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Nov 20, 2019, 06:05 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
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OK, this is as close to green as I'm willing to go, the paint color is called Satin Sea Glass.
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Nov 25, 2019, 06:21 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
I received the mahogany veneer I ordered for the front and middle cockpits. The instructions call for staining them, but I think the veneer will look nicer.
Nov 27, 2019, 06:22 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
.OK, after studying the issue of the rudder access door being under the stern section of the boat and attached with screws and with the possibility of water being able to get in through it, I have found a probable solution. If I remove three supports in the stern section behind the rear cockpit, I can mount the rudder servo and be able to access the rudder from the top and eliminate the access door from the bottom of the boat. The modification will be where the blue tape is located. I will have to make the access door for the top of the stern, but shouldn't be a big deal (famous last words) hahahahaha.
Nov 28, 2019, 05:58 AM
Me and a guy with a mustache
babblefish's Avatar
I bought a Typhoon kit about three decades ago(Yikes!) but have been afraid to build it because I don't have much experience with planking. The quality of the fittings looked a little questionable too.

I'll be watching your build to maybe gain some motivation and/or confidence to start mine.
Nov 28, 2019, 08:14 AM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
Hey babble, one thing about Dumas kits, they are very forgiving when it comes to planking. I have found the best advice to planking is just do it. I have received planked hulls of various kits that were started with good intentions and just never finished. The planking was so bad, I had to rip it all off and start over. One thing about wood, it's a lot easier to fix it.

The most important thing to remember when planking a hull, if the keel and the frame is not straight, it will not be straight when it's finished. Unfortunately, you bought one of the hardest Dumas kits to build, so stay tuned.
Nov 29, 2019, 10:11 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtdoramike
.OK, after studying the issue of the rudder access door being under the stern section of the boat and attached with screws and with the possibility of water being able to get in through it, I have found a probable solution. If I remove three supports in the stern section behind the rear cockpit, I can mount the rudder servo and be able to access the rudder from the top and eliminate the access door from the bottom of the boat. The modification will be where the blue tape is located. I will have to make the access door for the top of the stern, but shouldn't be a big deal (famous last words) hahahahaha.

Hi Mike,
I have already four Dumas Chris craft boats and I have already the Typhoon kit for my next build. You Mentioned the possibility of water entering the boat throe the rudder access door. All of my four Dumas boats take on water and I image that it will be no different with this Typhoon Boat. Since you mentioned that problem I'm really interested to see hoe you plan to solve this problem.

Out of my four boats the Cobra is the worst when it comes to taking on water. If you look at the boat i guess it is obvious why. The 1949 Chris Craft Racing Runabout has the same problem just a bit less. The Triple cockpit which is even a bit taller same problem. I made all hatches pretty tight but still there is constant a lot of water that enters. I separated all compartments so that water that comes in to the cockpit should remain there. Using foam that i sprayed below floors and in the sides of the cabins ensures that cockpits are water tight. So if i find water in the rear section it enters throe the gaps in that hatch.
If you look at the picture showing the open rudder hatch you see behind the Rudder arm how i filled hallow spaces with foam. Between Ruder and rear wall is a room where water always collected and it was hard to remove any water from this tight spot.

In the past I always thought that water which makes it in to the open cockpits finds a way to the inside of the boat. In my last build i put a lot of effort in to sealing the Cockpits. In my triple cockpit i can fill up the cockpits with water and it remains there. So for the Typhoon boat i have plans to make a Metal frame for the access hatches. The metal frame will have a O Ring seal. Most probably i will end up having a separate wood hatch for the looks and below a sealed metal Lid that is screwed on.

Looking at the picture showing the green bottom i point with the pencil on a line that appeared after the boat was filled several times with water. On that picture it might be hard to see, but where the Mahogany planks meet a fine line is visible. I guess the water made it somehow to the planking and the wood swelled different then the glue.
Last edited by Rigibahn; Nov 29, 2019 at 10:31 AM.
Nov 29, 2019, 11:14 AM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
WOW, I have built a number of Dumas boats and have not had any issues with any of them taking on water. But, I have heard of this issue when you over power Run abouts and run them open throttle rather than scale speeds. Mahogany run abouts should never run with the stem of the boat popping out of the water, forcing the stern downwards, also when you turn a run about, you do gentle turns or wide turns especially at higher speeds because you can swamp them quite easily. They are not meant for speed.
Nov 30, 2019, 09:22 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtdoramike
WOW, I have built a number of Dumas boats and have not had any issues with any of them taking on water. But, I have heard of this issue when you over power Run abouts and run them open throttle rather than scale speeds. Mahogany run abouts should never run with the stem of the boat popping out of the water, forcing the stern downwards, also when you turn a run about, you do gentle turns or wide turns especially at higher speeds because you can swamp them quite easily. They are not meant for speed.
Sorry Mike, the Stem or Keel of a real Mahogany runabout will pop out of the water when running in full speed. (see pictures below) I'm 65 still like to have fun with a speedy boat, I'm not dead jet.
Scale Speeds what a funky expression. On a scaled down boat nothing is to scale anymore for sure not the waves. With that said i know why Dumas boats taking on water during a god run.

It's all a matter of taste and nobody is just right or wrong.
PJ
Dec 01, 2019, 08:57 AM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
yes, but model Run Abouts should not, they are easily swamped and should be run at scale speeds. But that's not to say you can't run them full speed, as long as you are willing to swim out to retrieve it or worse yet sink it. But it will take on water if not careful, unlike other R/C boats.
Dec 01, 2019, 06:05 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
I bit the bullet and cut out the section for the rudder servo and rudder access compartment. The trick will be building a cover for the access compartment and getting it to match the curve of the top.
Dec 02, 2019, 08:40 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtdoramike
yes, but model Run Abouts should not, they are easily swamped and should be run at scale speeds. But that's not to say you can't run them full speed, as long as you are willing to swim out to retrieve it or worse yet sink it. But it will take on water if not careful, unlike other R/C boats.
Mike: Wood boats sinking really. There is just one kind of wood that does not float, it is that green colored Lignum vitae. Most Model boat builders ad Foam inside of the boat, just to be sure. My self i prefer to fill some of the hallow compartments with Spray Foam. This way my boats will never sink but the better part of it is that Water will never enter those empty spaces like the inaccessible Bow of a Dumas runabout.
Dec 03, 2019, 08:32 AM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
Ok, I attempted to offer a second build thread on the boat to give a slightly different perspective of the build. But as usual, on this site there is always know it all's who hi-jack a thread that really have no constructive input other than to try and pick an argument. Your loss, my gain I can spned more time building and less time posting.
Dec 03, 2019, 01:35 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
It's a shame to let one person ruin it for everyone, so I will be periodically opening this thread to add my progress on this build. So stay tuned for future updates.
Dec 05, 2019, 06:56 PM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
I had to make a new piece of plywood to replace the K7 and K6 pieces which were to go under the stern section, the K6 piece was supposed to be removable to gain access to the rudder arm. But since I'm making the access through the top, I decided to make this piece a solid piece of wood rather than two pieces. The main issue to me was making sure I had enough clearance between the rudder and the prop, which doesn't appear to be an issue.
Dec 06, 2019, 11:40 AM
Mt. Dora, Florida
mtdoramike's Avatar
Thread OP
There seems to be plenty of clearance between the prop and the rudder and also for the motor. I ordered a speed 600 motor for it, which should push it along quite well without overpowering it.


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