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Old Mar 22, 2005, 02:40 PM
Inverted_Fly is offline
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brushless nutjob
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not all planes can just bank and yank like you describe. A great deal of modern 3ders have a hard time doing that, especially the Tensor.


flat turns are easy and fun. vertical pinwheels however, are difficult and fun.
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Old Mar 22, 2005, 07:56 PM
sbmon is offline
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So we have coordinated turns, banked turns, and flat turns. I am still a little confused, I understand that a banked turn is not always a coordinated turn but can be, but a flat turn is never a coordinated turn (is this correct)? Sorry for the knit picking on the terminology I would just like to get a handle on the differences among these turns.
thank you
shawn
Old Mar 22, 2005, 11:17 PM
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Burnin' holes in the sky!
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Like Inverted Fly said, the best turning technique depends on the airplane. A standard coordinated turn is where the plane is banked to one side and rudder in the same direction is applied to keep the plane tracking through a circle. This is how a "competition turn" is done. A "yank and bank" turn is basically initiated by banking the plane so much that yaw doesn't matter, then pulling up on the stick. The guys that do this are the ones you usually end up ducking for at the field . Finally, a flat turn is where rudder is moved to one side and aileron/elevator are used to keep it straight and level.

Dan
Old Mar 23, 2005, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyPyro
Like Inverted Fly said, the best turning technique depends on the airplane. A standard coordinated turn is where the plane is banked to one side and rudder in the same direction is applied to keep the plane tracking through a circle. This is how a "competition turn" is done. A "yank and bank" turn is basically initiated by banking the plane so much that yaw doesn't matter, then pulling up on the stick. The guys that do this are the ones you usually end up ducking for at the field . Finally, a flat turn is where rudder is moved to one side and aileron/elevator are used to keep it straight and level.

Dan

So, would a typical foamy need elevator and aileron to execute a flat turn?



bob
Old Mar 23, 2005, 02:20 AM
ryanl2006 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelgtr
So, would a typical foamy need elevator and aileron to execute a flat turn?



bob

Most will. Usually when rudder is applied the nose will drop and one wingtip will drop but it depends on the plane. Some planes can do it with just rudder, but most require aileron and elevator to remain flat.
Old Mar 23, 2005, 02:24 AM
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Your theoretical "perfect foamy" wouldn't need elevator or aileron to pull off a flat turn. However, even the best designs have some degree of coupling. Aileron is just used to keep the wingtip on the inside of the turn from dropping (or climbing if there is forward sweep/anhedral). Elevator is then used to keep the plane from climbing or diving.

Dan
Old Mar 23, 2005, 07:19 AM
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the new Shockflyers - F3A and YAK- balanced for nice controllable maneuvering -NOT really tailheavy - do instant flat turns with rudder only - no fiddling with other axis.
The coupling is so minimal as to ignore in all but extended max deflection turns .
There are no typical foamies - I know of .
but a good typical 3D type that is of latest generation -all do instant , flat turns -even a rank beginner can do em.
These planes are all flat -flat wing ,flat stab- no dihedral but the lateral area is well balanced and the common engine /wing/stab force setup is pretty darn nuetral


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