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Feb 13, 2020, 04:45 PM
Registered User
The larger TD ports are for better performance. The Texaco was for a special event that required a long engine run with a huge prop and a bigger finned head because they would overheat. The reedy Bees I believe had SPI until the muffled Quiet Zone ones came out later. Maybe in the 1980s? I think the slotted ones were like a spark arrestor. My examples seem to run just as well as the open exhaust port. The single bypass on most of the Bees are pretty slow. I prefer the TD cylinder or at least the smaller two port bypass one. There is a Cox Engine Forum where the guys are more educated than me that will set you straighter maybe. Even doing a search would maybe answer some questions. They are a fairly good close knit group. I have been using them for 50 years but those guys are more up to date on the newer stuff. You seem to have the stuff to try out the throttle already. Just fire them up and go for it. Even the SPI ones will slow down with the throttles. With the low power of the reedies, they will likely fall out of the air with even a medium slow idle. The props are not that efficient at that size.
Last edited by aspeed; Feb 13, 2020 at 04:51 PM.
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Feb 14, 2020, 02:57 PM
aka Tony
Thread OP
Thanks Aspeed. Appreciate the info.
I do belong to the Cox forum, but tend to spend more time here.
Easier to post pictures here, to illustrate a point.
Quote:
You seem to have the stuff to try out the throttle already.
Yes, I think your right.
I need to get some reeds from Cox Int'l.
I want to take apart the engines that I have.
Check them out before firing them up.
Also need to find a source for Castor Oil.
Sig's is out. Been on back order for almost two weeks.
I have Champion 25% Nitro fuel that has 10% castor and 10% synthetic.
Should do fine for the older engines.
But wonder if I need to add a little castor for break in of new engines.
Also have a quart of Champion 5% nitro.
Thanks again.
Cheers!
Feb 14, 2020, 06:21 PM
A man with a plan
Balsaworkbench's Avatar
The Texaco engine is an interesting engine. It has the small ports for efficiency as mentioned earlier, so it's supposed to turn a bigger prop more slowly, and it has extra fins on the head for cooling. What it all adds up to is that you can put one on a Q-Tee or an old timer and it may have a slightly lower top speed but the large prop produces a very respectable climb rate, and of course it runs longer than a Black Widow. The Texaco is my favorite 049, because I'm not a speed freak. I always fly planes that are on the mellow side.

I tried the needle throttle about 20 years ago and I didn't like it much. It has to go right down the middle, so it takes up most of the valuable real estate in the nose section. I also found it to be not a very good throttle, all things considered. I'm pretty sure the exhaust sleeve yields superior results, as well as being less intrusive.
Feb 14, 2020, 07:39 PM
Registered User
crawf56's Avatar
My 2 cents...

I played with 049's back in 1979, then got back into them in the past couple of years......so I am pretty "newb-ish" too.

I have tried some of the Sleeve Throttles. They seemed less 'throttle', and more "on/off". Not a bad thing, especially when playing with a scale model.
Feb 14, 2020, 08:07 PM
///////
coriolan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsaworkbench
The Texaco engine is an interesting engine. It has the small ports for efficiency as mentioned earlier, so it's supposed to turn a bigger prop more slowly, and it has extra fins on the head for cooling. What it all adds up to is that you can put one on a Q-Tee or an old timer and it may have a slightly lower top speed but the large prop produces a very respectable climb rate, and of course it runs longer than a Black Widow. The Texaco is my favorite 049, because I'm not a speed freak. I always fly planes that are on the mellow side.

I tried the needle throttle about 20 years ago and I didn't like it much. It has to go right down the middle, so it takes up most of the valuable real estate in the nose section. I also found it to be not a very good throttle, all things considered. I'm pretty sure the exhaust sleeve yields superior results, as well as being less intrusive.
Agree with that having used the ACE sleeve on TD's, works better than the Tarno carb actually!
Feb 15, 2020, 09:59 AM
aka Tony
Thread OP
Quote:
The Texaco engine is an interesting engine. It has the small ports for efficiency
Does that efficiency also work for the other engines that Cox produced with the same slotted ports?
I read that the Texaco also had different fuel metering.
Quote:
I'm not a speed freak. I always fly planes that are on the mellow side.
At 82, I resemble that remark.
Quote:
it takes up most of the valuable real estate in the nose section
Did not think about that for my future builds.
I really enjoy building scale or stand off scale.
Most of my thoughts do include a fuel tank back of the firewall.
I'd be wanting a bit more run time than the small Cox tank allows.
Well if this is being voted on, it appears that the Throttle Sleeve is the best loved.
Still, I'd like to compare it with the Throttle Conversion unit that fits in back of the engine.
I have a "Sure Start" engine that it can fit to.
Rob, I'm glad that you posted.
I want to tell you how much I appreciate your web site.
I've received a lot of good information aimed at helping the scratch builder.
Thank you.
Please see PM
Scratch...
Feb 15, 2020, 10:50 AM
A man with a plan
Balsaworkbench's Avatar
Thanks, I appreciate it. I hope the guys who want to build old fashioned planes can get the info they need, and see that it isn't really all that difficult. Mostly I think anybody who is interested needs to just get started.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scratch99
Does that efficiency also work for the other engines that Cox produced with the same slotted ports?
I read that the Texaco also had different fuel metering.

The slotted exhaust port is a different issue. The size and number of transfer ports on the inside of the cylinder is the main factor that determines burn rate and power level, as far as I know. I've never heard of the Texaco having a different venturi, but it would make sense.

I recently got a good deal on a couple of brand new ones that are actually Texaco Jr engines, the only difference being a smaller fuel tank. I bought the full size tank separately, the same one found on the Black Widow engine. I can consistently get about five minutes.
Feb 15, 2020, 02:35 PM
Registered User
I've never had a throttle sleeve, but I had about four or five years of experience with the needle. You use it with only with a built-in tank reedy, so there is no fuel tank in the way of the rod that operates it. On my Schoolmaster I had a nice straight shot from the servo to the back of the engine, nothing in the way, the geometry worked well. Battery pack fit easily under the rod. Seemed like a good option at the time. I don't think any of them give you a true idle, so you can't use them for touch and goes. Gave a good cruising speed and transitions were fine.

I sometimes used a 7x4 prop, not with a Texaco head, which I think was not out yet, but with a couple of extra head gaskets. The idea was to reduce compression, which the Texaco head does also. The reduced compression/larger prop idea was pioneered by 1/2A Texaco competitors; Cox came up with the head later. I suppose the extra cooling is good too, but I never had a problem with over-heating.


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