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Sep 25, 2019, 11:47 AM
Bagpipes spoken here
Pipemajor's Avatar
Lazy eights are shaped like the infinity symbol



You can learn this by pulling your model up into a half loop - then when you get to the top of the loop (when the model is inverted), reverse and apply down to perform another half loop to bring the model back to upright again - albeit much higher than when you started. Some call this a 'backwards S' maneuver. Probably safest to learn and just apply up until the model is flying vertically straight up then apply down to turn back to upright. The amount of time you hold the initial up command can be increased to ease into the backwards S or the lazy eight.

Very handy to learn that up is up when flying upright and up is down when flying inverted.
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Sep 26, 2019, 06:37 AM
Registered User
I used to have the book by Dick Mathis and he suggested using lazy eights as a way of learning how to fly inverted. In essence, as you got comfortable with the maneuver you would keep stretching the inverted portion until you could fly a full lap upside down. It made it easy. I loaned the book to someone I knew and never got it back. Bummer.
Sep 26, 2019, 06:49 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by viva_peru
I used to have the book by Dick Mathis and he suggested using lazy eights as a way of learning how to fly inverted. In essence, as you got comfortable with the maneuver you would keep stretching the inverted portion until you could fly a full lap upside down. It made it easy. I loaned the book to someone I knew and never got it back. Bummer.
This?
https://www.amazon.com/How-Fly-U-Con.../dp/B0006CM3LQ
Sep 26, 2019, 01:17 PM
Registered User
That is the one. When my mom traveled to the U.S. she would stop the Orange Blossom Hobby Shop in Miami. Back in those days Les McDonald used to work there. I believe he was the one who suggested the book to her. I think that I was 15 or so at the time.
Oct 10, 2019, 01:58 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Jwellsy, I assume by now that you've been back out and had some handle time. How is it going?

Back when I learned control line maneuvers I started with loops and wing overs on an .049 Goldberg Stuntman 23. No inverted fuel tank on the Baby Bee so no negative G stuff. Later I got my first "stunt tank" model and was able to do my first horizontal 8. And inverted came pretty fast from there by just flattening out and making the 8's longer and longer just like the guys are saying.

About a year after that I was in with a group that flew a lot of combat and I caught the bug. Using the whole hemisphere in all manner of inside and outside turns followed rapidly from there. In fact if you want a model to learn this stuff which would be less of a risk for bench time a combat style model or something with less emotional connection such as an ARF Flite Streak might be worth some consideration.
Oct 14, 2019, 04:19 PM
Detail Freak
target's Avatar
My advice is:

If you cannot get a good engine run, then just skip ahead/behind to electric.
The power run is everything in control line, and you won't be able to concentrate on the flying if you are struggling with the power.....
Love me or hate me, as a relative newbie to CL, that is a key observation from me.

I am lucky to have a great engine mentor, and also have a tiny bit of glow saavy under my belt to use, so glow works pretty well for me.
I can however see huge advantages in e power.... WITH added dangers from the battery and possible injuries if not properly treated.

And, second, plane trimming is EVERYTHING!
This is where having help will REALLY save you time and confusion/headaches. Do NOT go it alone if you don't have to. The difference between a well trimmed plane and a badly trimmed plane is simply not believable.

You'll see!

Good luck to you sir!!
Nov 11, 2019, 09:04 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
I found the Dick Mathis book and read it three times. But, I guess experience is the best teacher. This weekend I discovered why maneuvers are performed down wind and the upwind leg needs to be low. After several turns around the circle, when going from directly into the wind and turning to cross the wind upwind of me I was too high for my speed and the wind got under the wing and pushed more slack in the lines than I could deal with and my Nobler lawn darted itself. Not a pretty sight, but was entertaining for the peanut gallery. I do have a Ringmaster ready to go so I'm ready to try again.


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