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Oct 19, 2019, 06:50 PM
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Ok, firewall done. The servo screws worked just fine thanks!
Between the wood strip in the back, the foam and the reinforced tape, the weight doubled, at nearly 16 grams, but at least it should be safe enough.

I have been an idiot for not drawing two lines just as wide as my metal ruler before forming the dihedral, to act as alignment guides for the motor case, and then size the pod accordingly. Instead I did none of that and ended up agonizing about the alignment
Well, we live to learn I guess

Do you advise to give some lateral thrust to the engine to counter torque or shall I simply align it as straight as I can?


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Oct 19, 2019, 07:02 PM
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I am slightly worried I might have put too much tape and weight with it.. the frame clocks at 110 grams now, on my kitchen scale, and 95 on my microscale, but it is not well suited to weight large objects, so that is probably incorrect.

I still planned to add a few rods made of bamboo skewers and shrink wrap, similar to what you showed me.

What should ideally be the frame weight for a very well flying one?

I have been experimenting with different ways to make the Y pushrods, but my servo extension cables are taking forever to come. They were supposed to arrive on Thursday and the seller already contacted me to ask for good reviews.. I am tempted to reply that I love how invisible they are

Anyway hopefully they will come soon.

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Oct 19, 2019, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McAl
I am slightly worried I might have put too much tape and weight with it.. the frame clocks at 110 grams now, on my kitchen scale, and 95 on my microscale, but it is not well suited to weight large objects, so that is probably incorrect.

I still planned to add a few rods made of bamboo skewers and shrink wrap, similar to what you showed me.

What should ideally be the frame weight for a very well flying one?

I have been experimenting with different ways to make the Y pushrods, but my servo extension cables are taking forever to come. They were supposed to arrive on Thursday and the seller already contacted me to ask for good reviews.. I am tempted to reply that I love how invisible they are


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My Super Easy ( video in post #47 ) weighs 377.4 grams with everything installed , including a 1000mAh 3S battery . I have the same motor on it that you have , except mine is 1700kv . Mine has enough power for an easy climb , loops , etc . When you fly : if you feel it is under-powered , with your 1500kv motor you can safely use an 8" prop with low-medium pitch ( 8x3.8 , 8x4 ) . The motor will be facing rearward on the plane , but it's very important that the prop is on the motor facing in the direction of travel ( forward ) .

You may be able to install the servos without servo extensions , as I did on mine ( see photo below ) .
Oct 19, 2019, 10:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McAl
Ok, firewall done. The servo screws worked just fine thanks!
Between the wood strip in the back, the foam and the reinforced tape, the weight doubled, at nearly 16 grams, but at least it should be safe enough.

I have been an idiot for not drawing two lines just as wide as my metal ruler before forming the dihedral, to act as alignment guides for the motor case, and then size the pod accordingly. Instead I did none of that and ended up agonizing about the alignment
Well, we live to learn I guess

Do you advise to give some lateral thrust to the engine to counter torque or shall I simply align it as straight as I can?

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Mount the motor assembly with the prop attached , so the prop is straight and centered in both the vertical and horizontal prop slots . Right thrust or down thrust are not effective when the motor/prop are mounted that close to the CG , they are only effective if the motor/prop are are on the nose or on the tail .
Oct 20, 2019, 11:53 AM
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That was some digging, trying to keep things straight, but getting there!

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Oct 20, 2019, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by McAl
That was some digging, trying to keep things straight, but getting there![IMG]https://uploads.tapatalk-
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Progressing nicely !
Oct 20, 2019, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
Progressing nicely !
Somewhat, yes

Actually, by comparing what I came up with your more elegant and practical solution, I am learning quite a lot.
I put ESC and and receiver on the opposite side of the wing for two reasons:
1) keeping the plane in balance by not placing one component only on the side
2) preventing the propeller from cutting the servo cables, in the eventuality the kiln would collapse in a crash or while landing, so I decided I needed to pass the cables on the wing instead

However, looking back at what you did, I realized that my reasonings were incorrect.
Placing the receiver and cables on the side of the kiln is the closest thing to place it in the middle of the plane, Conversely, placing it far on the wing as I did, and try to balance it with the ESC and relative cables, which weights differently, is actually more likely to cause balancing problems.
And looking again at the kiln, in a case of a really bad crash, it is way more likely to crack at the junction with the wings than in the middle so that it folds on itself, which is the only case which might cause the propeller to contact the cables.
So, I spent a bunch of time implementing a solution that is more trouble that else and added 15 grams or so of velcro trape
Also, I managed to place the receiver on the wrong side of the plane, meaning all my servos will need to be reversed at the trasmitter

So well, I learned quite a lot today, let's put it like that

If you can, I have a few questions:

1) Receiver antenna. I see you took care to orient the antennas on your receiver in specific directions. My receiver has only one, which in any case I will tape down, should I secure it to the kiln so that it points 90 degrees down perhaps?

