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Aug 26, 2019, 02:31 AM
Sticks, Tissue & old Diesels
brokenenglish's Avatar
Chris, I think Dunlop actually dates from pre-war. Certainly it was used during and immediately after the war.
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Aug 26, 2019, 07:17 AM
ffkiwi
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenenglish
Chris, I think Dunlop actually dates from pre-war. Certainly it was used during and immediately after the war.
I'm surprised to learn that actually-rubber being a strategic material I thought any use for something as frivolous as model aircraft would have been frowned on as wasteful extravagance...

ChrisM
'ffkiwi'
Aug 26, 2019, 02:10 PM
Registered User
ChrisM
Not as frivolous as all that!
After all in the 1930's and 40's (and even earlier in the 20th century - my dad built and flew a rubber driven plane in about 1914 in Pheonix Park, Dublin) aeromodelling was encouraged being an essential part of aviation development, and most aeromodellers , and there were millions of them, built rubber driven planes. Just imagine the amount of rubber consumed by 'toy plane' fliers in those interesting and exciting years. I should imagine that the profit margins on strip rubber were much, much higher than on car and plane tyres (tires).
I'm not surprised at all by all this.!!
Nick
Aug 26, 2019, 04:09 PM
So I'M meant to be in control?
Colonel Blink's Avatar
....plus don't forget that during WWII, it was imperative to encourage 'air mindedness' amongst teenagers, especially those approaching the age where they could volunteer to be aircrew....
Aug 26, 2019, 04:24 PM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Rubber was obviously available during the war, maybe hoarded pre-war stocks. I recall reading a description of Flt Lt Watson flying a rubber model - maybe this one https://outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=3807 - whilst waiting around for the call to scramble - he had to have an "erk" act as a fetchermite since he needed to stay near his aircraft!
Aug 26, 2019, 07:15 PM
ffkiwi
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundancer
Rubber was obviously available during the war, maybe hoarded pre-war stocks. I recall reading a description of Flt Lt Watson flying a rubber model - maybe this one https://outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=3807 - whilst waiting around for the call to scramble - he had to have an "erk" act as a fetchermite since he needed to stay near his aircraft!
Yes-the model in question was actually published as 'Wattie' in Aeromodeller. My earlier comment re frivolity was more a comment on how the UK authorities might have viewed a request to allocate rubber for model aero strip during wartime. I do know the flying of power models was banned in the UK....and later partially rescinded "only permitted N of a line between ......... and ....." meanwhile on the continent things were somewhat different depending on where you were and how heavy the hand of the local occupation authorities was....I gather diesels and ignition engines were still being manufactured in France during the war years-in limited quantities-Switzerland of course was neutral, and some modelling seemed to be happening in Scandinavia over the period. Of course in Germany it was fully organised under the auspices of the Hitler Jugend organisation ....but even in Germany, during the war-rubber would have been a strategic material in increasingly short supply.....

I don't recall ever seeing any mention ANYWHERE of aeromodelling activities in central Europe during the war years-though I imagine a similar situation prevailed-it would depend on the attitude of the local occupying authorities to aeromodelling...

ChrisM
'ffkiwi'
Aug 26, 2019, 07:32 PM
ffkiwi
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickharp
ChrisM
Not as frivolous as all that!
After all in the 1930's and 40's (and even earlier in the 20th century - my dad built and flew a rubber driven plane in about 1914 in Pheonix Park, Dublin) aeromodelling was encouraged being an essential part of aviation development, and most aeromodellers , and there were millions of them, built rubber driven planes. Just imagine the amount of rubber consumed by 'toy plane' fliers in those interesting and exciting years. I should imagine that the profit margins on strip rubber were much, much higher than on car and plane tyres (tires).
I'm not surprised at all by all this.!!
Nick
Nick See my later comment above. I used frivolous not in the sense of the actual modelling-which was seen as quite respectable in the Edwardian era-but how the authorities would view a request to allocate a strategic resource-namely rubber-during wartime. Given the age of some of the rubber already produced in this thread-and modellers normally being inveterate hoarders-no doubt there was prewar stock strip available to some.....we also tend to forget-that while rubber was an obviously strategic material in wartime....so was balsa....not only for aircraft use-Swordfish and Mosquito immediately spring to mind-but also for lifebuoys and rafts on ships.

Modellers were extraordinarily well catered for quite early on-attached below is a scan from the 1992 FF Forum which shows a 1912 catalogue page (probably Gamages, in London)...

ChrisM
'ffkiwi'
Aug 31, 2019, 05:00 PM
Registered User
This might be a bit late Douglas, but have you considered a small electric motor with lipo & simple FF timer instead of rubber ?
This video illustrates how simple it can be :
Simple Electric Free Flight Timer (4 min 19 sec)
Last edited by patmcc; Aug 31, 2019 at 05:08 PM.
Aug 31, 2019, 05:08 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
I hadn't, and will gladly learn more on the subject from the video referenced, pasted here for the convenience of others...

Simple Electric Free Flight Timer (4 min 19 sec)


Thanks for the recommendation; it's an option which could be very useful. I'll still want to be able to replace existing rubber motors, though, or build others when the lights go out and mechanical stuff becomes King once more. Clockwork 'planes, maybe..?



I've received, no later than this very morning, my supplies from Mike at Free Flight Services, and am now stocked up for... Well, quite a long time.

Edit : Neat trick; I'll certainly be trying that out. My biggest problem will be getting any 'plane I make to be capable of staying long enough in the sky to warrant such a circuit.
Thanks for the link.
Last edited by Dad3353; Aug 31, 2019 at 05:16 PM.


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