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Feb 26, 2020, 11:49 PM
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Feb 26, 2020, 11:50 PM
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For dx9 I use the throttle stick for both flap and throttle. I use 5 flight modes. Use throttle lockout on all but launch mode. I go to the camber system for the landing mode and put the ‘Input’ as throttle. Then in landing mode the throttle will control the flaps and ailerons along with the motor. Sliders switches are good options but I like using the throttle stick as I find it simple to use. It even worked good on 6 servo wing set up. Spektrum has a good set up for the system as it is easy to program. just wish the receivers were as good.

Art
Feb 27, 2020, 12:58 AM
What you looking' at fool!
GlidingFool's Avatar
I've got a full house powered ship with the throttle stick set up as follows:

Centre to Top Throttle = 0 to 100% power
Centre to Bottom Throttle = 0 to 100% crow
Programmed dead zone = no action+/- 10% of centre

So - put throttle stick at middle prior to powering up model.

When I want to go faster / up, I push the throttle stick forward. When I want to go slower / down, pull throttle back.

Works for me . . .

On a Taranis. ( Oh and I stole the program so don't think I am smart! : )
Feb 28, 2020, 04:08 AM
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Essex BOF's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miami Mike
The purpose of a motor is different on an r/c glider than on an r/c airplane. You don't fly a glider around with the motor running at variable throttle settings; instead you make a quick, full-power climb to altitude, shut off the motor, let the prop blades fold, and glide.

So with a mode 2 radio, your flaps and/or crow control belong on your left stick and your motor control belongs on a switch or slider, preferably with a separate arming switch. The left stick is normally configured so that stick up is normal flight and stick down is flaps down.
Have used this method for years, now would not use anything else. Actually, changed from my old MPX 3030, because I could not devise a way of fitting a slider on the side of Tx, due to the split case.
On the Taranis, as I fly Mode 1, the L H slider on the side of Tx, SF switch is used to arm. I find this comfortable as being R H, Tx is held in left hand whilst launching right handed, as I have never used a neck strap or tray for Tx. On the MPX, had to operate throttle stick with my chin, as the throttle stick was on the right, not the best way but got by for some years, as was reluctant to swap MPX for another type of Tx.
Also most RC aircraft take off from ground, so Tx can be held in both hands.
Mar 04, 2020, 10:47 AM
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Essex BOF's Avatar
As described to me some years ago now that the motor/throttle control on the stick, has the same function with a glider. Bringing it back, slows the model down, forwards increases the speed.
On the MPX 3030, as I had no option than to use the throttle stick for both motor & spoilers/crow braking, if I wanted to be able to control the two functions, progressively. Groveling around to locate one of the sliders was not an option as was not using a switch, which would be fully on or fully off. So on the 3030, there is a 3 position memory switch, where by I set up with it forwards for motor, middle was an idle phase where the stick was neutral, then with switch back it became a crow brake operation.
It needed care as to making sure you were in the right position, for either operation. For this reason I find it is far better to have crow braking on the stick, with the motor control on the L H slider switch,plus an arming switch, to avoid any forgetful moments
So apply power, launch, throttle back or flick arming switch, then bring throttle back, to avoid arming with the throttle still in its power position.
I have found that I can use partial crow as an aid to thermaling as well as having set positions on a 3 position switch
Picture of launching in a comp last year, using the Taranis, without neck strap as described.
Mar 04, 2020, 11:33 AM
turn, turn, turn.
For me, when I'm holding the radio with one hand and launching with the other hand, it's easier to just flip a switch or push a button, rather than move the slider/throttle stick forward.
Mar 05, 2020, 04:04 AM
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Essex BOF's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Sharp
For me, when I'm holding the radio with one hand and launching with the other hand, it's easier to just flip a switch or push a button, rather than move the slider/throttle stick forward.
Most guys over here flying F5j, like to have the motor control so as to use the 30 second motor run allowance to search for lift, so a an on/off switch does not allow for this. It is just as simple to arm motor, push slider to approx half throttle & launch.
Mar 05, 2020, 07:16 AM
turn, turn, turn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Essex BOF
Most guys over here flying F5j, like to have the motor control so as to use the 30 second motor run allowance to search for lift, so a an on/off switch does not allow for this. It is just as simple to arm motor, push slider to approx half throttle & launch.
Yep...F5J is different.
Mar 05, 2020, 07:45 AM
Registered User
To the original poster: do as is more comfortable to you. Me and most of my flying pals all have the motor on a stick and brakes on a switch to avoid confusion when switching to power planes. On pure gliders yes, we have the braking on a stick
Cheers
Mar 05, 2020, 09:06 AM
2 infect U it 1st has 2 find U
Miami Mike's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joao
Me and most of my flying pals all have the motor on a stick and brakes on a switch to avoid confusion when switching to power planes. On pure gliders yes, we have the braking on a stick
That's weird; those two sentences contradict each other.
Latest blog entry: A short message...
Mar 05, 2020, 11:05 AM
Registered User
On electric gliders we use the primary controls as in an airplane (motor on the throttle stick) , with a switch to activate the brakes (along with the elevator compensation mix etc)

On pure gliders the throttle stick controls the airbrakes.

I once programmed a switch to alternate the throttle stick to operate the brakes in position 1 and the motor in position 2 but found it not very convenient.
Mar 05, 2020, 11:11 AM
Registered User
For example, in this failed landing at the slope, it was needed a very quick surge of the motor, so the trottle stick controlling the motor was great

In fact I didn“t even had time to retract the raised ailerons, but it worked nevertheless and the model landed on the next attempt.

Onthe slope things happen very quickly . If I only practiced flat field flying on an comfortably large space. probably would choose the conventional operation of the brakes with the trottle stick in electric gliders.

My 0.01 euros ! Cheers
Mar 05, 2020, 11:44 AM
2 infect U it 1st has 2 find U
Miami Mike's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joao
On electric gliders we use the primary controls as in an airplane (motor on the throttle stick) , with a switch to activate the brakes (along with the elevator compensation mix etc)

On pure gliders the throttle stick controls the airbrakes.
And that's to avoid confusion?
Latest blog entry: A short message...
Mar 05, 2020, 02:38 PM
DS Junkie
Screamin' Eagle's Avatar
There may not be a right or wrong way, but there are certainly better ways and worse ways.

Someone above raised a good point. When launching a motorized glider (say with your right hand if you're right handed), the transmitter is in your left hand. It's a heck of a lot easier to have the motor control on a switch on the left hand side of the transmitter than to try to move the throttle stick or the left slider with one hand. Try it and you'll see.

I always wondered why on some videos I'd see people struggling to get the power on while holding the plane in one hands. Even saw one guy moving the stick with his teeth.

I guess it comes down to whether you think you need proportional throttle control or whether full on/full off works for you. When I fly my electric glider, the purpose is to use the motor nly to climb to altitude. In that case, no proportional throttle control is necessary. Plus, in case of emergency, like stalling low above a tree-line, do you want to mess with having to flip a switch and then remembering where your slider is or having to goose the throttle?
Mar 05, 2020, 02:44 PM
Registered User
"And that's to avoid confusion? "

Indeed it is. If I am flying a pure glider my brain is wired not to look for a motor anyway, so no confusion to me, albeit the reasoning might sound somewhat lacking. For me it works .
Regards
Joćo


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