2) Motor shaft. I realized that the shaft on my motor slides in and out a bit. I placed the prop saver so one screw bites in the indentation on the shaft (which I assume is there just for that purpose) If I pull on the prop saver, the shaft will slide out 5mm or so. Is this normal?

3) Securing the motor to the mount. In order to screw the mount in, I undid the fasteners. Once done I pushed in the motor all the way and tightened the fasteners. I did not want to overdo it, but they felt quite tight. While testing the motor (with no propeller, fortunatately, only a piece of tape) it came undone and slipped out of the mount. Should I glue it with CA?

Thanks!
Oct 20, 2019, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McAl
Somewhat, yes

Actually, by comparing what I came up with your more elegant and practical solution, I am learning quite a lot.
I put ESC and and receiver on the opposite side of the wing for two reasons:
1) keeping the plane in balance by not placing one component only on the side
2) preventing the propeller from cutting the servo cables, in the eventuality the kiln would collapse in a crash or while landing, so I decided I needed to pass the cables on the wing instead

However, looking back at what you did, I realized that my reasonings were incorrect.
Placing the receiver and cables on the side of the kiln is the closest thing to place it in the middle of the plane, Conversely, placing it far on the wing as I did, and try to balance it with the ESC and relative cables, which weights differently, is actually more likely to cause balancing problems.
And looking again at the kiln, in a case of a really bad crash, it is way more likely to crack at the junction with the wings than in the middle so that it folds on itself, which is the only case which might cause the propeller to contact the cables.
So, I spent a bunch of time implementing a solution that is more trouble that else and added 15 grams or so of velcro trape
Also, I managed to place the receiver on the wrong side of the plane, meaning all my servos will need to be reversed at the trasmitter

So well, I learned quite a lot today, let's put it like that

If you can, I have a few questions:

1) Receiver antenna. I see you took care to orient the antennas on your receiver in specific directions. My receiver has only one, which in any case I will tape down, should I secure it to the kiln so that it points 90 degrees down perhaps?

2) Motor shaft. I realized that the shaft on my motor slides in and out a bit. I placed the prop saver so one screw bites in the indentation on the shaft (which I assume is there just for that purpose) If I pull on the prop saver, the shaft will slide out 5mm or so. Is this normal?

3) Securing the motor to the mount. In order to screw the mount in, I undid the fasteners. Once done I pushed in the motor all the way and tightened the fasteners. I did not want to overdo it, but they felt quite tight. While testing the motor (with no propeller, fortunatately, only a piece of tape) it came undone and slipped out of the mount. Should I glue it with CA?

Thanks!
Yes , I learn something every time I build a plane ..... and it's fun to experiment with different techniques and ideas to see what works and doesn't work .

The servos will only need to be reversed if they move their control surfaces in the wrong direction . Correct rudder movement ( left-and-right ) is easy to see as viewed from the rear . And correct elevator movement is easy to remember if you think of it this way : if you were in the pilot's seat of an actual airplane holding the control stick ..... you push the nose down ( down elevator ) , and you pull the nose up ( up elevator ) . See video in post #75 .

1) if a receiver has two antennas , they should be at a 90 angle to each other . If a receiver has only one antenna , just attach it so it's straight .

2) a) does the shaft slide out of the prop saver or the motor ? If the shaft slides out of the prop saver , tighten up the prop saver's grub screws with a little thread lock or CA .
b) if the shaft slides out of the motor , does the bell of the motor pull out with the shaft ? If so , check the rear of the motor to see if the C-clip ( retainer ) is missing .
c) does the shaft pull out of the bell ? If so , check the grub screws that hold the bell to the shaft . If they are loose , tighten them back up with a little thread lock or CA . Be careful to not get any CA on any part of the motor where you don't want it .

If the C-clip is missing on the rear of the motor , it will still work as a pusher set up ( like a Super Easy ) . It will not work as a tractor set up , the thrust of the propeller may pull the bell/shaft out of the motor .

3) Yes , carefully glue the motor to the mount .... and use thread lock or CA on the two grub screws . Be careful that you don't get any glue in the rear of the motor where the shaft , bearing and C-clip are . I usually use epoxy for gluing the motor to the mount . I first insert the motor into the mount about 2mm , then I apply a tiny bit of epoxy to the motor tube ( all around ) before fully inserting the motor tube into the mount . As far as I know , epoxy is more heat resistant than CA .
Oct 21, 2019, 11:25 AM
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Here is a video of a motor torquing itself out of it's motor mount ( pardon my french ) , luckily the only consequence was some twisted wires . After this incident I began gluing my motors into their motor mounts , and using thread lock on the grub screws .


