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Feb 07, 2020, 12:31 PM
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What kind of spray for add weight on balance props?


I have a wood props. I've already balance by add weight with hobby spray can to it Mr.Color/Tamiya Clear glossy and also add CA for hub. Look good already and test with engine test stand for now. (But now I broke it, will change new props and balance again soon...)

Then I think. Does the spray paint will gone with fuel or not? Or I think too much, no need concern? What king of spray paint you do for add weight? I prefer not to sand wood props.
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Feb 07, 2020, 12:33 PM
Still gassin' it.
Paint on the propeller is hardly affected by fuel in my experience.
Any decent paint, laquer or varnish can be used as long as it is compatible with the material of the propeller.
Feb 07, 2020, 03:19 PM
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You can also swipe the light half of the prop with thick CA to balance or you can sand the front of the heavy side.

carl
Feb 08, 2020, 09:25 AM
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I prefer not to sand wood props. For CA on prop maybe good. It think spray might be neat than CA?
Feb 08, 2020, 11:01 AM
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earlwb's Avatar
Using a clear varnish would work. But I think balancing would be a somewhat slow process though. You have to apply some paint then wait for it to dry for a while and redo as needed. Not a bad idea though.
Latest blog entry: yes I still fly airplanes too
Feb 08, 2020, 12:28 PM
WCB
WCB
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I use clear nail polish on mine. Use a blow dryer to speed drying between coats.
Feb 08, 2020, 04:09 PM
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I sand wood props to get rid of the markings and to balance. Next, label the pitch and diameter on the hub. Then stain, paint tips if needed and varnish. When dry varnish can be added to balance if needed.
Feb 08, 2020, 07:06 PM
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Prop paint


I have used clear polyurethane spray bombs from the local hardware store for years. Spray the back of the light blade. To balance the prop: take a piece of 3/16" round rod or a phillips screwdriver. place the centre of the round rod under the centre hole in the prop on a flat surface. Roll the rod back and forth while looking straight down the hole. Now roll the rod back and forth so the prop teeters back and forth. The heavy blade will have the smallest gap when you are rolling towards that blade. The biggest prop I balanced this way was seven feet long from my ultra-light aircraft.

Kip
Feb 08, 2020, 08:03 PM
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SeismicCWave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by WCB
I use clear nail polish on mine. Use a blow dryer to speed drying between coats.
I use nail polish to seal the seams on my iron on covering. They may have change the nail polish formula because it does not work anymore. The nail polish turned frosty after getting fuel and oil on it. So no I do not recommend using nail polish to balance prop.

Pretty much any household paint from hardware store should work fine. The trick is to let the paint cure for a few days before getting fuel on it. I would let it cure for a week. I have done some tests on various paints on different fuel (Methanol, Ethanol and gasoline. None with nitromethane though.) The result is similar with various paint. If I rush and get fuel on any of them within the first couple of days they will rub off. Let them cure for a week they stay put.
Feb 08, 2020, 11:37 PM
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exf3bguy's Avatar
I used to paint my giant scale props with a auto base/clear. I would balance as best I could while spraying the clear and then fine tune with 600 grit after the clear was dry. After fine tuning the balance, I would polish back to a high gloss.
Feb 09, 2020, 12:21 AM
Still gassin' it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by earlwb
Using a clear varnish would work. But I think balancing would be a somewhat slow process though. You have to apply some paint then wait for it to dry for a while and redo as needed. Not a bad idea though.
I was surprised that it actually was not that hard. I bought 4 props in the 20~22" range to experiment when I started messing with the radial.
The first one took some time, trial and error, waiting for the paint to dry etc etc (the evaporation of the solvents really reduces the weight of the paint layer)
but after I had done 2, the remaining two became fairly easy to estimate how much "overweight" to add in order to end up about right.
Of course you never hit it in one go, but the first one I had to add a bit of paint 5 or 6 times, the last one needed only one touch up after the initial balancing.
Feb 19, 2020, 11:15 PM
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Thread OP
I end up with car/motorbike spray "Samurai k1k-clear". It 1K spray that adv.
-Petrol and engine oil resistant
-Weather resistant
Should be good. Spray fine not so course. Cheap and nice weight as well.
I think it better for job than model spray like tamiya.
Feb 20, 2020, 12:28 AM
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SeismicCWave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nquantum
I end up with car/motorbike spray "Samurai k1k-clear". It 1K spray that adv.
-Petrol and engine oil resistant
-Weather resistant
Should be good. Spray fine not so course. Cheap and nice weight as well.
I think it better for job than model spray like tamiya.
Good for you. I don't think Tamiya paint is fuel proof anyway. Tamiya paint is mostly for plastic models and electric RC cars and trucks. I used them to paint my electric foamies.


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