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Sep 24, 2019, 09:16 PM
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AEOTech's Avatar
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New Product

New Training Balsawood Airplane---T12 Eyas from Dancing Wings Hobby


Hi, guys

Dancing wings hobby's new training balsawood airplane is coming soon, welcome your any suggestion about this model.

Specification:
Wingspan:1200mm
Length:870mm
Wing Load:34g(g/sq.dm)
Flying Weight:900g
Motor:2212KV 1400 1912-2216
Prop: APC SF9047 9-10inch
Battery:3S 2200MAH 3S 1300-2800
Servo:9G
ESC: DS 30A 20-30A
Receiver:4CH

Feature:
1200mm High Wing Training Airplane
There are so many similar models, how dare to show here if no special features!
A good training airplane is to let the novice easily take-off and easily landing.

1. The fuselage body is made of 82% balsa wood; The material determines the quality.
2. The take-off weight is only about 900g. It is 20% lighter than similar models. (Recommended configuration).
3. Wing load: 34g (g/sq.dm), lighter weight, lower stall point. And itís more suitable for beginners.
4. Compared with similar training airplane, this airplane has the heaviness of the balsa model and the flexibility.
5. Can work with common power equipments, recommend the motor 1912-2220mm; 15A-30A ESC; 3S 1300mAh-2800mAh battery.
Itís the most suitable training airplane for beginners.
A good training airplane is to let the novice easily take-off and easily landing.
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Sep 25, 2019, 08:35 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Light weight has its advantages, but also its downside, I'd suggest. I'm a Beginner, and have built from a kit a Svenson Prima as a trainer (electrified...) It weighs 1500 gr for a span of 1400 mm, which seem, to me, to be more suitable for learning in average weather conditions at my flying club (Lower Normandy, France...), where absolute calm, windless days are rare. Too light, and the 'plane is buffeted around, especially down close to the ground, and it's more difficult to bring a 'plane back from downwind if there's not enough 'pull' from the power system. I also use a foam Bixler, which weighs around 800 gr; this survives thanks to its robust material and easy, hot-glue, repair options. A similar trainer made from traditional wood and film would, I suggest, render less service to a novice. My Prima is hefty enough to carry a second Rx and a tutor module, to allow flight from either of two Tx's, thus giving 'buddy box' possibilities without the cabled connection, which works well. Too small a 'plane would be limited in this possibility. In short, then, I'd say that that's a fine 'plane, but I'm glad that, as a complete neophyte, I chose a larger model.
Good luck with the sales.
Sep 25, 2019, 10:48 AM
Registered User
jimm1962's Avatar
Personally I think if it is being marketed towards beginners I would beef up the rear of the fuselage. It is going to break very easily.
Oct 16, 2019, 01:58 AM
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AEOTech's Avatar
Thread OP

Thanks


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad3353
Light weight has its advantages, but also its downside, I'd suggest. I'm a Beginner, and have built from a kit a Svenson Prima as a trainer (electrified...) It weighs 1500 gr for a span of 1400 mm, which seem, to me, to be more suitable for learning in average weather conditions at my flying club (Lower Normandy, France...), where absolute calm, windless days are rare. Too light, and the 'plane is buffeted around, especially down close to the ground, and it's more difficult to bring a 'plane back from downwind if there's not enough 'pull' from the power system. I also use a foam Bixler, which weighs around 800 gr; this survives thanks to its robust material and easy, hot-glue, repair options. A similar trainer made from traditional wood and film would, I suggest, render less service to a novice. My Prima is hefty enough to carry a second Rx and a tutor module, to allow flight from either of two Tx's, thus giving 'buddy box' possibilities without the cabled connection, which works well. Too small a 'plane would be limited in this possibility. In short, then, I'd say that that's a fine 'plane, but I'm glad that, as a complete neophyte, I chose a larger model.
Good luck with the sales.
Hi, dear

Thanks for your kind feedback and suggestion, this is training airplane, as you know, it's for beginner, our engineer has made the flying test, this airplane can fly well, certainly, the weather is not high wind. As beginner, we don't suggest them to fly airplane in bad weather, do you think so ?
Oct 16, 2019, 01:59 AM
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AEOTech's Avatar
Thread OP

yes


Quote:
Originally Posted by jimm1962
Personally I think if it is being marketed towards beginners I would beef up the rear of the fuselage. It is going to break very easily.
Yes, this is one of training airplane for beginner.
Oct 19, 2019, 04:17 AM
Registered User
Just some constructive criticism for you.

I'm a club instructor. I teach on electric, glow, and gas. We train in most kinds of weather. Electric foam trainers usually stand down at 10mph, a .40 sized glow trainer converted to electric can got with a bit higher winds. Glow and gas trainers will train up to 18mph. We do this to expose the students to all kinds of flight conditions. Our average wind speed is 10 to 15 mph.

As for the trainer, we prefer a tricycle gear setup. Students seem to take to it faster. Once they are used to takeoffs, they can switch to tail draggers whenever they want after they solo. We also prefer wire landing gear. After a bad landing, you bend it back in shape and go again. If using sheet metal gear, you rip out the gear mount and you're done for the day and have repaires. We tried using nylon gear bolts, but it's a 50/50 chance you'll do some damage and still be done for the day. The airframe looks weak behind the wing. I'd beef that up some more. Personally, I think a slab of light ply with lightening holes cut in it would be much stronger and faster to assemble.

I like the overall size of the plane, it makes the power system more affordable to beginners. I also like the dual aileron servos, that's just a personal preference on my part.

I've been training for 25 years. I currently have 9 students and one soloed just last week. Being retired, I can take on that type of load, I enjoy training newbies. We get donated .40 sized glow trainers pretty often. I strip the covering off, fix any broken parts, convert some of them to electric, recover and good to go. Durability is more important for trainers than weight (to a point). A converted .40 size wood electric is normally a 40 to 60 amp esc with a G15 to G32 motor form value hobby. On a 3300ma 3 cell lipo battery we get around a 5 minute average flight time. It's the sacrifice we make for durability which is more important. Students are real hard on trainers and landing practice is where most of the damage happens. We don't use safe technology or flight stabilizers. Students have to learn to read the plane to develop their eye hand coordination and reaction time. They can't do that if the flight stabilizer is doing it for them. We make them take it out and use a standard receiver. They tell us it's like starting all over again. After they solo, they can go back to a stablizer if they want.

A trainer your size would be handy to have if it's more durable. It would get the flight times up to comparable to an apprentice 15e, around 6 to 8 minutes depending on the brand of the battery. The apprentice is a pretty good trainer, but being foam, doesn't have a long life span. The club owns 7 of them and at least 4 need to be rebuilt at the end of every year. I have similar issues with the wood frame trainers, but they don't wear out like foam does. The covering on apprentices comes off and sometimes we lose a stab, rudder, or whole fin in flight. All of our apprentices are taped up all over the place to hold them together. After awhile, you just can't keep them trimmed cause they're so beat up. Then we toss them and buy a replacement. Wood doesn't wear out, it just breaks when you crash. We repair and back in the air again.

We tell our newly soloed students to always have a trainer in your hanger. When you crash, you got something to fall back on.

Edwin
Last edited by edwin1; Oct 19, 2019 at 04:34 AM.


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