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Dec 13, 2019, 03:51 PM
Registered User
Unfortunately, the 400ft limit is still in place and the AMA doesn't have the authority to grant a waiver. That authority would need to be granted by the FAA to the AMA.

Note that altitude limits are in place in controlled areas. Uncontrolled areas (where you don't need LAANC approval) are still bound by the existing restrictions.

Really not much has changed. Not sure where the win is here.
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Dec 13, 2019, 04:39 PM
Registered User
aeronaut999's Avatar
Also consider:

Quote:
Originally Posted by RStrowe
Although printed in the latest MA, this was written by a Patrick Sherman, who is associated with Advanced Flight Technologies. Not AMA, although AMA should accept some responsibility since they reprinted it without proper vetting.

RStrowe
Dec 13, 2019, 04:50 PM
Registered User
I read a little bit from that Welcome to the Big Leagues page. The statement that, in some areas, the FAA regulates the airspace all the way to the ground caught my eye. I would like to see enforcement to the letter of the law. After baseball players, Frisbee flyers, and people who jump in their back yard start to fill up the nation's jails, maybe we'd see a revision to more reasonable rules. ;-)
Dec 13, 2019, 05:33 PM
Registered User
aeronaut999's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Suter
http://www.modelaviation.com/welcome-big-leagues

Isn't this in contrary to the law that has a 400 foot ceiling limitaion? So this AMA email says that I can fly using See and Avoid in Class G airspace which normally goes up to but not including 700' or 1,200' and in some cases up to 14,500'?

Curtis
Quote:
Originally Posted by aeronaut999
The article published in the Nov 2019 issue of "Model Aviation" said -- "In addition, you are now able to fly in any and all Class G airspace, which covers the majority of the surface area of the US."

It may be that they only meant their statement to encompass the geographical (horizontal) extent of where you can fly in class G, not the vertical extent. If so, that's some awfully poor writing.

Steve


In all fairness, the article does contain the sentences
Quote:
"LAANC makes most of that airspace available in real time via an app on a pilot’s smartphone. The surface-controlled airspace surrounding nearly 600 airports nationwide has been divided into 1-squaremile blocks. Each block is assigned a number that corresponds with the maximum altitude that unmanned aircraft are allowed to fly.

The highest number is 400 feet—the ceiling for drone operations in most instances."
Those last 8 words might have been meant to be inclusive of Class G airspace as well as airspace covered by the LAANC grid. Still, not great writing / editing in my opinion.

At the very least, the article seems to be thoroughly imbued / permeated with the attitude that an increase in the geographical (horizontal) extent of the area of Class G airspace that is open to sUAS flying is a wonderful thing, while the imposition of a 400' cap (maximum) in all airspace including Class G airspace has so little adverse effect that it is barely worth mentioning.
Last edited by aeronaut999; Dec 13, 2019 at 06:39 PM.
Dec 14, 2019, 12:48 PM
SKSS Delaware AMA 1010092
Quote:
Q: I have seen communications about an upcoming test. What is this?

A: Soon, all recreational flyers will have to pass the recreational knowledge and safety test. Completion of the test is one of the eight statutory requirements to operate under section 349, the exception for limited recreational operations of unmanned aircraft.
That's from the AMA Government Relations Blog. https://amablog.modelaircraft.org/am...y-test-update/

So if item 7 is the law then so is item 6. Hopefully there will be a waiver process but I don't know it flying my gliders would be worth the extra hassle and I'm not sure how hard I want to study to pass a test to fly anything at all.

