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Mar 09, 2020, 03:21 AM
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Mini-Review

Proxxon FET 2070 table saw: I tested It!


In recent weeks I have had the opportunity to try a particularly interesting work tool for model makers who love working with wood, namely the Proxxon circular table saw, the 2070 FET. Light compact (35 x 24 x 37.5 cm the dimensions for a weight of about 6 kg.) And easily positioned if necessary on any work surface and then to put it on a shelf, the FET allows you to cut not only wood or balsa but different materials such as plastics, plexiglass, fiberglass as well as non-ferrous metals (however, each material requires a dedicated cutting disc that stands out for the number of teeth present). Accepts blades from 50 up to 85mm in diameter. The machine comes with the 24-tooth blade excellent for wood and balsa.
The heart of this machine is a DC motor with a toothed belt transmission that is quite silent even if the "whistle" of the blade rotation makes itself heard. The blade can be tilted up to 45 į for diagonal cuts but has a cutting depth limit of 22mm, so if you intend to use it also for household chores keep in mind this limit.
But let's get to the "juice" of the question: I tried the machine to make both balsa strips and wooden blocks for reinforcements with beech and pine. I must say that the cut is particularly clean, but care must be taken to bring the piece close to the aluminum longitudinal guide; it seems trivial but if you have to make strips of a certain length (for example 80cm) when we start cutting the tablet after about twenty centimeters of cutting the piece will be off the work surface and care must be taken that this does not rotate compromising the precision of cut; which does not happen if we cut small pieces that do not come out of the work surface (among other things well done with a good thickness aluminum). This problem does not arise, however, for pieces to be cut larger in width as the Proxxon FET has on its left side an additional extractable work surface that allows you to rest the piece on a larger surface.
The same aluminum longitudinal stop guide slides on a graduated ruler and has a double stop: a small wheel that temporarily blocks the sliding but that allows you to make small adjustments with steps of 1/10 of a millimeter through a graduated knob placed at the start of the measuring ruler, and a lever stop that definitively locks the stop and I have not found any play once the two blocks have been tightened.
What created some difficulties for me, however, is the readability of the measurements on the graduated ruler (at least it did this to me ...). If you need to make angled cuts instead, a transverse guide is also provided with an aluminum ruler and scale with degrees of inclination useful for the series production of pieces of equal angle and length.
When cutting wood at the maximum thickness allowed, the saw does not create problems and the rotation of the blade does not undergo worrying slowdowns, a sign that the 0.2Cv motor is sufficient for machining, even if when working with pieces on the edge of the blade you notice a little effort in advancing the table which can compromise the stability of the machine which weighing 6 kilos does not have a sufficient mass to counteract an energetic check. However, the small size (30x30cm) allows it to be placed on the work bench without problems.
If you need to replace the blade, the Proxxon FET 2070 has a practical system that allows you to raise and lock the table and the motor unit for replacement or for cleaning the saw. And here I have to open a separate chapter: when cuts are made, the processing material due to the rotation of the blade is almost entirely discharged into the machine body (the compartment under the work surface where the motor is placed) and therefore eliminate the sawdust produced (among other things very fine) it is necessary to raise and block the work table; alternatively an aspirator can be connected to the saw using the rear union and a rubber adapter that is supplied with the machine. I connected it to a vacuum cleaner bin but to be honest I noticed that not all the residues are sucked but the sawdust remains in the machine body and must therefore be eliminated by hand ...
Before starting to cut, it is recommended to install the tilting blade cover on the work surface to protect yourself from inadvertently touching the blade while the machine is running, and a plastic pusher that allows you to push the piece towards the blade safely: this it is not a simple accessory to use for those who are beginners because I have repeatedly lost the grip on the piece I was cutting with consequent alignments in the cut.

Il mio filmato Proxxon FET (3 min 34 sec)
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Mar 10, 2020, 06:53 PM
Registered User
Sandro,

I have no hands on experience with any micro table saw but I've had several decades of such experience with a full sized cabinet saw and have, in the last couple of days looked at some YouTube videos on Proxxon FET ts as well as reading the online instruction manual.

Proxxon does not emphasize a basic safety rule with table saws: no free hand cuts; all sawcuts must be with the workpiece snuggly held against the rip fence (what Proxxon calls the longitudinal stop guide) or the mitre gauge (Proxxon calls a transverse guide/stop) or some fixture attached to either.
On the Proxxon video you posted at :20 to :24 the demonstrator is doing a freehand crosscut; you can actually see the workpiece wobble side to side a bit. In the Proxxon manual, while at one point it says the workpiece should be guided along the longitudinal stop with a slight pressure, in the closing tips/safety notes, nothing emphasizes no freehand cuts.

