the only others I have seen to date. I am told iSDT intend to market their own brand of BattGo LiPOs in future. For now however BattGO LiPos are rare - hence the purchase of the cheapest Spektrum Smart LiPo that I could find and a couple of IC3 connectors. Another obstacle is that the XT60i connectors to make up the necessary adapters to the Spektrum pack are rare.

iSDT BattGO and Spektrum Smart – are they the same?

I haven’t been able to establish exactly what the history and relationship is between BattGO and Spektrum Smart, although someone on RCGroups who seems to be credible suggested Spektrum initially were part of the development group in the BattGO consortium but withdrew because of disagreements. Some of the Spektrum chargers look quite similar conceptually to iSDT ones. The new Smart S1500 and the iSDT T series for example. Whether Spektrum Smart chargers are OEM’d by iSDT I simply do not know. Spektrum have however maintained core parts of the data format because a BattGO charger identifies the Smart battery and charges it correctly. Also the BattGO USB linker works to display the Smart battery data on a PC if you make up a Smart IC3 to BattGO XT60i adapter lead.

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You need an iSDT third Generation product (the P30, 608AC, Q6 Nano, Q8, and Q8 Max chargers) a T8 1000W Smart Charger, or a BG-8S Smart Battery Checker in order to adjust the output voltage for all ISDT Smart power supplies. Importantly, note that the low-cost BG-Linker cannot make the adjustment. If you don’t have one of these BattGO chargers or the BG-8S to do the adjustment the PS3060 will operate at the default factory setting of 24V. At 24V and maximum current of 60 Amps the power output is 1440 Watts. You need to be able to increase the voltage to 30V to get the full available 1800Watt capacity.

The odd thing is that iSDT have put an IC5 connector on the back of the PS3060 where other iSDT BattGO products like the P30 charger uses XT90i. I suspect this is in recognition of the other big LiPo chargers in the market which come with EC5 connectors. iSDT supply the correct IC5 to XT90i cable with the P30.


I assume Spektrum have extended the concept so they could add in Smart ESCs as well. Spektrum Smart software is almost certainly not the same any more as BattGO software.

Functionality of the BattGO feature

If used as a “dumb” power supply the PS3060 will do what any good power supply does – supply current at a constant voltage up to the limits of its current and power capacity. The only function of the BattGO technology is to:
  1. Identify automatically an iSDT BattGO charger and set the input voltage automatically.
  2. Allow manual adjustment of the output voltage in 1 Volt increments. The default output is 24V unless you change it. The PS3060 specs says the output voltage can be adjusted between 21 and 29V while the voltage adjustment on the P30 charger when connected to the PS3060 has a scale from 20-31Volts. In practice I found the PS3060 can be set for voltages between 20 and 30Volts using the P30.

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You need an iSDT third Generation product (the P30, 608AC, Q6 Nano, Q8, and Q8 Max chargers) a T8 1000W Smart Charger, or a BG-8S Smart Battery Checker in order to adjust the output voltage for all ISDT Smart power supplies. Importantly, note that the low-cost BG-Linker cannot make the adjustment. If you don’t have one of these BattGO chargers or the BG-8S to do the adjustment the PS3060 will operate at the default factory setting of 24V. At 24V and maximum current of 60 Amps the power output is 1440 Watts. You need to be able to increase the voltage to 30V to get the full available 1800Watt capacity.

The odd thing is that iSDT have put an IC5 connector on the back of the PS3060 where other iSDT BattGO products like the P30 charger uses XT90i. I suspect this is in recognition of the other big LiPo chargers in the market which come with EC5 connectors. iSDT supply the correct IC5 to XT90i cable with the P30.

Design features

The design in my opinion is clever.
A power supply is about the most boring thing on the bench. All you want it to do is power on when you switch it on, keep running, and supply smooth regulated voltage quietly. It is however a lot more difficult to design a good high power supply than is commonly thought. There are a lot of subtle design considerations to ensure it delivers smooth clean well regulated power for long periods with no fuss.

It looks like iSDT have taken a standard 24v 1800Watt communications power supply, added control and variable voltage circuitry, put it in a very robust compact square section aluminium magnesium case with plastic end caps, and turned it vertically with a solid retracting handle on the top to lift it by. It is very nicely made. The vertical design allows for excellent convection assisted cooling boosted by a large fan which runs slower and is therefore quieter than the little screamers found in most server and communications power supplies. The fan reacts instantly to load and up to about 1000 watts is extremely quiet. Over about 1500Watts it starts to become significantly loud but is still quieter than any of the server supplies I have when operating at the same load.

