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May 28, 2019, 09:10 PM
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nhk750's Avatar
That is really cool for 1/4 scale big bird. Weighs 25 pounds!
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May 29, 2019, 06:59 AM
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AA5BY's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azoic
Something simple. Something small. Something cheap.
NONE OF THE ABOVE !!!
BUT this thing is bloody gorgeous......it is a snap together though, so isn't that hard, it still fits novice builder class.
Nice home for the new Saito 100cc twin gas.
https://valprorc.com/products/la-7-kit
Does it fit the motor glider requirement? Hmmm..... maybe.
May 29, 2019, 12:08 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by AA5BY
Does it fit the motor glider requirement? Hmmm..... maybe.
Well, he DID also say "sport model".... And I SUPPOSE that "easy" is a relative term.......
May 30, 2019, 10:54 AM
Aviation Nerd
Thread OP
I have thought about building from plans. I could get some plans from the AMA plans service. I have looked at the Terrier ES and thought it would be cool to build. I might just have to do this.
May 30, 2019, 11:35 AM
Registered User
Sig 4star20 !
May 30, 2019, 12:19 PM
Registered User
AA5BY's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Williams RC
I have thought about building from plans. I could get some plans from the AMA plans service. I have looked at the Terrier ES and thought it would be cool to build. I might just have to do this.
I took a look... looks like a good choice.
May 30, 2019, 02:30 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Williams RC
I have thought about building from plans. I could get some plans from the AMA plans service. I have looked at the Terrier ES and thought it would be cool to build. I might just have to do this.

If you continue building, you will almost certainly find yourself building from plans..... because relatively few kits are still in production and getting legacy kits via private sales/swaps is hit and miss and can be pricey AND because the range of plans available for free download (as well as for sale by outfits such as AMA) from outerzone and the whole RCMagazine plans inventory.


But a first build from a kit as opposed from plans is likely cheaper - because most of components are included in one buy - and presents less of stiff learning curve because key wood components have already been formed and the instruction manuals are typically more elaborate/don't take "basic knowledge" for granted.
Hence the several recommendations here for the Sig Four Star (there is even an electric version).


If doing a first build from plans/magazine article, look first at the (free downloadable) manual for the kit of a similar plane (eg. the Sig Four Star 20) for tips and the importance of doing things in sequence/thinking several construction steps ahead) as well as reading "sticky" help threads on forums, asking basic questions, etc.


Michael in Ontario, Canada
May 30, 2019, 03:41 PM
Sagitta Fanboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2michaely
If you continue building, you will almost certainly find yourself building from plans..... because relatively few kits are still in production and getting legacy kits via private sales/swaps is hit and miss and can be pricey AND because the range of plans available for free download (as well as for sale by outfits such as AMA) from outerzone and the whole RCMagazine plans inventory.
This I disagree with, there are likely more kits in production today than anytime previously. They simply aren't available via your local hobby shop or the big distributors but rather via internet sellers for the most part. I think Manzano Laser Works alone has more kits available today than Hobbico ever offered at a single point in time, and Manzano is one of many kit producers today. The availability of cut to order production methods and direct selling allows small kit cutters to offer kits that may only sell one or two copies a year without losing their shirts in stocking low production kits, while operations like Hobbico could only practically maintain kits that sold at high rates, otherwise stock maintenance killed them.

Quote:
But a first build from a kit as opposed from plans is likely cheaper - because most of components are included in one buy - and presents less of stiff learning curve because key wood components have already been formed and the instruction manuals are typically more elaborate/don't take "basic knowledge" for granted.
Hence the several recommendations here for the Sig Four Star (there is even an electric version).


If doing a first build from plans/magazine article, look first at the (free downloadable) manual for the kit of a similar plane (eg. the Sig Four Star 20) for tips and the importance of doing things in sequence/thinking several construction steps ahead) as well as reading "sticky" help threads on forums, asking basic questions, etc.


Michael in Ontario, Canada
Agree with the rest of this. It's quite good advice.


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