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Sep 23, 2019, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuppster
I'm wondering if I should try a synth/castor mix and do some tests. The question is, what am I testing for? Cylinder temps?
Just do some reading up here. Much has been talked about castor and synthetic oil in our glow fuel, and I mean lots. Most glow fuel manufacturers blend their fuels to reflect what their customers want to buy. You will find 17-20 % common with anything from 100 % synthetic to 100 % castor being made. 50/50 synthetic/castor to 80/20 synthetic/castor also being common. ...and folks have their own reasons for using different fuels.

The most common has got to be Omega 15% nitro which is 17% oil with a mix of 70/30 synthetic/castor. You can check that at Morgan fuels.
http://www.morganfuel.com/omega_gallon

If I was going to mix my own fuel I think I would make 10% nitro with 20% oil at a mix of 80/20 synthetic/castor which is what SuperTechinplate oil already is.

...as to what you should look for.... how about everything: starting, idle, transition, power(rpm), heat, wear, long term wear, deposits, etc.
Last edited by JimboPilotFL; Sep 23, 2019 at 11:05 AM.
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Sep 23, 2019, 11:51 AM
Need more speed!
Chuppster's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimboPilotFL
Just do some reading up here. Much has been talked about castor and synthetic oil in our glow fuel, and I mean lots. Most glow fuel manufacturers blend their fuels to reflect what their customers want to buy. You will find 17-20 % common with anything from 100 % synthetic to 100 % castor being made. 50/50 synthetic/castor to 80/20 synthetic/castor also being common. ...and folks have their own reasons for using different fuels.

The most common has got to be Omega 15% nitro which is 17% oil with a mix of 70/30 synthetic/castor. You can check that at Morgan fuels.
http://www.morganfuel.com/omega_gallon

If I was going to mix my own fuel I think I would make 10% nitro with 20% oil at a mix of 80/20 synthetic/castor which is what SuperTechinplate oil already is.

...as to what you should look for.... how about everything: starting, idle, transition, power(rpm), heat, wear, long term wear, deposits, etc.
An important factor to me is the long term wear. I have done quite a bit of reading and it appears there's a lot of opinions out there. It seems that 100% Castor and 100% synth are fine, but castor is safer to use yet it gums up your engine a lot more. I wouldn't mind experimenting with oil concentrations and mixtures but I would want to be able to figure out how to measure engine longevity without doing "destructive testing". For instance, I think it would be nice to run 15% oil mixed 50/50 synth/castor, but if I was to test that how could I tell its ability to lubricate and cool the engine? Is taking note of the cylinder wall temperature enough? VP racing sells fuel with a 14% oil content, does that mean it's safe to use fuel with that little oil?
Sep 23, 2019, 12:05 PM
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SeismicCWave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuppster
An important factor to me is the long term wear. I have done quite a bit of reading and it appears there's a lot of opinions out there. It seems that 100% Castor and 100% synth are fine, but castor is safer to use yet it gums up your engine a lot more. I wouldn't mind experimenting with oil concentrations and mixtures but I would want to be able to figure out how to measure engine longevity without doing "destructive testing". For instance, I think it would be nice to run 15% oil mixed 50/50 synth/castor, but if I was to test that how could I tell its ability to lubricate and cool the engine? Is taking note of the cylinder wall temperature enough? VP racing sells fuel with a 14% oil content, does that mean it's safe to use fuel with that little oil?
Very hard to measure engine longevity without doing destructive testing. You will have to run an engine with a specific mix until you are old and grey. Then there is a big difference between using an engine on a specific mix constantly or sporadically. It all depends on how much you fly and how often you use your engine.

If you use one engine constantly you can run 100% castor and it won't gum up. The only disadvantage will be the exterior of the engine and muffler will get coated with a brown residue. If you use an engine infrequently the castor at any percent will gum up to a degree.

Depending on the engine a 15% oil mix is pretty low for smaller and high performance engines. 15% oil is ok for some sport flying 4 stroke engines and the larger displacement 2 stroke engines. Definitely not as good for 2 stroke .90 and smaller. A bit too much oil never hurts an engine.
Sep 23, 2019, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeismicCWave
Very hard to measure engine longevity without doing destructive testing. You will have to run an engine with a specific mix until you are old and grey. Then there is a big difference between using an engine on a specific mix constantly or sporadically. It all depends on how much you fly and how often you use your engine.