LED indications

The LED on the front has 4 colours;
  • Normal operation is indicated by Green
  • A smart device connection is indicated by Cyan (light blue/green)
  • A warning is indicated by Orange
  • An abnormal condition (like shut down) is indicated by Red

Performance testing is in the next post.
Last edited by jj604; Jul 08, 2020 at 03:41 AM.
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Jul 07, 2020, 08:15 AM
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Performance testing


I tested the power supply by connecting it to a constant current load. This load is capable of sinking up to 2250 Watts of power while holding a constant current of between 1 and 220Amps at better than +/-0.2Amps. I normally use it for testing LiPos at high C rates and it has been well tried and calibrated.

How good is the Regulation?

The most important feature of a power supply is how good is the regulation? That is - as the load increases does the set voltage stay constant or does it sag?

Here’s the measured values on a graph for the SP3060 when set to a nominal 29V output over a current range of 0-60 Amps. That corresponds to a power range of 0->1740 Watts. 60 Amps is the specified maximum current and 1800Watts the specified maximum power. Voltage was measured at the input to the load using a 40,000 count calibrated DVM with +/- 0.025% accuracy.

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The voltage drops perfectly linearly from 29.065 at 0 Amps to 28.754 at 60 Amps. That is a drop of 311mV. This corresponds to a resistance of 0.311/60 = 5 mOhms which is about what the leads and connector will be in total. In other words, this power supply is maintaining perfect regulation when using the internally measured output voltage of the unit itself as the sense value.

In simple terms: the voltage is maintained absolutely constant up to the full specified current. Very impressive.


Ripple

The other thing you want in a power supply, apart from good regulation, is the absence of any significant ripple. That is, there should be no high frequency variation superimposed on the average DC output voltage. Here is the output at 50A constant current measured with a 10MHz scope. The vertical division scale is 0.5V so even at 29V and 50 Amps this supply shows less than about 100mV maximum ripple peak to peak. Again, very impressive.

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Efficiency

The stated efficiency is ≥ 93.2% with a 220VAC supply.
The Power factor is ≥ 0.99 at 50 Amp output and ≥0.98 at 25 Amps.

I have no simple way to measure either, but I have no evidence to doubt either figure. A power factor of 0.99 suggests good input power factor correction using decent quality power factor correction FETs like the FDL100N50.
The efficiency is fairly simple to evaluate in these big power supplies. If they aren’t very efficient they get very hot! More on that later.

How accurate are the specifications?

It’s not unusual with stuff in the hobby world to not meet its published specification. Anyone familiar with the C rating on LiPo packs knows this.

The specs given in the brief instruction sheet claim:
1) Output Voltage adjustable from 21 – 29V.
In fact, I was able to get stable output at 20-30V in 1 Volt increments.
Conclusion: Meets or betters specification.
2) Rated output current = 60 Amps
I was able to get a stable 60Amp supply at 29.73 volts. Increasing the current to 61 Amps caused the supply to shut down. It cannot be restarted without turning off the power which is an excellent safety feature.
Conclusion: Meets specification.
3) Output Power = 1800 Watts
The supply was stable at a current of 60 Amps and a measured output voltage at the load of 29.73 volts. This is a power at the load of 1784 Watts. The rest is accounted for by heating in the leads and connectors. Note that if you operate the supply from an AC source of less than 150V such as a domestic single phase 110V AC supply you can only get a total output power of 720 Watts. For full power you need a 220V AC supply.
Conclusion: Meets specification.
Efficiency and noise

Power supplies produce two unwanted by-products: heat and noise.
The amount of heat generated is a function of the efficiency of the circuit. The better the conversion of the input power into the output power the less the generated waste heat.
The amount of noise is a function of how efficient the cooling is to carry away that waste heat since the only practical way in these sort of power supplies is air cooling of the power FET heatsinks using a fan.

This particular design is clever and different from the usual large bench or computer server supply. The case is vertical rather than horizontal so the convection process is in harmony with the forced air cooling. In addition, the design allows a large square section fan that occupies almost all of the cross section of the case. The result is a large airflow with reasonably slow fan speed and consequently less noise. The specification states that the maximum working temperature is 45°C.

