Thread Tools
Jul 16, 2019, 06:27 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Discussion

How much longer


I know this question may be tough to answer but here goes... How long does it take some of you before it “clicks” when learning to fly a CP Heli. I have been flying for about a year and find it almost impossible to fly in stunt mode. I think auto level may be hurting more than helping?
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Jul 16, 2019, 07:08 PM
Registered User
creativepilot's Avatar
I highly recommend getting a simulator. Realflight 8 or Accurc on Steam. If you can't afford a simulator perhaps get the PhoenixRC simulator online.

The more you practice on the simulator the better you become.

Also things to get motivated on the simulator:

join online(multiplayer). That may help you to be more encourage to learn new maneuvers.

Listen to some relaxing music.

Watch youtube videos of simulator practice.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClq...r9rki1Oh0IU9PQ

The more you practice on the simulator, the quicker you will learn.
Jul 16, 2019, 10:29 PM
Registered User
Thickfog's Avatar
Get a sim. You'll learn more in one week on it than all year on a real heli.

Real life flying.... It took me a year and then that was still just lame forward circuits.

I never really had a click moment. It was slow, tedious, never ending sessions and learning and picking up more on each flight.

It's not impossible as it feels right now. I was at these stages thinking I'd never get it and didn't have the skills some guys have to do this. Not true. It only feels impossible. It's not.

So once you have your orientations down and forward flight I'll say reverse and inverted are then easier to pick up. It's the getting past the initial learning stages of orientation and forward flight.
I still have not tried reverse inverted. I promised myself I'd be proficient and comfortable with inverted by the end of summer/fall. Maybe this winter I'll learn inverted backwards.

Also don't kid yourself as these are actually some of the fun days, albeit frustrating. You'll see what I mean when you get better. Once you get at least 40 seconds of forward flight down comfortably you'll be friggin grinning ear to ear. It's possible the best time you'll have with helis - - right there in those few steps when you kinda start your forward circuits.
Is that a click moment? I guess so.

Sent from my SHIELD Tablet K1 using Tapatalk
Jul 17, 2019, 01:38 AM
Registered User
Suckerpunch's Avatar
Quote By Thickfog:
Also don't kid yourself as these are actually some of the fun days, albeit frustrating. You'll see what I mean when you get better. Once you get at least 40 seconds of forward flight down comfortably you'll be friggin grinning ear to ear. It's possible the best time you'll have with helis - - right there in those few steps when you kinda start your forward circuits.
Is that a click moment? I guess so.

I absolutely agree with Thickfog on his quote.I was grinning ear to ear on my first controlled forward flights,i couldn't get enough of it!!
And yes,in my opinion that is a "Click" moment.Honestly,your "Click" moments will always be something your chasing learning one maneuver to the next new maneuver,those "Click" moments will never go away for as long as your involved in this heli hobby.
As others have mentioned (and most don't want to hear it) practice on the sim to achieve your next click moment.
So to your initial question,were all different and what i mean by that is everyone has a different learning curve and i think that's what it boils down to in terms of how long before it clicks...
Jul 17, 2019, 09:11 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
I do have a simulator. Real flight 8. Money isn't a big problem. Would it be best to stick to one particular heli? I bought a Fusion 360 thinking it would be a lot easier to fly than my 230 but that definitely is not the case.
Jul 17, 2019, 09:40 PM
Registered User
gimbleguy's Avatar
The bigger the heli the easier to learn on. But don't go too big, for now. Also this is very important, make sure you master your maneuvers in the simulator first, before trying IRL.

380mm size helis are ideal. Trex 470L, X3L are some of the helis I use.

