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Jul 15, 2019, 09:58 PM
Misfit Multirotor Monkey
Cyberdactyl's Avatar
Thread OP
Discussion

What We Saw - Apollo 11


Semi-technical history of the history of Apollo 11.

Bill Whittle does a very nice job.

Apollo 11: What We Saw | Part 1 - We Choose to Go to the Moon (1 hr 3 min 46 sec)


Apollo 11: What We Saw | Part 2 - The Clock is Running and We're Underway! (1 hr 1 min 7 sec)


What We Saw: Apollo 11 | Part 3: In the Beginning... (1 hr 7 min 32 sec)


Apollo 11: What We Saw - Part 4 | Magnificent Desolation (1 hr 36 min 58 sec)
Last edited by Cyberdactyl; Jul 20, 2019 at 10:59 AM.
Jul 16, 2019, 12:22 AM
Takka-Takka-Takka
leccyflyer's Avatar
Fifty years ago today - what an amazing epoch-defining achievement. I’m loving the various documentaries that are showing at the moment. So much has changed in the last half a century and so much remains the same. Very very

Here’s a thread from a decade ago with some video of the event from a youngster’s perspective and, if You Tube have forgiven the transgression , a lovely take on what it means to some folks and their dreams. RIP Mary.
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...ostid=12790855

Visit to Cape Kennedy for Apollo 11 Launch - July 1969 (4 min 24 sec)
Jul 16, 2019, 04:50 AM
Registered User
Looks like the Observation Island.
I was on a destroyer on station off Bermuda at the time. I watched the exhaust trail, as in your video, pass directly overhead.
Secondary recovery, Atlantic. In the event of an abort during boost, never needed us thankfully.
Latest blog entry: My first blog entry
Jul 16, 2019, 05:32 AM
Registered User
I was barely a teenager back then and though I watched the telecasts live, I was a lot older before I fully understood the risks that were taken (or thought I did)
The background information that has been shown in recent in-depth reporting has shown things that I was not fully aware of previously and has been fascinating to watch.
A wonderful achievement and yet one that some people still deny happened in spite of the evidence.
The short series of follow-up landings and the eventual demise of the manned exploration shows, sadly, that the imagination that put men on the moon didn't thrill enough of the population or, importantly, the politicians.
Maybe now, after decades of inaction, we shall see another spurt, another spark of inspiration and more achievement.
If the politicians allow
Jul 16, 2019, 06:26 AM
turn, turn, turn.
I remember there was a lot of death surrounding the space program.
Jul 16, 2019, 07:26 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Sharp
I remember there was a lot of death surrounding the space program.
Probably not near as risky as living in Chicago, Detroit, or Philadelphia, or working for the Clintons.
Latest blog entry: My first blog entry
Jul 16, 2019, 08:03 AM
turn, turn, turn.
All I know is that you had to be a hero to go into space.
Jul 16, 2019, 08:39 AM
Registered User
I had been home form Vietnam one day when they set foot on moon.
Took my new Cannon FTQL film camera and took a black white picture stepping on moon.
Wife beside me watching our big 19" TV. Life was good.
Jul 18, 2019, 03:33 PM
Misfit Multirotor Monkey
Cyberdactyl's Avatar
Thread OP
Added PART III to the OP.
Jul 18, 2019, 04:14 PM
Alarm Bells Softening!
Big Foot 48's Avatar
I kept the newspaper.... and still remember exactly the words I spoke when images of the landing appeared on TV: "Marilyn (wife), wake up, we've landed on the moon".
Last edited by Big Foot 48; Jul 18, 2019 at 04:24 PM.
Jul 18, 2019, 04:16 PM
Seriously?
BE77 Pilot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Sharp
I remember there was a lot of death surrounding the space program.
Yeah, death of the USSR.
Jul 18, 2019, 06:32 PM
turn, turn, turn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BE77 Pilot
Yeah, death of the USSR.
That was Chernobyl.
Jul 18, 2019, 07:26 PM
Love & a Molotov cocktail
Punkie's Avatar
At work a reminder went out about how the company worked with Francis Thomas Bacon to develop the first practical fuel cell.
Quote:
As funding levels increased the apparatus was moved again to what was then the Department of Chemical Engineering. There the team overcame problems of corrosion of the oxygen electrode by soaking the new nickel electrodes in lithium hydroxide solution followed by drying and heating. In 1959, with support from Marshall of Cambridge Ltd. (later Marshall Aerospace) a 5 kW forty-cell battery, with an operating efficiency of 60%, was demonstrated publicly.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Thomas_Bacon

Pratt and Whitney then developed it further to be used on the Apollo craft.

American President Nixon told him; "Without you Tom, we wouldn't have gotten to the moon.

Well done the USA for achieving such an amazing feat.
Jul 18, 2019, 09:30 PM
Figure Nine Champ
madsci_guy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenny Sharp
I remember there was a lot of death surrounding the space program.
The US space program? Not a whole lot considering the experimental nature of the vehicles.
Prior to the Shuttle accidents, there were only 4 astronaut deaths, IIRC
Jul 18, 2019, 10:00 PM
turn, turn, turn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by madsci_guy
The US space program? Not a whole lot considering the experimental nature of the vehicles.
Prior to the Shuttle accidents, there were only 4 astronaut deaths, IIRC
That's a lot of death. Those guys were heroes.


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