How well does it work?

I ran the supply at full load of 1800 Watts for 10 minutes at an ambient temperature of 20°C and the outlet airflow reached a stable 44°C and stayed there.
Conclusion: The cooling system for a power supply of this capacity is very effective.

No specifications are given for the noise level but fan noise was very low up to a load of about 1000 Watts then increased until at 1500 Watts I would describe it as fairly noisy but much less so than most computer server supplies I have used at the same load. Over 1500 Watts you probably wouldn’t want it close to you on the bench but it is not really irritating. People differ in their tolerance of noise but this supply is probably as good as you will get from an 1800 Watt air cooled unit. A step change in the load resulted in an instantaneous change in fan speed then a settling down which suggests an intelligent fan driving circuit that monitors both load and temperature.

Construction appears to be high quality with extensive strain relief and component support.

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Last edited by jj604; Jul 07, 2020 at 08:42 AM.
Jul 07, 2020, 08:16 AM
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Conclusions


This is a very well thought out power supply that delivers an honest 1800 Watts (on a 220V AC supply) reliably and quietly.

It has been designed to match the iSDT P30 Dual charger and does that extremely well with some headroom. The P30 is a 1500Watt maximum power charger with both channels working.

It is a plug and go solution for the big LiPo chargers like the Revo Powerlab8, Dual Revo Powerlab6, iCharger 4010 Duo or the iSDT P30. It won’t run the 2000Watt chargers at full power but comes close if you adjust the voltage to 30V. It has 50% more power than the typical 1200Watt hobby bench power supply if you don’t want to be bothered with converted computer server supplies. It has very good regulation and ripple and can be adjusted to between 20 and 30V output while delivering up to 60 Amps.

The BattGO features are fairly basic since that only serves to automatically set the output current to match a BattGO compatible charger. The P30 charger for example automatically sets the PS3060 to 29v output when connected. All the BattGo iSDT chargers have functionality to automatically identify and match the input power. If the input is higher than the charger output voltage the charger will automatically use buck mode and if lower it will use boost mode.

Because the output connector is EC5 compatible you can plug a Revo or iCharger straight in using their standard power leads.

If you want to change the output voltage from the as-supplied default of 24V you do need a BattGo device however. It is a pity that iSDT did not incorporate Bluetooth capability in this power supply as they have in all their recent chargers and dischargers. They have their “ISD Go” Apps available for MacOS, Windows, Android and iOS which would have been a simple no-cost way for the user to change the output voltage if they did not own a BattGO device.
Last edited by jj604; Jul 07, 2020 at 08:51 AM.
Jul 07, 2020, 08:17 AM
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Additional information


Reserved for additional information.
Jul 07, 2020, 10:19 AM
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Good job - thanks!
Jul 07, 2020, 04:14 PM
Registered User
Yes, it would have taken maybe $5 worth of additional hardware for this to act as a direct charger for

nominal 24V, 6-7S LI or 6-8S LFP packs

not just via BattGo, which I see as a dead end

but any packs with a simple interface

maybe even regulated by CAN Modbus, SMBUS, PMBus, I2C etc.

I assume it is current limited, not just OCP?
Aug 06, 2020, 09:17 AM
Registered User
Looks like two communications power supplies in series connection, and it's such a pity that P30 charger don't have regenerative discharge mode
Aug 07, 2020, 12:07 AM
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I agree.

I am fairly sure it is two of these in series with an iSDT designed control circuit that modifies the standard output..

http://www.szact.com.cn/pd.jsp?id=179

Here is a vendor of those MR241800LV supplies with an English website.

https://www.yoycart.com/Product/581541203590/

Note the picture of the model sticker.

Then compare with the sticker on one of the two supplies in my SP3060.

Too much of a coincidence for me.

John





Quote:
Originally Posted by Liujinlongljl View Post
Looks like two communications power supplies in series connection, and it's such a pity that P30 charger don't have regenerative discharge mode
Aug 08, 2020, 09:33 PM
Registered User
Does not seem to be something they are hiding?
Sep 10, 2020, 06:07 AM
MGU
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Hi,

I recently bought the same combo and I am seeing a "strange" issue. Turning on the power supply the light is green, but as soon as I connect a charger to it and start charging the light turns to Orange. Given the sparse documentation this is defined as a "work warning". I have seen one other video on youtube where the light is also orange during charging so I do not think there is a problem with my unit though.
Connecting the P30 it is a little bit different.
It starts green, turns cyan when I connect the P30 but after some time turns orange as well. After some time the charger emits a beeping noise and the light turns cyan again only to turn orange a few minutes later.