If you use one engine constantly you can run 100% castor and it won't gum up. The only disadvantage will be the exterior of the engine and muffler will get coated with a brown residue. If you use an engine infrequently the castor at any percent will gum up to a degree.

Depending on the engine a 15% oil mix is pretty low for smaller and high performance engines. 15% oil is ok for some sport flying 4 stroke engines and the larger displacement 2 stroke engines. Definitely not as good for 2 stroke .90 and smaller. A bit too much oil never hurts an engine.
For the most part, I fly .90 and larger 4 strokes.
Sep 23, 2019, 12:20 PM
What could possibly go wrong?
Last time I had the LHS mix a batch of glow fuel for me I got 10% nitro, 16% synthetic (Cool Power) and 1% castor. I forget which of the red or green Cool Power oils is higher viscosity and which is nominally intended for 4-stroke, and the other for 2-stroke, but it really doesn't seem to matter much, both offer very similar protection for the engine. I'm not going to attempt to say what's "better" for any application, because as Jimbo says that discussion has run back and forth and back again for years... that type of "debate" never reaches a conclusion and it certainly can't be "won", it just keeps going, I prefer to get out of there before it gets personal. Any reputable brand will be good quality stuff, just select the nitro and oil ratios you want and you're safe.
Castor may be a preference thing really, I can't contribute any technical knowledge but I do know there are plenty of people out there using it, some using castor alone, some like me use just a dash, others maybe 50:50, people have their reasons. It's why I asked Chuppster if he chooses castor out of preference. Remember that for decades it was very widely used, it's before my time but AFAIK it once had the great majority of the market. So it certainly works alright.
Jimbo's post is a good one, all those factors he lists are design parameters for synthetic oils ie they are specifically developed to enhance those numbers. I suggest unless you know a specific reason to use all castor for your application, just use either an off-the-shelf glow fuel with the ratios you want, or if you're mixing your own, make it similar to those fuels. For just about every RC application with IC engines you can use synthetic oils alone and be totally confident in them, and if you want to use some castor then by all means. The oil ratio is more important than whether it's castor, synthetic or a mix.
I guess we'll have to talk about how much oil to use... the accepted standard seems to be 16 to 20% but there are people using much lower oil ratios, I've heard of down to 10% and even as low as 8% (for single-cylinder 4-strokes), but this is for experienced people who know their engines. If you want more info on that I'd recommend asking in the Club Saito thread. For most people most of the time, if you stick to the typical brews as recommended by the manufacturers then you know you're within spec. I believe many model radials use much lower amounts of oil in the fuel but that's a whole different matter. As far as singles and twins, in general just keep it standard. I've got a YS engine so I've been reading some threads about that, and it seems the YS's that keep running well for many years use 20/20 fuel, 20% nitro and 20% oil. Saito seems happy with somewhat less and it's Saito users I've heard running theirs on lower oil ratios. Personally I've been using 16 or 17%, never had a problem and they run great. Others brands, I haven't used.
Which reminds me... Saito manuals do say *not* to use all-castor oil. They don't say not to use any, but no more specific than that. There are 2 manuals available for some Saitos, the Horizon Hobbies version (as the distributor/agent for USA, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere) and a reasonably translated Japanese-English pamphlet included with the engine itself. In my FA-182TD manual it says "Fuel: Recommended good quality fuel (oil 20%) for glow engine use on the market, containing synthetic oil type with nitro content of approx. 5% to 15%. Since the four-stroke engine has high exhaust temperature and carbon is apt to accumulate when castor oil type lubricants are used, avoid using fuel"... yes, it does kind of fizzle out at the point where it says "avoid using fuel". OK, got that? Avoid using fuel. It's too dangerous That and the FA-130TD manual are on my Google drive
The Horizon Hobby manuals for Saito small to medium singles and for twin cylinders have the same wording for their advice on fuel: "1. Fuel. For maximum protection and longevity of Saito engines, Saito recommends a fuel containing 20% oil and 10-15% nitro methane. If this blend is not readily available, the next best selection is a high quality 2-cycle glow fuel, such as Cool Power, K&B, Power Master, etc. Fuels composed entirely of castor oil are not recommended. Use of such fuels will void the warranty."
So again, synthetic oils nominally intended for 2-strokes are fine in 4-strokes and vice versa, and don't use pure castor in 4-strokes, because it can't handle the high temperature of the exhaust valve.