6. In Class G airspace, the aircraft is flown from the surface to not more than 400 feet above ground level and complies with all airspace restrictions and prohibitions.
7. The operator has passed an aeronautical knowledge and safety test and maintains proof of test passage to be made available to the Administrator or a designee of the Administrator or law enforcement upon request.
Dec 14, 2019, 01:55 PM
Dark Side of the Red Merle
Curtis Suter's Avatar
Don't sweat the Recreational test.
It'll be a multiple guess test and the study guides that will pop up will basically instill you with the answers, err, I mean knowledge.
At least that's my experience with full scale FAA written tests.
Curtis
Dec 14, 2019, 03:37 PM
Registered User
Gratter's Avatar
[QUOTE=Curtis Suter;43374043]Don't sweat the Recreational test.
It'll be a multiple guess test and the study guides that will pop up will basically instill you with the answers, err, I mean knowledge.
At least that's my experience with full scale FAA written tests.
Curtis[/QUOTE

A photography client of mine was thinking of getting into drone photography a while back. He took the online test at the time and said if you missed a question they would ask it again in a slightly different way till you got it correct. So thinking Curtis is onto something.
Dec 14, 2019, 04:51 PM
Registered User
Bottom line the FAA wants its money. They don’t want anyone to fail. No pass, no money.
Dec 14, 2019, 06:21 PM
Team Futaba
Silent-AV8R's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinowace
Bottom line the FAA wants its money. They don’t want anyone to fail. No pass, no money.
Ummm..... What money are you talking about? $5 for 3 years registration? That comes to 0.01% of the FAA budget for 3 years.

Testing? FAA makes zero dollars from the test.

So what money do you mean?
Dec 14, 2019, 06:43 PM
Goog-a-moog-a
planefun's Avatar

Airmap


Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Suter
http://www.modelaviation.com/welcome-big-leagues

Isn't this in contrary to the law that has a 400 foot ceiling limitaion? So this AMA email says that I can fly using See and Avoid in Class G airspace which normally goes up to but not including 700' or 1,200' and in some cases up to 14,500'?

Curtis
Has anyone tried using the airmap app?
Just for a test I registered and tried to submit a flight plan for the AMA site I fly at located in Delaware.
The sight has been there for a very long time without any issues from anyone...

When I went to submit the flight plan for Sunday, it returned a warning that I was about to submit a plan that would violate the 400 foot ceiling.

So far it looks like there is no win here for sailplane users. So sad....maybe I can trade my sailplane for a bowling ball.

Tony G
Dec 14, 2019, 08:38 PM
Registered User
aeronaut999's Avatar
The AMA apparently still thinks some arrangement will be worked out allowing operations above 400' in Class G. See https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...ble-in-Class-G .

Steve
Dec 16, 2019, 04:41 PM
Duane, LSF IV
Wazmo's Avatar
FAA email today:

Quote:
Calling All Pilots – Manned and Unmanned

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on January 13, 2020, will launch improvements to the way it tests all applicants for an FAA airman certificate for all certificated pilots (including drone pilots).

One of the most important changes is the requirement that all applicants obtain an FAA Tracking Number (FTN) by creating an Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application (IACRA) profile prior to registering for a knowledge test.

The FTN allows the applicant and any certifying officer the ability to pull up airman information in a consistent format, leaving little room for errors associated with an applicant’s name. Previously, name inconsistencies could lead to returned files and lengthy delays in the certification process.
IACRA is the web-based certification/rating application that guides the user through the FAA's airman application process.

The FAA will host four webinars beginning next week to explain the new testing system, including the FTN requirement. Please select one of the dates below to register for a Webinar.

Thursday, December 19, 2019 – 10:00 a.m. EST
Thursday, December 19, 2019 – 3:00 p.m. EST
Wednesday, January 8, 2020 – 10:00 a.m. EST
Wednesday, January 8, 2020 – 3:00 p.m. EST

For more information about the new testing system, please visit Airman Certificate Testing Service (ACTS).
I'm not including the janky-looking links, though I'm guessing they'll end up being legit.
Dec 16, 2019, 05:07 PM
The King Moonracer of balsa.
Windependence's Avatar
That was very thoughtful of them to schedule all of the webinars during the work day. I can't speak for everyone here but my employer will probably not let me watch this on company time. And using PTO is not a real appealing option either. I hope they make a recorded version available for folks like me.

Wayne
Dec 16, 2019, 05:20 PM
Team Futaba
Silent-AV8R's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wazmo
FAA email today:



I'm not including the janky-looking links, though I'm guessing they'll end up being legit.
But none of this applies to Recreational pilots. Only pilots issued certificates in accordance with Part 61 or Part 107. I've had a FTN associated with my PPL for years.


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