Did you observe this as well during your testing?
Sep 10, 2020, 06:23 AM
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I suspect it is to do with the battery.
If the battery is not a BattGo compliant one, the charger is not getting the data feed from the battery and passes this "error" info through to the power supply.

I have a Spektrum Smart LiPo which should pass the battery info to the P30 so will have a look at it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU View Post
Hi,

I recently bought the same combo and I am seeing a "strange" issue. Turning on the power supply the light is green, but as soon as I connect a charger to it and start charging the light turns to Orange. Given the sparse documentation this is defined as a "work warning". I have seen one other video on youtube where the light is also orange during charging so I do not think there is a problem with my unit though.
Connecting the P30 it is a little bit different.
It starts green, turns cyan when I connect the P30 but after some time turns orange as well. After some time the charger emits a beeping noise and the light turns cyan again only to turn orange a few minutes later.

Did you observe this as well during your testing?
Sep 10, 2020, 07:31 AM
MGU
MGU
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jj604 View Post
I suspect it is to do with the battery.

If the battery is not a BattGo compliant one, the charger is not getting the data feed from the battery and passes this "error" info through to the power supply.



I have a Spektrum Smart LiPo which should pass the battery info to the P30 so will have a look at it.
Thank you, can you confirm that you are seeing the same behaviour with a dumb battery? I do not care for the color the beeping noise on the field is just annoying.
Sep 10, 2020, 08:36 AM
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Will check that out sometime tomorrow. It is late here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU View Post
Thank you, can you confirm that you are seeing the same behaviour with a dumb battery? I do not care for the color the beeping noise on the field is just annoying.
Sep 10, 2020, 10:05 PM
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There appears to be no difference in LED display between a Smart battery and an ordinary LiPo.

On powering up the power supply LED is green.
It turns Cyan when the P30 has started up.
It then goes Orange a little while after the charge has started.

When the process is complete my P30 gives two beeps. I only checked this for a storage charge.

Here is the info I put in the first post which I got from iSDT.
The LED on the front has 4 colours;
Normal operation is indicated by Green
A smart device connection is indicated by Cyan (light blue/green)
A warning is indicated by Orange
An abnormal condition (like shut down) is indicated by Red
The Green and Cyan seem to be correct.
I think the Red will also be correct but I have not tried to initiate an abnormal operation.

I think there is ambiguity about what iSDT mean by "warning" for the Orange LED.

They might just mean "In operation". As in, the Orange LED tells you that the P30 is working correctly.

So you might rewrite the 4 conditions as:

At startup
The Power supply has started and is OK = Green
A smart device has been detected = Cyan

Once started
The Power Supply and Charger is working correctly = Orange
Something abnormal happened. = Red

You can turn off the P30 beeps altogether or change the end of operation beeps from repeated to once-only in the system menu.
Sep 10, 2020, 10:22 PM
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That might indicate that the power supply briefly lost the Smart data stream from the charger and then recovered it??

Just a speculation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU View Post
Hi,

I recently bought the same combo and I am seeing a "strange" issue. Turning on the power supply the light is green, but as soon as I connect a charger to it and start charging the light turns to Orange. Given the sparse documentation this is defined as a "work warning". I have seen one other video on youtube where the light is also orange during charging so I do not think there is a problem with my unit though.
Connecting the P30 it is a little bit different.
It starts green, turns cyan when I connect the P30 but after some time turns orange as well. After some time the charger emits a beeping noise and the light turns cyan again only to turn orange a few minutes later.

Did you observe this as well during your testing?
Sep 11, 2020, 01:22 AM
MGU
MGU
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I also did another test.
I created a new power lead and removed the signal wire. With this setup the light stays green all the time even if you start charging. With the signal cable connected it is as you say. You turn on green, then cyan and without doing anything it turns orange a few minutes later.

I will just use the "dumb" cable from now on to get rid of the beeps and I also contacted isdt for feedback.
Sep 11, 2020, 02:07 AM
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That makes perfect sense. Without the signal wire the power supply gets no information from the load (charger) and so just supplies a constant voltage up to its maximum current or power capacity.