Why no free hand cuts? One can do them safely with a bandsaw or scroll.
A band saw or scroll saw has only one cutting action.
A round table saw blade cuts thru the workpiece at two different locations: the intended sawing action occurs at the front of circular blade, with the teeth moving forward and down. The teeth at the rear of blade are also moving thru the workpiece, with a forward and upward motion. There is no safety issue as long as these rear teeth are moving in the kerf or groove created by the front teeth. But if the movement of the workpiece is not perfectly straight thru the blade circle, the rear teeth will catch on solid wood on either side of the kerf. At best, a wriggly sawcut or the blade stalls (perhaps shredding the drive belt on a micro ts)

But also possible are safety issues of finger amputation or kickback of workpiece against the operator.
When the rear teeth snag on wood, the UPWARD and forward motion acts to lift the workpiece and throw it forward against the blade guard and operator. If blade guard comes apart, the operator's fingers may be drawn into the spinning blade in the general chaos; if part of workpiece is "cleanly" projected forward, it may hit the operator.
Given the relatively small workpieces to be cut by a micro tablesaw and its significantly lower power than a full size ts, an inadvertent contact of fingers in the spinning blade from a blowup of the blade guide/workpiece is probably the higher risk.

Personal note: I have placard above my table saw that reads "2.035 teeth pass thru my fingers before I can react".
My saw uses a 10" diameter blade and I probably used a 80 carbide tooth veneer blade in doing the above warning. Probably with 200 watt micro ts and a 24 tooth, 4" blade, only a few dozen teeth will act on one's fingers. But even with a low powered micro ts, you are dealing with sharp carbide teeth, not 10 inch wood prop.

Please do look at the YouTube videos posted by "hokdk1"/Harris Knudsen.dk, for another review of this saw and his shopmade upgrades.
Also google "table saw featherboards"...… these fixtures are used routinely on full sized saws and the most frequently used ones ride in the mitre slots, pressing the workpiece against the rip fence, providing, amongst other benefits, a "third hand", allowing the operator to reposition his other hands during a long sawcut. Such a featherboard can be shopmade.

I use my table saw a lot in general workworking.
But for model making, apart from making construction jigs/fixtures, the only use is making multiple, uniformed sized wood spars; for this job, no other machine works for me.
There are few parts of a model plane that involve straight and parallel cuts - which is what the table saw excels at - and even with something like a perfectly rectangular firewall, I use a scroll or band saw and a bit of sanding as the wastage of pricey aircraft plywood is less.

Enjoy your micro ts and take care,

Michael in Ontario, Canada
Last edited by 2michaely; Mar 11, 2020 at 01:06 PM.
Mar 11, 2020, 01:19 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2michaely
Sandro,

I have no hands on experience with any micro table saw but I've had several decades of such experience with a full sized cabinet saw and have, in the last couple of days looked at some YouTube videos on Proxxon FET ts as well as reading the online instruction manual.

Proxxon does not emphasize a basic safety rule with table saws: no free hand cuts; all sawcuts must be with the workpiece snuggly held against the rip fence (what Proxxon calls the longitudinal stop guide) or the mitre gauge (Proxxon calls a transverse guide/stop) or some fixture attached to either.
On the Proxxon video you posted at :20 to :24 the demonstrator is doing a freehand crosscut; you can actually see the workpiece wobble side to side a bit. In the Proxxon manual, while at one point it says the workpiece should be guided along the longitudinal stop with a slight pressure, in the closing tips/safety notes, nothing emphasizes no freehand cuts.

Why no free hand cuts? One can do them safely with a bandsaw or scroll.
A band saw or scroll saw has only one cutting action.
A round table saw blade cuts thru the workpiece at two different locations: the intended sawing action occurs at the front of circular blade, with the teeth moving forward and down. The teeth at the rear of blade are also moving thru the workpiece, with a forward and upward motion. There is no safety issue as long as these rear teeth are moving in the kerf or groove created by the front teeth. But if the movement of the workpiece is not perfectly straight thru the blade circle, the rear teeth will catch on solid wood on either side of the kerf. At best, a wriggly sawcut or the blade stalls (perhaps shredding the drive belt on a micro ts)

But also possible are safety issues of finger amputation or kickback of workpiece against the operator.
When the rear teeth snag on wood, the UPWARD and forward motion acts to lift the workpiece and throw it forward against the blade guard and operator. If blade guard comes apart, the operator's fingers may be drawn into the spinning blade in the general chaos; if part of workpiece is "cleanly" projected forward, it may hit the operator.
Given the relatively small workpieces to be cut by a micro tablesaw and its significantly lower power than a full size ts, an inadvertent contact of fingers in the spinning blade from a blowup of the blade guide/workpiece is probably the higher risk.