Make sure you got a good FBL gyro and it's working/configured properly.
Last edited by gimbleguy; Jul 17, 2019 at 10:17 PM.
Jul 18, 2019, 01:59 AM
Registered User
Hard to say how long it took for me. I have been flying since the 70's and at times I think it still is not clicking. Some days I can do whatever I want, and other days I don't feel good about doing much more than basic flight. Often it is the field or helicopter I'm flying. If the background is the wrong color, or the lighting wrong or a host of other reasons I take it easy. It usually clicks the best when flying a cheaper helicopter that I don't care as much about.
Jul 18, 2019, 12:28 PM
Registered User
Thickfog's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roto Rob
Hard to say how long it took for me. I have been flying since the 70's and at times I think it still is not clicking. Some days I can do whatever I want, and other days I don't feel good about doing much more than basic flight. Often it is the field or helicopter I'm flying. If the background is the wrong color, or the lighting wrong or a host of other reasons I take it easy. It usually clicks the best when flying a cheaper helicopter that I don't care as much about.
I just noticed that I loose orientation and my mind when flying in overcast skys: it's like my brain shuts off. Unreal.

I had trouble with forward flight two days ago. And i can do that and inverted I like nothing usually. Weird.
Jul 18, 2019, 01:59 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mkonop
I know this question may be tough to answer but here goes... How long does it take some of you before it “clicks” when learning to fly a CP Heli. I have been flying for about a year and find it almost impossible to fly in stunt mode. I think auto level may be hurting more than helping?
What CP helicopter are you flying and where are you flying it? What transmitter are you using?

I learned basic orientation on a MCX2. Thinking that I had this helicopter thing pretty much in the bag, I then bought a Nano CPS. Long story short, even in safe mode, the CPS is much squirrelier and things happen a lot faster.

Even if you think you know orientations, you up having to learn them all over again when you move to a CP copter. This is because in a relatively slow-moving and docile CP copter, you will do more "move the stick this way and see what happens, oh wait that was the opposite of what I want, better move the other way" than you think you are doing. At least that is how it was for me. Do that in a Nano CPS, even in safe mode, and you are likely to hit a wall, at least if you are flying indoors.

I thought that the Nanos were unflyable in stunt mode. Even when I tried it outdoors, the Nano would shoot off in some random direction and my attempts at correction inevitably made things worse and led to a crash.

Part of the problem was that I didn't know then how to set them up or calibrate them. Part of the problem was practice. Things got a lot easier when I bought a decent transmitter. This felt like a gamble, since I didn't really know how to fly yet. I also eventually found out that the Nanos were much easier to fly in stunt mode if I took off already in stunt mode.

But long before I learned to fly the Nano CPS in stunt mode, I came by a cheap MCPX and rebuilt it. It didn't have a safe mode, so I didn't have a choice whether to fly in stunt mode or not.

The upshot was long hours of flying in my living room, first learning to hover and then following behind my MCPX and trying to do circuits, first left hand, then right hand, then back again. And crashing. A lot. The weather was too cold and windy to fly outside, so I was reduced to gouging the walls and also myself. They also say that you will learn to be an expert helicopter mechanic long before you will become an expert helicopter pilot. This is most certainly true.

Eventually I got it, sort of. I remember that day when I could first turn off safe mode in a Nano CPS and hover unsteadily. Buzzing in front of me was living physiological proof that the Nano CPS was not unflyable in stunt mode. I called the kids to witness this moment. "See anything different? See the little light? What color was it before? Well that little light was blue. Now it's red! Red! Red I tell you!"

Then I probably crashed. Only light scarring.

But that day was when the light really started to turn on. Soon I was doing circuits in the backyard, then figure eights. A couple months later, I was beginning to learn aerobatics.

I have never used a simulator. I am not saying whether to get one or not, but it can be done without one.
Jul 21, 2019, 11:23 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prawnik
What CP helicopter are you flying and where are you flying it? What transmitter are you using?

I learned basic orientation on a MCX2. Thinking that I had this helicopter thing pretty much in the bag, I then bought a Nano CPS. Long story short, even in safe mode, the CPS is much squirrelier and things happen a lot faster.

Even if you think you know orientations, you up having to learn them all over again when you move to a CP copter. This is because in a relatively slow-moving and docile CP copter, you will do more "move the stick this way and see what happens, oh wait that was the opposite of what I want, better move the other way" than you think you are doing. At least that is how it was for me. Do that in a Nano CPS, even in safe mode, and you are likely to hit a wall, at least if you are flying indoors.