I don't use any 2-strokes so I can't say anything about castor for those, except I've seen inside the head of one that was totally gunked with hard, crusty carbon-looking crud stuck together with burnt oil that was very difficult to remove. I've also known people using castor exclusively who don't have this problem, my guess is their mixture is poorly adjusted but I don't know if lean or rich encourages that build-up. I'm guessing lean, getting hot enough to cook the castor into that black stuff.
Sep 23, 2019, 12:33 PM
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Chuppster's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BernardW
Last time I had the LHS mix a batch of glow fuel for me I got 10% nitro, 16% synthetic (Cool Power) and 1% castor. I forget which of the red or green Cool Power oils is higher viscosity and which is nominally intended for 4-stroke, and the other for 2-stroke, but it really doesn't seem to matter much, both offer very similar protection for the engine. I'm not going to attempt to say what's "better" for any application, because as Jimbo says that discussion has run back and forth and back again for years... that type of "debate" never reaches a conclusion and it certainly can't be "won", it just keeps going, I prefer to get out of there before it gets personal. Any reputable brand will be good quality stuff, just select the nitro and oil ratios you want and you're safe.
Castor may be a preference thing really, I can't contribute any technical knowledge but I do know there are plenty of people out there using it, some using castor alone, some like me use just a dash, others maybe 50:50, people have their reasons. It's why I asked Chuppster if he chooses castor out of preference. Remember that for decades it was very widely used, it's before my time but AFAIK it once had the great majority of the market. So it certainly works alright.
Jimbo's post is a good one, all those factors he lists are design parameters for synthetic oils ie they are specifically developed to enhance those numbers. I suggest unless you know a specific reason to use all castor for your application, just use either an off-the-shelf glow fuel with the ratios you want, or if you're mixing your own, make it similar to those fuels. For just about every RC application with IC engines you can use synthetic oils alone and be totally confident in them, and if you want to use some castor then by all means. The oil ratio is more important than whether it's castor, synthetic or a mix.
I guess we'll have to talk about how much oil to use... the accepted standard seems to be 16 to 20% but there are people using much lower oil ratios, I've heard of down to 10% and even as low as 8% (for single-cylinder 4-strokes), but this is for experienced people who know their engines. If you want more info on that I'd recommend asking in the Club Saito thread. For most people most of the time, if you stick to the typical brews as recommended by the manufacturers then you know you're within spec. I believe many model radials use much lower amounts of oil in the fuel but that's a whole different matter. As far as singles and twins, in general just keep it standard. I've got a YS engine so I've been reading some threads about that, and it seems the YS's that keep running well for many years use 20/20 fuel, 20% nitro and 20% oil. Saito seems happy with somewhat less and it's Saito users I've heard running theirs on lower oil ratios. Personally I've been using 16 or 17%, never had a problem and they run great. Others brands, I haven't used.
Which reminds me... Saito manuals do say *not* to use all-castor oil. They don't say not to use any, but no more specific than that. There are 2 manuals available for some Saitos, the Horizon Hobbies version (as the distributor/agent for USA, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere) and a reasonably translated Japanese-English pamphlet included with the engine itself. In my FA-182TD manual it says "Fuel: Recommended good quality fuel (oil 20%) for glow engine use on the market, containing synthetic oil type with nitro content of approx. 5% to 15%. Since the four-stroke engine has high exhaust temperature and carbon is apt to accumulate when castor oil type lubricants are used, avoid using fuel"... yes, it does kind of fizzle out at the point where it says "avoid using fuel". OK, got that? Avoid using fuel. It's too dangerous That and the FA-130TD manual are on my Google drive
The Horizon Hobby manuals for Saito small to medium singles and for twin cylinders have the same wording for their advice on fuel: "1. Fuel. For maximum protection and longevity of Saito engines, Saito recommends a fuel containing 20% oil and 10-15% nitro methane. If this blend is not readily available, the next best selection is a high quality 2-cycle glow fuel, such as Cool Power, K&B, Power Master, etc. Fuels composed entirely of castor oil are not recommended. Use of such fuels will void the warranty."
So again, synthetic oils nominally intended for 2-strokes are fine in 4-strokes and vice versa, and don't use pure castor in 4-strokes, because it can't handle the high temperature of the exhaust valve.