Personal note: I have placard above my table saw that reads "2.035 teeth pass thru my fingers before I can react".
My saw uses a 10" diameter blade and I probably used a 80 carbide tooth veneer blade in doing the above warning. Probably with 200 watt micro ts and a 24 tooth, 4" blade, only a few dozen teeth will act on one's fingers. But even with a low powered micro ts, you are dealing with sharp carbide teeth, not 10 inch wood prop.

Please do look at the YouTube videos posted by "hokdk1"/Harris Knudsen.dk, for another review of this saw and his shopmade upgrades.
Also google "table saw featherboards"...Ö these fixtures are used routinely on full sized saws and the most frequently used ones ride in the mitre slots, pressing the workpiece against the rip fence, providing, amongst other benefits, a "third hand", allowing the operator to reposition his other hands during a long sawcut. Such a featherboard can be shopmade.

I use my table saw a lot in general workworking.
But for model making, apart from making construction jigs/fixtures, the only use is making multiple, uniformed sized wood spars; for this job, no other machine works for me.
There are few parts of a model plane that involve straight and parallel cuts - which is what the table saw excels at - and even with something like a perfectly rectangular firewall, I use a scroll or band saw and a bit of sanding as the wastage of pricey aircraft plywood is less.

Enjoy your micro ts and take care,

Michael in Ontario, Canada

Hello
It is true that the circular saw can be dangerous but all circular saws are dangerous. These Proxxon is intended for those who want to make cuts of balsa strips, wood tablets, various thicknesses etc. If you need to make freehand cuts, buy a band saw ...
In the manual, express reference is made to safety and each of us must be aware of the dangers ...
Mar 14, 2020, 10:25 AM
Registered User
mhodgson's Avatar
Truth be told, ALL tools are potentially dangerous when used incorrectly. Power tools more because of how quickly things can happen.
Used correctly and with appropriate guards, eye protection etc then they fine.
Whether the tool is worth the cost is another matter altogether and only the user can answer that one.
Mar 14, 2020, 04:36 PM
A man with too many toys
I had a micro table saw a number of years ago. Don't remember the name but the main problem was the motor power. I was always bogging down the motor. That's why I got rid of it.
Mar 15, 2020, 07:36 AM
Registered User
Just a few points regarding table saws. Picture number 3, IMO, is a setup for a kickback. Canít make it out too clearly but the workpiece appears to be riding between a fence on the left and a fence on the right. That is a NO NO. When using a table saw one side of the workpiece must be free. Typically you use the fence on the right with the workpiece free on the left. If using a fence on the left, the fence on the right is removed or moved away from the workpiece. In picture 3, I would not use either fence to make the cut on that narrow piece. I would use either fence to position the workpiece for the cut. Then move the fence away and use the miter gauge to make the cut. NO FREE HAND CUTS ON A TABLE SAW.

If using a feather board to assist with the cut, setup the feather board before the blade. I set mine up about ĹĒ before the blade.

Iíve had one kickback. I was to testify at a trial the following day. So my head was not totally clear. Canít remember if it was the table saw or radial arm saw. I forgot to set a lock. Workpiece kicked back, dislocating my right thumb. Trip to ER. Another mistake: offered pain killer or just reset it. I chose to just reset it and will never forget that day. Then it got infected and I needed surgery on my thumb. A lot of pain for not being clear headed and careful. Still, I was lucky. It could have been worse.
Feb 26, 2021, 08:22 PM
Registered User
I just purchased this saw, have been using it last two weeks. I really like it, will only be cutting balsa with it.
There is a slight design flaw Iíll post a picture. The black tension handle is higher than the table. do it hits longer pieces.

Can you guys post some pics of feather boards your talking about on this saw? Iíve never used them and would like to. Thx!
Last edited by JBG7676; Feb 26, 2021 at 09:47 PM.
Feb 27, 2021, 07:37 AM
Registered User
Do a google search for tablesaw featherboard and you'll see all kinds of images for them. I made several and also bought one or two. Make one in miniature for your Proxxon saw.

carl
Feb 27, 2021, 09:39 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlgrover
Do a google search for tablesaw featherboard and you'll see all kinds of images for them. I made several and also bought one or two. Make one in miniature for your Proxxon saw.

carl
Is there a best way to secure to saw or is it just a matter of trial and error with bolts n washers?
Thx.
Feb 27, 2021, 06:37 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBG7676
Is there a best way to secure to saw or is it just a matter of trial and error with bolts n washers?
Thx.
The most common way is to anchor a featherboard that exerts side pressure on the workpiece to keep it against the rip fence is to use the miter gauge slot in the table as a location.

