Thread Tools
Dec 04, 2019, 05:29 AM
Registered User
P.S. Smaller models, all else being equal, usually do better with somewhat thinner airfoils. So that might be an appropriate mod for,a shrunk Mimi. Also, I wonder if some of the "stabilized" receivers may help if they don't object too much to vertical climbs. I seem to recall that the UMX Radian had a very effective one that allowed it to cope with a surprising amount of gusty wind. That receiver is very small and has two built in linear servos. I don't know about the range, though. Maybe you could learn to fly with the UMX Radian and then use the gear in a rocket glider.

Flying students have told me that simulators are helpful. One thing's for sure: the crashes are cheaper. I recommend CRRCsim. It's free, except you may have to buy a suitable cable so your transmitter can talk with your computer. Don't bother trying to use it with the keyboard alone.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Dec 04, 2019, 07:21 AM
The Mr. Rogers of RC soaring
rdwoebke's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lincoln
Whip It (yuck!).
If a person is self teaching I think the Whipit could be the best way to go. I used the Whipit when teaching my daughter using a modified self teaching program. I can go into detail if the OP is interested.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lincoln
That receiver is very small and has two built in linear servos. I don't know about the range, though.
Some friends of mine did some testing and with a full range transmitter those all in one Spectrum receiver units have at least 1,000 feet of range. That is probably sufficient for models of that size.

Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons
Dec 04, 2019, 07:17 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwoebke
If a person is self teaching I think the Whipit could be the best way to go. I used the Whipit when teaching my daughter using a modified self teaching program. I can go into detail if the OP is interested.
That would be appreciated. Either in this thread or as a new one. I almost bought a UMX Radian (electric) today, doesn't look like the whipit is available any more.

And, all things considered, if the slightly larger models (> 1m wingspan) can be lofted to 3-400 feet on a lower power motor, that would be fine. Honestly, I'm not even sure about the 3-400' as a ceiling, that was just a number that popped in my head as an appropriate one for a park flyer.

JP
Dec 04, 2019, 09:46 PM
The Mr. Rogers of RC soaring
rdwoebke's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkd.teacher
That would be appreciated. Either in this thread or as a new one. I almost bought a UMX Radian (electric) today, doesn't look like the whipit is available any more.
JP,

I think if you look around you will be able to find some places that still have the Whipit

The below process is only if you insist upon self training. I would suggest finding somebody to help teach you.

First step is to make sure the radio is programmed properly. When looking at the glider from behind if you move the right hand stick right the rudder moves right. Left the opposite direction. When looking at the glider from behind if you pull back on the right hand stick the elevator raises up. If you push forward on the right hand stick the elevator goes down. This translates to if you were sitting in the glider if you push forward on the stick the nose would lower and pull back on the stick the nose would raise.

For your first sessions you are going to be doing very gentle flights. If you can find a place with tall grass/weeds/hay that is ideal. If not try to find some grass of some sort. You want to find a time of the day where the wind is as nonexistent as possible. Early in the morning is good. You will hold the plane by the fuselage with your hand kind of shaped like a U. Imagine if you were throwing a dart at a dart board. And you will kind of gently throw the plane very level and away from you. Again like you are throwing a dart not like you are throwing a baseball or football. Your objective is to gently throw the glider and have it fly away from you and you will give control inputs to keep the plane flying level and flying directly away from you. You will practice this over and over. This is how you will train yourself how control inputs effect the plane.

After you have mastered the simple dart throw and you have done a great job of just keeping the model flying directly away from you and you do a good job of keeping it flying straight you can start to add more power to your "dart" throws. When you do this the model instead of just flying straight away from you will climb up at an angle and your job will be to learn to push forward on the stick before the model stalls and transition the model into a glide. That can be tricky for a new learner. Your objective will be to add more power to the "dart" throw until it is climbing to about 15 feet and you are doing a good job of letting it climb and then pushing the nose over and flying straight away.

After you master this now with your throw to 15 feet after you level the plane out you can start to add a gentle left or right turn. You will do the dart throw, level the plane off before it stalls, and then after leveling it off give a bit of left or right and start a very gentle turn. you will keep feeding in this gentle turn while monitoring the pitch of the plane with the elevator until the model is a few feet off the ground when you will level the plane off and land it. Repeat this process eventually feeding in more left or right until you can do a strong "dart" throw, level the plane off, and then make a big turn and land the plane back near your feet.

Once you have mastered the above you are ready to start doing wing launches. You hold the wing tip between your fingers and thumb in a kind of U shape and you do a gentle kind of "flick" where you are almost doing an underarm softball toss. If you have done a good job of learning how to push the nose forward before the plane stalls when doing the strong "dart" throw you should be able to push the nose over before the model stalls and get it leveled out and then once again make a big circle around you and land it near your feet. This is probably where you will start to need to learn to reverse the turn control when the plane is coming toward you. The plane will react as if you are sitting in the plane and if the plane is flying towards you if you push right on the stick the plane will go to your left (its right). You need to train your brain to know that is what it is going to do. There are different strategies for this but one that some people do is when the plane is flying towards you to level the plane out you push the stick towards the wing you want to raise.

After you get good at this you can add more and more power to the throw. Eventually you should be able to get to the point where you can do that softball type throw while holding onto the whippets wing tip and have a flight that lasts about 35-40 seconds. When you have mastered this and are bringing it back to you then you might be ready to start trying rocket engines. I think an A10-0 would lob it up in the air about 150 or so feet. A B6-0 should take it up maybe 300-400 feet or so.


Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons
Dec 06, 2019, 11:19 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Question - if the model only uses 2 servos, are they both controlled by one stick on the transmitter?
Dec 06, 2019, 11:54 AM
The Mr. Rogers of RC soaring
rdwoebke's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkd.teacher
Question - if the model only uses 2 servos, are they both controlled by one stick on the transmitter?
That is typically how most of us do it. If the model is ruder/elevator only we have both on the right stick. This is because when the model has high dihedral/polyhedral that giving rudder causes the plane to bank and yaw. It is an aerodynamic effect caused by the high dihedral.


Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons
Dec 06, 2019, 11:59 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwoebke
That is typically how most of us do it. If the model is ruder/elevator only we have both on the right stick. This is because when the model has high dihedral/polyhedral that giving rudder causes the plane to bank and yaw. It is an aerodynamic effect caused by the high dihedral.


Ryan
For $15, is this worth getting?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Spektrum-DX...cAAOSwce1d4Voi

Jp
Dec 06, 2019, 12:41 PM
The Mr. Rogers of RC soaring
rdwoebke's Avatar
Personally I am not a huge fan of simulators. They haven't really done anything for me. But you can get the CRRCSIM for free and if your radio has a headphone jack trainer port you can use that for a dollar or maybe free if you already have a cable.

Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion Converting a Mimi to rocket boost tkd.teacher Sailplane Talk 0 Dec 02, 2019 11:06 AM
Discussion Estes Sweet Vee R/C Rocket Boosted Glider kit George Gassaway Rocketry 1 Nov 07, 2019 03:37 PM
Discussion Stable 5v boost converter help karl5489 Batteries and Chargers 6 Aug 27, 2017 08:43 PM
Discussion Rocket Boost Gliders Oxotnik VTOLs 6 Oct 04, 2016 12:20 PM