I don't use any 2-strokes so I can't say anything about castor for those, except I've seen inside the head of one that was totally gunked with hard, crusty carbon-looking crud stuck together with burnt oil that was very difficult to remove. I've also known people using castor exclusively who don't have this problem, my guess is their mixture is poorly adjusted but I don't know if lean or rich encourages that build-up. I'm guessing lean, getting hot enough to cook the castor into that black stuff.
Thank you so much for the insight! This makes a lot of sense. I've read people's opinions as to why Castor is the best oil and whatnot, and I was thinking that if that's true, why use anything else? Sounds like a blend makes a lot of sense.
Sep 23, 2019, 01:31 PM
What could possibly go wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuppster
An important factor to me is the long term wear. I have done quite a bit of reading and it appears there's a lot of opinions out there. It seems that 100% Castor and 100% synth are fine, but castor is safer to use yet it gums up your engine a lot more. I wouldn't mind experimenting with oil concentrations and mixtures but I would want to be able to figure out how to measure engine longevity without doing "destructive testing". For instance, I think it would be nice to run 15% oil mixed 50/50 synth/castor, but if I was to test that how could I tell its ability to lubricate and cool the engine? Is taking note of the cylinder wall temperature enough? VP racing sells fuel with a 14% oil content, does that mean it's safe to use fuel with that little oil?
It might be worth posting your questions in Club Saito too, there are some highly knowledgeable people there on that topic and not just for Saito. They certainly seem to agree that 14% oil is safe and no problem for Saito and similar 4-strokes, provided that cooling, fuel/oil feed and tuning are adequate. Don't expect cooling problems in 4-strokes in the cylinder wall or between it and the piston ring, the heat issue is in the head where the exhaust valve and header are. I'd be surprised if you got enough of a cooling difference to care about between castor and synthetic, all else being equal.
What matters is air flow over the head (Saito has a one-piece cylinder and head), and that the mixture is tuned well so the engine doesn't overheat by running too lean. Those factors will have more bearing on heat and therefore wear and longevity than oil type. There are many Saitos reported running for over 20 years on all different oil types, so long as cooling, not exceeding max RPM's and avoiding lean conditions are attended to.

I see what you're getting at, will one oil type give you longer before the wearing parts need replacing. Honestly I don't think you'll get a consensus on that here or anywhere. So long as those factors are right and it gets an uninterrupted fuel feed and therefore oil they will last. For longevity you'd want to select props to limit RPM's to something safe. It's usually bearings that need replacing first. In a rebuild they generally do the piston ring while they're at it. I haven't heard much about worn rings but Club Saito will know.

What brand are those 4-strokes you're running? Some guys are posting that they've run theirs for years on down to 10%. But I don't know what amount of nitro that's with or how much difference that makes. You could always throw in a little castor on top.
For what it's worth, I use this logic for my fuel mix - I trust modern synthetics from known brands and from reading the most experienced people, 14% oil is fine for Saito engines, so long as they're in tune and not exceeding max RPM's, which is down to prop choice. I generally use 10% nitro but have tried 5 to 15% - changing nitro content requires a re-tune. So I now use 14% synthetic with 1% castor, on the advice of someone I know running the same engines as me for 30 years longer.
Castor is meant to be good at protecting the engine if it does end up excessively hot or if it suffers a power lean-out accidentally. I was told you get extra protection from the thin layer of "varnish" castor leaves behind on the wearing surfaces. It should look like no more than a colouration, not like a coat of paint ie. very thin. I took both my Saito singles apart a while back and that's exactly what I saw so it seems to work. I expect I could reduce it to 0.5% just fine and I know a guy who adds an oz or 2 to a gallon of fuel with otherwise synthetic-only oil. Even a little is supposed to be enough to help if it's ever needed.

I've read that good modern synthetic oils for RC engines actually have better protection all-round, but some added castor is worth using as above for those special situations. I imagine a car engine, how most wear occurs at start-up when it's cold and before the oil is up to pressure and temperature, so you have a blend of different viscosities etc for all conditions. The types we're posting about here are that type of blend. They'll keep developing these and improving performance, and one day some new type will conclusively beat even castor oil at the most extreme conditions. I basically count on synthetic oil but treat castor as an additive that works well at high to peak RPM and in case of trouble.
Sep 23, 2019, 01:57 PM
What could possibly go wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeismicCWave
...
Depending on the engine a 15% oil mix is pretty low for smaller and high performance engines. 15% oil is ok for some sport flying 4 stroke engines and the larger displacement 2 stroke engines. Definitely not as good for 2 stroke .90 and smaller. A bit too much oil never hurts an engine.
While I said that 14% or even lower is going to be fine *provided* you're doing everything else right, SeismicWave's advice is good. I should have pointed out that while you *can* lower your oil ratio, the idea of using more than the minimum is to give you some margin. Manufacturers have to know that even when less experienced people use their engines they will stand up to that use, even if they have too small a prop on it so it over-revs, or it might be leaned a little much in the quest for the highest peak power. So they'd rather have you use more oil than less. I guess the reason people are able to reduce that oil content is that they're doing everything else within safe limits, like engine RPM's and having the needles well tuned so it's not running too lean and hot. Like I said they know what they're doing.

