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Oct 11, 2019, 03:23 PM
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Not A Good Week


It has been a rough week for me. It started out good with getting a new plane, an ARF Typhoon, which I plan on building later but the week turned sour when the ground smited my old hot rod PT 40 Trainer after a mid-air. That doesn't count as a crash on my part does it? ...and then today on my second flight on my old hot rod Sweep Hawk , Irvine 40 on a pipe, it started acting funny in the air. I thought it was radio interference on my old 72 MHz. When I got it down and took the wing off the problem was obvious. Fuel and electronics don't mix. The insides were soaked from a leaking tank. ...and I just knew this wasn't ever going to happen to me even though the plane was more than 15 years old.

So here I sit, it's raining outside and the weather isn't supposed to get much better. I did save the engine and most of the servos on the trainer and the other one has it's fuselage full of cat litter. Both my oldest planes are pretty much gone. Oh well I still have 6 newer ones for next week maybe. Wish me luck.
Last edited by JimboPilotFL; Oct 11, 2019 at 04:09 PM.
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Oct 11, 2019, 05:34 PM
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earlwb's Avatar
We all have bad days. My worst was going to the flying field with five airplanes. Yes you guessed it. I crashed them all. I have all worn out numerous planes over the years too. The poor things do wear out eventually.
Oct 11, 2019, 06:21 PM
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burlesontom's Avatar
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The poor things do wear out eventually.
Yes they do. My first RC model build and trainer that I really learned to fly on was a Little Stick from Midwest. After a few months including a wing failure ( I missed that part about glassing the center section) my plane was a flying tribute to Devcon epoxy. So I built a second one. It fared much better.

Its funny you mention fuel tank leaks. My last two issues have been with leaking fuel tanks. I put Oilsorb in both planes and read that Calcium Carbonate will also pull oil out of wood. What is calcium carbonate? Plain old chalk. I use sidewalk chalk in my insurance adjuster job to mark hail damage on roofs so I can photo it. So I took some of my chalk and used a rasp to collect a big pile of it and put that on the wood after dumping out the oilsorb granules. It seemed like it sucked it right out but sort of colored the wood. I blew it out with an air hose and everything was fine after that. No fuel in my electronics thankfully.
Oct 11, 2019, 06:26 PM
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I know there is a lesson or two to be learned here but I am not going to preach, even to myself.

I did find the kitty litter solution to fuel soaked wood here on RCG.
Oct 11, 2019, 07:39 PM
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earlwb's Avatar
yup I filled up a fuselage with fuel when the fuel tank had split the neck on me one day. I had started to wonder why it was taking so long to refuel when fuel started coming out of the fuselage.
Last edited by earlwb; Oct 12, 2019 at 06:38 AM. Reason: typo
Oct 12, 2019, 02:18 AM
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Ouch
Only good thing about crashes is it makes room in the hangar.
Oct 12, 2019, 05:34 AM
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AndyOne's Avatar
I used talcum powder to get the diesel smoke-fuel that had leaked inside a 60cc aerobat. Over-wintered with it in there then vacuumed it out, job done!
It left a strange smell though.

A.
Oct 12, 2019, 08:55 AM
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I know the feeling well. Had just bought a new controller, receiver and servos and installed them in a plane I had used only a few times. On the second flight in the middle of the flight I suddenly lost full control of the plane. I watched as my plane did loops until it's final loop when it plowed into the ground. There was nothing left of the plane.
The clouds and rain will subside and the sun will appear and you will be back out flying again. The crash only a memory!
Oct 12, 2019, 12:07 PM
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SeismicCWave's Avatar
Any mechanical (electrical devices also) devices require periodic maintenance. Full scale aircrafts have a mandatory maintenance schedule. Our family automobiles have a maintenance schedule. I am surprised that we don't have a maintenance schedule for our RC flying vehicles. I am guilty as much as every one else. We treat our airplanes and helicopters like toys. To a degree that are but they can be fairly large and dangerous also.

