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Feb 22, 2020, 12:04 AM
Compulsive battery charger
genix's Avatar
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How did you learn to fly 3D?


...or what's the best way to learn new 3D maneuvers? I can hover, torque roll, rolling harrier, snap roll....and that's about it.

Where do I look? YouTube? Books? Simulator? Just play until I discover something by accident?

YouTube videos have been okay for learning what a maneuver is supposed to look like, but stick movements are very difficult to follow. I haven't found any great tutorials.
Last edited by genix; Feb 22, 2020 at 12:15 AM.
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Feb 22, 2020, 12:20 AM
Team Extreme Flight
Doc Austin's Avatar
You're gonna need Scott stoops' book. Mastering radio Controlled Flight

And hopefully you'll find this helpful.... The New Sport Pilot's Guide To 3D
Feb 22, 2020, 11:16 AM
Crazy 3D
Crazy 3D's Avatar
The way I learned flying 3d was practicing in the Sim, every day , practice and practice to develop muscle memory and watching the Pros videos ,then I went to the flying field , and after 9 years flying 3D Im still doing that
Feb 22, 2020, 11:43 AM
Addicted to 3DHS, EF and Flex
3Daddict's Avatar
Scott Stoops book is helpful. I learned by trial and error, a lot of crashes and persistence. And a very good foamy equipped with the best electronics available at the time. My suggestion to you is to get Scott Stoops book and a good foamy from Twisted Hobby and have fun. You will first need to learn precision flight though. Knife edge in both directions, 4-point rolls, slow rolls both in both directions. And then start to learn harrier in both upright and inverted. After that hovering, then the rest will start to fall in place with time and practice.
Feb 22, 2020, 04:21 PM
San Antonio TX.
sensei's Avatar
I learned by trial and error over 20 years ago, there were no foamy’s back then. I learned most of it on the first Real Flight version, my 40% Aerowoks Edge 540 and my 40% Carden Cap 232.

Bob
Feb 22, 2020, 06:21 PM
Registered User
By wrecking a lot of planes.
Feb 22, 2020, 06:45 PM
jofro
Quote:
Originally Posted by genix
...or what's the best way to learn new 3D maneuvers? I can hover, torque roll, rolling harrier, snap roll....and that's about it.

Where do I look? YouTube? Books? Simulator? Just play until I discover something by accident?

YouTube videos have been okay for learning what a maneuver is supposed to look like, but stick movements are very difficult to follow. I haven't found any great tutorials.
Practice-practice and more practice, I find from my own experience the more I practice the luckier I get.
Feb 23, 2020, 07:47 AM
Registered User
I'll start by saying I still suck at 3D, but I'm having fun!

Been flying forever, and always enjoyed the landings. Over and over again, each judged by myself. Still do that. Anyway, focus became how slow I could get the plane to fly prior to touching down, then how long I could hold it off the runway (this a result of a lot of full scale messing around with landings as well). That led to Harriers, then KE flight. Eventually I found the need for a more specialized plane and went through a ton of those looking for something that worked - for ME (Edge hands down winner here).

I hate sims. 15 minutes is about as long as I can stay serious on one. That said, I've seen plenty of evidence proving that if you can keep yourself entertained on one, the stick time spent doing that can really pay off, and stick time is what it take to fly 3D.
Feb 23, 2020, 11:43 AM
Team Extreme Flight
Doc Austin's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahicks
I hate sims. 15 minutes is about as long as I can stay serious on one. That said, I've seen plenty of evidence proving that if you can keep yourself entertained on one, the stick time spent doing that can really pay off, and stick time is what it take to fly 3D.
Don't treat it seriously or expect it to be "real." I just treat it like it's a video game and that keeps it fun. I also like to join the online sessions and fly with people from all over the world. That keeps it fresh too. It's not the same thing as flying for real, but you gotta keep it fun or you'll lose interest.

Speaking of online, Realflight 7, 8 and 9 online sessions are all grouped together now, so if you have 7 or better there's plenty of sessions to join.
Feb 23, 2020, 01:16 PM
Registered User
Doc, spent 25 years messing with computers for a living just prior to retiring (second career). Though I know there are some of those techies that get into games even after screwing with them for 8 or 10 hours at work, I was NOT one of them. Never got into games of any kind. If I did find myself messing with a computer after work, generally it was over a problem at work that was bugging me, or investigating something I knew nothing about but would help me do something I wanted to get done.

Bottom line, other than some casual browsing and catching up on friendly email, sitting at a keyboard after hours felt like being on a busman's holiday. If I want to fly, the field isn't that far away.... Can have a plane in the air within 15 minutes.
Feb 23, 2020, 06:10 PM
jofro
It is more than 30 years since I started to reduce the lengths of radio sticks by about half of the stock.
Ever since my flying skills improved exponentially especially in 3D flying.
Feb 24, 2020, 10:22 AM
Registered User
Buy more batteries, fly a bit higher, and practice practice practice.
Feb 24, 2020, 10:54 AM
Team Extreme Flight
Doc Austin's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahicks
Bottom line, other than some casual browsing and catching up on friendly email, sitting at a keyboard after hours felt like being on a busman's holiday. If I want to fly, the field isn't that far away.... Can have a plane in the air within 15 minutes.
If you can fly for real that's always better.
Feb 24, 2020, 04:20 PM
Lower!
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Daddict
I learned by trial and error, a lot of crashes and persistence. And a very good foamy equipped with the best electronics available at the time. My suggestion to you is to get Scott Stoops book and a good foamy from Twisted Hobby and have fun. You will first need to learn precision flight though. Knife edge in both directions, 4-point rolls, slow rolls both in both directions..
Very good advice I wish I'd known back in about '08 when I was really getting back into the hobby after 20yrs. Wish I'd started with an EPP foamie (not crunchy 40-size balsa and Depron), and even though I'd throw in an occasional slow-or-4 point roll, that also is very good advice I wish I'd practiced more. No less than Colton Clark (awesome 3D flyer) has also given this advice before on the precision practice. Sim is good too, but nothing like harriering and hovering a foamie 10' away from you (so you can see and make quick corrections). Good luck!
Feb 28, 2020, 09:18 PM
Flying every chance I get!
Micubano's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Austin
You're gonna need Scott stoops' book. Mastering radio Controlled Flight

And hopefully you'll find this helpful.... The New Sport Pilot's Guide To 3D
I laughed a little when I saw $106 for Stoop's book. I searched a little and found out the kindle edition is free if you have Kindle Unlimited. I look forward to reading it. Thanks!


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