If what you value is longevity and reliability then being a little conservative and keeping everything within the limits it's designed for is the wise choice. Don't push the envelope by reducing oil, leaning the mixture, hitting higher RPM's and so on. Looks like that also means for 4-strokes not to use all castor, I'd say no more than 50% and probably really 30% of oil content (in my case much less). It's not just about making a mess on the model, those build-ups in the cylinder could mean problems. if you've seen that carbon and oil crust then you know you don't want a piece of it breaking off and getting between the valve and its seat, which need to be an accurate fit and finish, honed to seat just so and free of nicks and scratches, also free of solids getting between valve and seat. In a rebuild they often hone it with toothpaste, that's how fine a finish you want. So obviously you don't want crud getting in there. Plus you don't want to upset the internal shape of the combustion chamber or it won't run right, that carbon and oil stuff can really build up and I've seen it take up a lot of the volume in there. That messes up the flow of the fuel-air mix and alter (increase) the compression ratio. Then you have a badly running engine, even if it's not actually got worn or damaged parts. One final reason not to go full castor, synthetic oils don't stain the model in my experience. Just a wipe with a thin detergent-water mix and it's clean. Maybe that doesn't happen on plastic film-covered models but I've seen it on silk and fabric.
Sep 23, 2019, 02:12 PM
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Chuppster's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by BernardW
It might be worth posting your questions in Club Saito too, there are some highly knowledgeable people there on that topic and not just for Saito. They certainly seem to agree that 14% oil is safe and no problem for Saito and similar 4-strokes, provided that cooling, fuel/oil feed and tuning are adequate. Don't expect cooling problems in 4-strokes in the cylinder wall or between it and the piston ring, the heat issue is in the head where the exhaust valve and header are. I'd be surprised if you got enough of a cooling difference to care about between castor and synthetic, all else being equal.
What matters is air flow over the head (Saito has a one-piece cylinder and head), and that the mixture is tuned well so the engine doesn't overheat by running too lean. Those factors will have more bearing on heat and therefore wear and longevity than oil type. There are many Saitos reported running for over 20 years on all different oil types, so long as cooling, not exceeding max RPM's and avoiding lean conditions are attended to.

I see what you're getting at, will one oil type give you longer before the wearing parts need replacing. Honestly I don't think you'll get a consensus on that here or anywhere. So long as those factors are right and it gets an uninterrupted fuel feed and therefore oil they will last. For longevity you'd want to select props to limit RPM's to something safe. It's usually bearings that need replacing first. In a rebuild they generally do the piston ring while they're at it. I haven't heard much about worn rings but Club Saito will know.

What brand are those 4-strokes you're running? Some guys are posting that they've run theirs for years on down to 10%. But I don't know what amount of nitro that's with or how much difference that makes. You could always throw in a little castor on top.
For what it's worth, I use this logic for my fuel mix - I trust modern synthetics from known brands and from reading the most experienced people, 14% oil is fine for Saito engines, so long as they're in tune and not exceeding max RPM's, which is down to prop choice. I generally use 10% nitro but have tried 5 to 15% - changing nitro content requires a re-tune. So I now use 14% synthetic with 1% castor, on the advice of someone I know running the same engines as me for 30 years longer.
Castor is meant to be good at protecting the engine if it does end up excessively hot or if it suffers a power lean-out accidentally. I was told you get extra protection from the thin layer of "varnish" castor leaves behind on the wearing surfaces. It should look like no more than a colouration, not like a coat of paint ie. very thin. I took both my Saito singles apart a while back and that's exactly what I saw so it seems to work. I expect I could reduce it to 0.5% just fine and I know a guy who adds an oz or 2 to a gallon of fuel with otherwise synthetic-only oil. Even a little is supposed to be enough to help if it's ever needed.