I do spend a little time doing maintenance on my planes both before the weekend flying sessions and most importantly after the flying sessions. At least I can minimize and prevent some issues but definitely not all the issues. My workshop is so full some times I don't mind a crash. However I don't like minor crashes where I still have to bring the airframe home and hang it up. If I crash lets make it spectacular.

Mid air collision is a matter of luck. No much we can do about it. On the other hand sometimes a mid air can be spectacular.
Oct 13, 2019, 08:10 AM
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I still can't figure out how when only 2 planes are in the air and trying to stay away from each other, a mid-air can occur. But it does. A while back I lost a nice flying Tower Hobbies "Kaos 40" to a spectacular mid-air. It seems that when flying combat it's always hard to connect with the other planes. But, when you have a nice plane up there and are trying to stay away it just happens. Back when I flew full size aircraft I can remember a few times when I had a direct crisscross with another aircraft with all that open sky up there. Thank goodness for the rules of altitude separation when flying North or East and South or West. Anyhow, wait for a nice sunny day and go have fun!
Oct 14, 2019, 10:22 AM
Registered User
Midairs have always been classified as "no fault".

I like a product called "K2R" for drying fuel out of a fuse. You can get it (usually) from an ACE hardware store.

I've watched fuel run out of my fuse many times over the years. To help things, I've always painted the inside of the tank compartment and a good bit of the radio compartment with epoxy.

I've never crashed 5 planes in one day.


carl
Oct 14, 2019, 06:12 PM
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earlwb's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlgrover
Midairs have always been classified as "no fault".

I like a product called "K2R" for drying fuel out of a fuse. You can get it (usually) from an ACE hardware store.

I've watched fuel run out of my fuse many times over the years. To help things, I've always painted the inside of the tank compartment and a good bit of the radio compartment with epoxy.

I've never crashed 5 planes in one day.


carl
Very competitive Quickie 500 racing at the time. All the planes had to do was lightly touch each other and the one on the bottom would literally explode. Very impressive and a good crowd pleaser too. Interestingly the one on top usually had nothing happen to it. That was back when I was quite a bit more young in age. I could build two or three Q500's in a couple of days. I usually had about three Q500 planes in various stages of construction at that time too. Superglue was fairly new at the time and it was a godsend way back then.
Last edited by earlwb; Oct 14, 2019 at 08:08 PM. Reason: add more info
Oct 15, 2019, 11:00 AM
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Yes. Quickies. I 've seen lots of them crash/explode/etc. Our club used to race them years ago. Even hosted the National championships once. I watched the engine, firewall, and tank exit the fuse once as the plane was going around a turn.

carl
Oct 15, 2019, 11:19 AM
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earlwb's Avatar
yeah there was lots of excitement and adrenaline flowing when you had the final heats and the planes were all evenly matched. Four planes going neck to neck down the straights and in the turns right up close to each other. Everyone trying to squeeze their plane into that optimum groove in the air around the course. That was way back when everyone had to use K&B .40 engines at the time. So most of the time everyone was evenly matched, leaving it up to pilot skill for the rest. I still have a Spickler Q500 kit around here someplace too. But at the time I was scratch building the Q500 planes using a Spickler kit as a template. I never got to win first place, but i came in second and third a few times.
Last edited by earlwb; Oct 15, 2019 at 11:23 AM. Reason: typo
Oct 16, 2019, 08:39 AM
Registered User
Ah, now there's some great memories...some of the most fun I've ever had when flying!!! As I remember getting the fastest time meant flying low and turning as tight as possible around the pylons. Also, flying as straight a line as possible between the pylons was the key. One day between heats I was watching another group of four flying the course and noticed a lot of guys were flying real wide between the pylons like a circular pattern which adds to your elapsed time. I learned something from that...fly tight and straight...got me a lot of wins. I wish I could still fly like that! The good old days.


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