More throttle....duh.....oh $#!& ! (1 min 22 sec)
Oct 21, 2019, 11:55 AM
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Thread OP
A case for less throttle and more glue, most definitely

That is like I imagine my first flight to go pretty much Ok, I am a converted, I will glue it.

Regarding the shaft, it is actually the prop saver to slide, I got confused because some tape was covering the top making it look like the shaft moved, I will glue it in place too.

I work from home and my kid is off school for the week, so I wisked out a mini glider and let him make his own while I worked.
We will give them a go at the park on our way to the shops.



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Oct 21, 2019, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by McAl
Regarding the shaft, it is actually the prop saver to slide, I got confused because some tape was covering the top making it look like the shaft moved, I will glue it in place too.

I work from home and my kid is off school for the week, so I wisked out a mini glider and let him make his own while I worked.
We will give them a go at the park on our way to the shops.


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Good news that it is only a loose prop saver ! Be sure to use some thread lock or CA on the prop saver's two screws' threads . And use at least two bands to hold the prop on .

How close to maiden flight is the Super Easy ?
Oct 21, 2019, 02:20 PM
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BTW , here is a successful flight of that plane in the fail video :




Symmetrical SUE deltoid RC plane (4 min 2 sec)




Last edited by balsa or carbon; Oct 21, 2019 at 02:27 PM.
Oct 22, 2019, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
BTW , here is a successful flight of that plane in the fail video :




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VG-TzYwEy8



It seems to fly very nicely, a bit of an acrobatic spaceship, kind of!
Nice rolls, I would find it very confusing to do a roll with that plane, given it is symmetrical.
Oct 22, 2019, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by McAl
It seems to fly very nicely, a bit of an acrobatic spaceship, kind of!
Nice rolls, I would find it very confusing to do a roll with that plane, given it is symmetrical.
For orientation , I put orange tape at the bottom .

I was inspired to build that plane by RC Groups member sr71afan , here is a video of his ( he's an incredible RC pilot! ) :




Deltoid Workout... RC Style (7 min 45 sec)





How goes your Super Easy ?
Oct 22, 2019, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
Good news that it is only a loose prop saver ! Be sure to use some thread lock or CA on the prop saver's two screws' threads . And use at least two bands to hold the prop on .

How close to maiden flight is the Super Easy ?
Well, I had a pretty busy day, but I decided to try and get on with it nonetheless,

I changed the position of ESC and receiver, so they are closer to the kiln and mounted the servos in the opposite direction (with the cables coming ou towards the back of the plane), so not to have to reverse controls on the remote.
I also glued the motor in with epoxy.

Then I moved to making another Y pushrod out of two welding tigs, trying to make the angles exactly symmetrical.
The welding tigs are in principle a good idea, but hard as hell and very rigid. I found it very hard to make a proper 90 degree bend with pliers with the tigs, probably I should have gone for 1,2mm rather than 1,6mm, but I had no clue when choosing.
Anyway, because I was having trouble making decent Z bends, and I did not want to spoil the Y pushrod, I decided to use pushrods connectors for all servos and horns instead.

And here hell started.
On one hand, trying to work faster, I decided to mount all the connectors at once, and putting epoxy right away on the nuts.
So, I later realized that ideas, like mounting the connectors under the servo arm rather than upward, were quite silly, given it make it impossible to turn the screw on the connector without taking out the arm. And in some cases it would have made sense to put the nuts on the other side.. But I had already glued them all
Also, because it is impossible to flex the tigs without deforming them, I went through actrobatics to adjust things, not to mention to trim the tigs to size once installed. The only thin nosed cutter I had broke (fair enough, it is meant to cut much thinner wire), so I had to somewhat extract the Y pushrod to trim it with larger tools. It was a mistakes feast to be honest.

The final result is not exactly wonderful.
I think the throw on my elevator is off. They are parallel at certain angles, but not all..
Also, the rudder is not perfectly in line with the kiln, if the top align the bottom will not. This is partially because the kiln bends a bit at the tip, which I could correct with a few BBQ skewers, But also probably because the rod is not in line with the servo. I thought it was, but I guess cooking dinner for my kid while taking breaks to glue control horns is not a good idea

So, well, it might fly, but probably not too straight.. Now I am really exhausted and need to go out very early tomorrow, but hopefully on Thursday I might be able to check things again, correct what I can and finally bring it to the park to give it a go..

I will post some photos.


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