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Sep 19, 2019, 11:29 PM
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Laserdude's Avatar
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Discussion

ESC settings


I've flown a lot of electric powered planes over the past but I have only used ESCs in their factory settings. I just set up a new plane and the ESC has settings for regular, soft, or very soft starts. What is the purpose of each setting?

Also, I have only used stock timing. How do I determine the proper timing? This one came factory set at 30 deg.
Thanks
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Sep 20, 2019, 12:12 AM
c/f
c/f
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The start setting activates only on initial spin up, generally once turning this feature is satisfied.
Generally speaking the prop weight or rapid throttle advance will hear a chirp or squeal in which the anticipated motor RPM sync to the throttle position is not syncd, so softer starts will use less inrush currents to aid in insureing a smooth ramp up sync. Generally once started it is smart enough to maintain sync.

Timing is also a function of motor ability to stay syncd, Graupner default is 25. Our ESC are actually a 3 phase AC motor controller it need only fire pulses to maintain rotation with poor rpm control. The need for accurate rpm control would have an ESC called sensored in which an additional resolver is part of the motor ESC electronics package, This is common with R/c cars.

Pretty generic explanation but hopefully it works......
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Sep 20, 2019, 09:29 AM
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Laserdude's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c/f
The start setting activates only on initial spin up, generally once turning this feature is satisfied.
Generally speaking the prop weight or rapid throttle advance will hear a chirp or squeal in which the anticipated motor RPM sync to the throttle position is not syncd, so softer starts will use less inrush currents to aid in insureing a smooth ramp up sync. Generally once started it is smart enough to maintain sync.

Timing is also a function of motor ability to stay syncd, Graupner default is 25. Our ESC are actually a 3 phase AC motor controller it need only fire pulses to maintain rotation with poor rpm control. The need for accurate rpm control would have an ESC called sensored in which an additional resolver is part of the motor ESC electronics package, This is common with R/c cars.

Pretty generic explanation but hopefully it works......
Thanks, I appreciate your info but I have a few more questions regarding the timing.

My ESC has settings of 3 deg and 30 deg and several in between.

How do I determine what timing setting to use?

What is the affect of changing the timing?
Sep 20, 2019, 10:05 AM
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vollrathd's Avatar
One prime use for soft starts is when the model is equipped with a folding propeller as used on those sailplanes. You do not want to hit the motor with full power while the prop is still folded. On the larger sailplanes, that could remove the motor from the front of the airplane if one blade unfolds before the other one.
Sep 20, 2019, 10:10 AM
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Laserdude's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vollrathd
One prime use for soft starts is when the model is equipped with a folding propeller as used on those sailplanes. You do not want to hit the motor with full power while the prop is still folded. On the larger sailplanes, that could remove the motor from the front of the airplane if one blade unfolds before the other one.
Thanks
Sep 20, 2019, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserdude
How do I determine what timing setting to use?

What is the affect of changing the timing?
Low timing: good efficiency, less amp draw, less heating, less power, more torque, less rpm.

High timing: more power, more amps, more heating, more rpm, less torque.

Optimum timing depends on the motor parameters and a ton of other factors. You need to decide what you want, and then just do some trial and error testing.
Sep 20, 2019, 09:46 PM
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Laserdude's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkettu
Low timing: good efficiency, less amp draw, less heating, less power, more torque, less rpm.

High timing: more power, more amps, more heating, more rpm, less torque.

Optimum timing depends on the motor parameters and a ton of other factors. You need to decide what you want, and then just do some trial and error testing.
Thanks, so my take on this is if it is getting the job done at lower timing there is no need to turn it up.
Sep 20, 2019, 10:25 PM
If it flies, I can crash it.
rocketsled666's Avatar
The primary purpose of the various start modes is for use in a Heli. Helis have small pinion gears driving large spur gears that spin very large and heavy rotors. A prop is nothing in comparison to the startup torque for a rotor head. Slow start keeps you from stripping gears. I've never used it on an airplane, but I use it on my helis all the time. I have one model, a ParkZone P-51 with a substantial power upgrade. I took the ESC from a wrecked heli for the new motor. Never reprogrammed it. The plane is hand launch. When I fly it, I have to crack the throttle and let the motor spin for 5 seconds before I open the throttle all the way up and give the plane a toss. Unless you're spinning a really big prop, you don't need soft start for an airplane, and it's arguably undesirable. Delaying the start of the motor a few seconds could mean the difference between life or death in a dicey landing situation. Gliding in throttle off, emergency requires you to stab the throttle, motor takes 5 seconds to spin up, crash occurs at 3 seconds.

For timing, check your motor manufacturer, they should have a recommended timing. If not, the typical default is "medium".
Sep 20, 2019, 10:58 PM
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Laserdude's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketsled666
The primary purpose of the various start modes is for use in a Heli. Helis have small pinion gears driving large spur gears that spin very large and heavy rotors. A prop is nothing in comparison to the startup torque for a rotor head. Slow start keeps you from stripping gears. I've never used it on an airplane, but I use it on my helis all the time. I have one model, a ParkZone P-51 with a substantial power upgrade. I took the ESC from a wrecked heli for the new motor. Never reprogrammed it. The plane is hand launch. When I fly it, I have to crack the throttle and let the motor spin for 5 seconds before I open the throttle all the way up and give the plane a toss. Unless you're spinning a really big prop, you don't need soft start for an airplane, and it's arguably undesirable. Delaying the start of the motor a few seconds could mean the difference between life or death in a dicey landing situation. Gliding in throttle off, emergency requires you to stab the throttle, motor takes 5 seconds to spin up, crash occurs at 3 seconds.

For timing, check your motor manufacturer, they should have a recommended timing. If not, the typical default is "medium".
Thanks
Sep 23, 2019, 06:56 PM
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Ron van Sommeren's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketsled666
... Slow start keeps you from stripping gears ...
And it keeps current in bounds during start up.


Vriendelijke groeten Ron
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