I thought that the Nanos were unflyable in stunt mode. Even when I tried it outdoors, the Nano would shoot off in some random direction and my attempts at correction inevitably made things worse and led to a crash.

Part of the problem was that I didn't know then how to set them up or calibrate them. Part of the problem was practice. Things got a lot easier when I bought a decent transmitter. This felt like a gamble, since I didn't really know how to fly yet. I also eventually found out that the Nanos were much easier to fly in stunt mode if I took off already in stunt mode.

But long before I learned to fly the Nano CPS in stunt mode, I came by a cheap MCPX and rebuilt it. It didn't have a safe mode, so I didn't have a choice whether to fly in stunt mode or not.

The upshot was long hours of flying in my living room, first learning to hover and then following behind my MCPX and trying to do circuits, first left hand, then right hand, then back again. And crashing. A lot. The weather was too cold and windy to fly outside, so I was reduced to gouging the walls and also myself. They also say that you will learn to be an expert helicopter mechanic long before you will become an expert helicopter pilot. This is most certainly true.

Eventually I got it, sort of. I remember that day when I could first turn off safe mode in a Nano CPS and hover unsteadily. Buzzing in front of me was living physiological proof that the Nano CPS was not unflyable in stunt mode. I called the kids to witness this moment. "See anything different? See the little light? What color was it before? Well that little light was blue. Now it's red! Red! Red I tell you!"

Then I probably crashed. Only light scarring.

But that day was when the light really started to turn on. Soon I was doing circuits in the backyard, then figure eights. A couple months later, I was beginning to learn aerobatics.

I have never used a simulator. I am not saying whether to get one or not, but it can be done without one.
I have an IX12 and have been flying a 250CFX, Nano S2, Fusion 180 and 230s V2
Jul 21, 2019, 11:22 PM
Registered User
I had a 9958 to learn upright orientations, it flies like a fixed pitch heli, but has bad tendencies... stuff I had to unlearn. if you want to learn to fly without stabilization, you just have to do it... don't use stabilization mode while you are learning to fly without it... I mean not at all. I will parrot "use a sim" because it works, but it's like doing home work, really, no one just can't wait to get home and use the sim. I forced myself to do 30 minutes a day, the rest was with an old Hisky HCP100 (not S) it had no stabilization, so between that and the sim, I learned... of the helis you mentioned, I would use either the s2 or the 230S. move your safe to a switch, the bind button is just too hard to find. keep a finger ready to hit it, and get it in the air... if you can't take off without stabilization, it's okay to use the stabilized mode to get it in the air, then switch to IU1. stick with hovering at first, and fly as high as you can, 20 to 30 feet should do it with the 230, 10 to 15 with the s2. you just need time to realize you're in trouble, hit the switch, and have the heli recover before it hits the ground. once you get used to flying without stabilization, and no longer need safe to recover for you, start taking off in IU1... with your throttle hold on, move the stick to 0 pitch (mid position) and release throttle hold. either of those helis will kick in with soft start, and be ready to go withing 15 or 20 seconds. then you can easeup on the stick and be ready to use cyclic to keep it level at liftoff. you'll get it, it should be easier with that panic button handy, I sure wish I had one
Jul 22, 2019, 11:12 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mkonop
I have an IX12 and have been flying a 250CFX, Nano S2, Fusion 180 and 230s V2
Mostly flying indoors or out?


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion Renamed: How do I make a simple, cheap foam scratch-build fly for MUCH longer batata003 Foamies (Scratchbuilt) 322 Feb 08, 2019 12:22 PM
Discussion How much longer will my AP prop last? ghoti Aerial Photography 17 Aug 13, 2006 02:46 PM
Discussion Gitmo-how much longer martin richards Life, The Universe, and Politics 67 Feb 17, 2006 06:52 PM
Cool Fantastic Models Mig 15, F-86??? How much longer?? mike93 Parkflyers 2 Mar 05, 2002 08:34 AM