I've read that good modern synthetic oils for RC engines actually have better protection all-round, but some added castor is worth using as above for those special situations. I imagine a car engine, how most wear occurs at start-up when it's cold and before the oil is up to pressure and temperature, so you have a blend of different viscosities etc for all conditions. The types we're posting about here are that type of blend. They'll keep developing these and improving performance, and one day some new type will conclusively beat even castor oil at the most extreme conditions. I basically count on synthetic oil but treat castor as an additive that works well at high to peak RPM and in case of trouble.
To answer your question on what brands I fly, the answer is all of them. I have an old Saito Fat Head, an OS Suprass II, three origional OS Surpass, a Magnum, and an OS Gemini. I sometimes fly OS and Super Tiger two strokes.
Sep 23, 2019, 02:21 PM
What could possibly go wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuppster
To answer your question on what brands I fly, the answer is all of them. I have an old Saito Fat Head, an OS Suprass II, three origional OS Surpass, a Magnum, and an OS Gemini. I sometimes fly OS and Super Tiger two strokes.
That's a nice collection The OS Gemini has some great design features, one day I'd love to get one. While we're on the topic of nitro I'd like to one day fit a CDI spark ignition to my FA-182 twin, still keeping it on methanol. I'm told you get a handy increase in power even running it with zero nitro, and you can do that since the controlled spark timing makes starting so much easier. Even so just a little nitro is meant to still have benefits. I do like the 4-strokes, they're elegant little machines and the multi-cylinders are works of art. I bet you're enjoying those, great stuff. PS I've got a YS 4-stroke I've still never run, really looking forward to that one day too.
Sep 23, 2019, 03:15 PM
A man with a plan
Balsaworkbench's Avatar
Yeah, they really are wonderful little machines. The thing that bugs me most is when I'm sorry about not enjoying the use of one engine because I put the other on an airplane. This hobby is kind of crazy when you think about the psychology of it.
Sep 24, 2019, 07:05 AM
Need more speed!
Chuppster's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsaworkbench
Yeah, they really are wonderful little machines. The thing that bugs me most is when I'm sorry about not enjoying the use of one engine because I put the other on an airplane. This hobby is kind of crazy when you think about the psychology of it.
Are you saying it bothers you to have an engine that's not on a flying airframe?
Sep 24, 2019, 09:47 AM
A man with a plan
Balsaworkbench's Avatar
Something like that. I don't like collecting things I'm not going to use.

In my early days of RC I used OS FP engines, and I'm still fond of them. Since then I've collected several Saito 4 strokes that I enjoy. When I build a 60 size plane it's hard to choose whether to use a 60 FP or a Saito 65. Both of them provide the satisfaction of a finely crafted machine that runs flawlessly. There isn't enough time in the day to check everything off your list of fun things to do, so in this environment of abundance a lot of resources go unused.

I'm not saying that I am actually stressed out by this dilemma. But I'm aware that overabundance doesn't actually lead to happiness. I'm somewhat of a philosopher, and it occurs to me that people enjoy life more when there is adversity. I think engines were probably more fun when you could afford only one of them, and planes were more fun when you had to build the whole thing and it cost all of your spare money. Having too much of everything creates indecision, which doesn't enhance one's enjoyment of life.
Sep 24, 2019, 09:51 AM
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Chuppster's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsaworkbench
Something like that. I don't like collecting things I'm not going to use.

In my early days of RC I used OS FP engines, and I'm still fond of them. Since then I've collected several Saito 4 strokes that I enjoy. When I build a 60 size plane it's hard to choose whether to use a 60 FP or a Saito 65. Both of them provide the satisfaction of a finely crafted machine that runs flawlessly. There isn't enough time in the day to check everything off your list of fun things to do, so in this environment of abundance a lot of resources go unused.

I'm not saying that I am actually stressed out by this dilemma. But I'm aware that overabundance doesn't actually lead to happiness. I'm somewhat of a philosopher, and it occurs to me that people enjoy life more when there is adversity. I think engines were probably more fun when you could afford only one of them, and planes were more fun when you had to build the whole thing and it cost all of your spare money. Having too much of everything creates indecision, which doesn't enhance one's enjoyment of life.
You might be on to something. I constantly find myself surprised at how much time I have to spend organizing and storing the stuff I have, when really I just want to fly.
Sep 24, 2019, 10:04 AM
A man with a plan
Balsaworkbench's Avatar
Yeah! That's what I'm talking about.

I have a loft full of junk that my wife inherited. I had to build the loft just to store the junk. It would be nice if I could actually use the loft. My sons don't want the junk. As soon as we're gone they're probably going to have a big bonfire.

I have too many things myself, but I at least try to limit myself to things that relate to activities that I actually do. Even so, I still have too many things.


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