I' think it will be a 24V supply when using a dumb cable, no matter what voltage you set it to using a Smart cable and the system settings.

Be interested to find out if you have the time.

John
.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU
I also did another test.
I created a new power lead and removed the signal wire. With this setup the light stays green all the time even if you start charging. With the signal cable connected it is as you say. You turn on green, then cyan and without doing anything it turns orange a few minutes later.

I will just use the "dumb" cable from now on to get rid of the beeps and I also contacted isdt for feedback.
Sep 11, 2020, 04:46 AM
MGU
MGU
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jj604
That makes perfect sense. Without the signal wire the power supply gets no information from the load (charger) and so just supplies a constant voltage up to its maximum current or power capacity.

I' think it will be a 24V supply when using a dumb cable, no matter what voltage you set it to using a Smart cable and the system settings.

Be interested to find out if you have the time.

John
.
Hi John,

Before owning the P30 I used the BH-8s battery tester to change the output voltage and this was a permanent change.
The P30 is a little different, it always sets this to 29V when connected via smart cable. During operation you can change this to 26V if you then unplug the charger and connect it via a dumb cable it stays that way. If you use the smart cable instead it will reset it back to 29.
Sep 11, 2020, 01:05 PM
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Nice thread, subbed!!
Sep 14, 2020, 04:49 AM
MGU
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Hi, a quick followup after a weekend out on the field with this combo.

The most hassle free setup I found was with a "smart" and a "dumb" power cable.
I used the smart one initially to set the output of the power supply to 29V (I did that at home). Out in the field I connected the charger via the dumb cable. The light was green all day and I did not get all the beeping noises I would normally have with the smart cable.

The charger itself worked flawlessly and charged my 6s batteries the whole day without any issues.
Since it was tucked below the desk in the shade I also used the mobile app every now and then to check the status of the charging process.

I did not get any reply from the ISDT guys regarding the bahivour I saw with the smart cable attached yet, but given me solution to use a non sensored cable I do not mind.
Sep 14, 2020, 07:07 AM
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Good technique.

I'm assuming the power supply stores its set output voltage in an EPROM and once it is set by a BattGO device it stays at that set level until another BattGo device is attached and sends it a new signal (indicated by the Cyan LED).

It comes from the factory set at 24V.
If you never connect a BattGO device it will stay at 24V.
If you connect a BattGO charger it will immediately adjust its output voltage to the value set in the charger system settings.
Until you next connect a BattGO charger with a signal wire it will stay at that value.

John
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU
Hi, a quick followup after a weekend out on the field with this combo.

The most hassle free setup I found was with a "smart" and a "dumb" power cable.
I used the smart one initially to set the output of the power supply to 29V (I did that at home). Out in the field I connected the charger via the dumb cable. The light was green all day and I did not get all the beeping noises I would normally have with the smart cable.

The charger itself worked flawlessly and charged my 6s batteries the whole day without any issues.
Since it was tucked below the desk in the shade I also used the mobile app every now and then to check the status of the charging process.

I did not get any reply from the ISDT guys regarding the bahivour I saw with the smart cable attached yet, but given me solution to use a non sensored cable I do not mind.
Sep 14, 2020, 07:14 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGU
Hi John,

Before owning the P30 I used the BH-8s battery tester to change the output voltage and this was a permanent change.
The P30 is a little different, it always sets this to 29V when connected via smart cable. During operation you can change this to 26V if you then unplug the charger and connect it via a dumb cable it stays that way. If you use the smart cable instead it will reset it back to 29.
Will the cell phone link work with the new ISDT P10 charger or is that just a smart function of the power supply?
Sep 14, 2020, 08:22 AM
MGU
MGU
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BACKEMFNRG
Will the cell phone link work with the new ISDT P10 charger or is that just a smart function of the power supply?
The link is only going to the p30 not the power supply. AFAIK the p10 has no Bluetooth support.

Sent from my CMR-W09 using Tapatalk
Sep 14, 2020, 03:20 PM
Registered User
Rats! Thank you.
Sep 18, 2020, 02:07 PM
Registered User
I apologize in advance if this isn’t the right place to ask this question but here goes anyways. I have an ISDT 300 w dc charger and an ISDT 200 w dc charger. Can I run the both off a 360w 12v 30 amp power supply . I won’t be charging more than 6 amps on each charger. Thanks in advance.


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