As Carl as suggested google something along the lines of "diy table saw featherboard".

You can also use such a featherboard as a reference point in sawing identical width spars

If the table top is steel you could embed a couple of supermagnets in the bottom of a diy featherboard and locate it on top of the table..... a couple of supermagnets of sufficient size (1/2 - 1") would create enough of a bond between the featherboard and steel surface to prevent the fingers of the featherboard from moving.

Consider investing in a good (full size) table saw book such as Jim Tolpin's Table Saw Magic

Michael in Ontario, Canada
Last edited by 2michaely; Mar 07, 2021 at 10:48 AM. Reason: added "is" between "fence" and "to use the miter gauge slot"
Mar 01, 2021, 09:45 AM
Registered User
Lookup "Benchdog Feather Loc". Inexpensive featherboard that clamps within the mitre gauge slot. Also pretty inexpensive.

For the homemade featherboard fan, just clamp them down to the table with whatever kind of clamp you have on hand.

Carl
Mar 03, 2021, 01:53 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
The way that locking handle is sticking up is a deal breaker.

I'm suspecting that something is not set up right. Perhaps the guide bar that the rip fence clamps to is set too high? Or the rip fence itself is not assembled quite right? Either way that needs to be corrected.

The ruler has a tapered gap due to the mis-assembly. If you take the ruler away does the rip fence have a similar tapering gap? that would indicate that there's an error in how the rip fence and rip fence guide bar is assembled.
Mar 06, 2021, 11:43 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMatthews
The way that locking handle is sticking up is a deal breaker.

I'm suspecting that something is not set up right. Perhaps the guide bar that the rip fence clamps to is set too high? Or the rip fence itself is not assembled quite right? Either way that needs to be corrected.

The ruler has a tapered gap due to the mis-assembly. If you take the ruler away does the rip fence have a similar tapering gap? that would indicate that there's an error in how the rip fence and rip fence guide bar is assembled.
Thank you, I agree. Iíll look into that. I did email Proxxon and they said theyíre sending me some parts? Weíll see.

I donít like how the fence is only supported on one end. However for the light balsa Iíll be cutting should be fine.

Another reason I went with Proxxon over MicroLux, I had a microLux small disc Sander was very poor quality. I have a Proxxon chop sae and itís high quality. So I took the leap on the Proxxon.
Mar 06, 2021, 01:48 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
It's not unusual even in bigger saws to have a rip fence that only locks on one end even if there's a slippery support button that rides on a rail at the far end. My full size 10" saw does the same thing. Like you say, just don't push hard. If you need a lot of force to keep the wood in contact with the fence then the saw is not set up correctly. There's a lot of YT videos on basic alignment of a table saw. Same principles apply. Blade must be parallel to cross cut guide grooves to within a very fine degree. Then the rip fence gets tweaked to be parallel to the grooves and thus the blade to a very fine degree as well. Without confirming those two settings none of the rest will go well at all.

On the small saw like this I'd be looking for the blade to be parallel to the table grooves to within plus or minus something less than .005" from one end of the blade to the other. So time to break out a set of calipers to take the measurement. A ruler and our poor quality Mk I eyeballs aren't good enough if you want the best results.

On the other hand for the rip fence if you can feel down to the edges being in alignment our finger tips can often feel steps as little as .002". But since you have the calipers out anyway you can also use them to check the rip fence to table slot for parallel.

For giggles I looked up the Proxxon FET for price. Looks like it's $700'ish for saw and shipping at the cheapest. That makes it up there with the rather lovely Byrnes table saw.
Mar 06, 2021, 04:30 PM
ƃuᴉʇɐǝʞ ʇʇoɔs
vulturetec's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMatthews
For giggles I looked up the Proxxon FET for price. Looks like it's $700'ish for saw and shipping at the cheapest. That makes it up there with the rather lovely Byrnes table saw.
That price sounds way off. Don't know what the situation is north of the border, but they were under us$400 on Amazon for a long time. Proxxon US has them listed for us$328 (but out of stock) - most of their stuff says free shipping in the US. A seller on Amazon has them for us$425 (free shipping).

From what I've read there's no comparison between it and Byrnes. A more similar product to the Proxxon is probably the Microlux.

Every time I think I need one of these (Proxxon or Microlux) I talk myself out of it.


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