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May 21, 2019, 12:45 PM
Registered User
aeronaut999's Avatar
I like the "all altitudes". They were probably talking about me, that's my home field.




!KIDDING!
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May 21, 2019, 01:09 PM
FPV REBEL ALLIANCE
Nightstone's Avatar
Drones have clearly defined altitude restrictions. Don't go above 400'.

Real planes kinda sorta have rules... If im out flying fpv in the middle of no where some jerk can repeatedly buzz my flying site at 100'.

With more and more drone users everyday its just a matter of time till we have a real incident.

All my real plane incidents have been with planes/helicopters on the deck and flying fast. It takes time to get a large photography multi rotor down from 400'. And real hard to keep an eye on the drone while trying to figure out where the threat is coming from.

Really simple to fix... planes stay above 500'. Drones below 400'. Not going to happen though as pilots in this country are a privileged class. At least not till we have an incident thats bad enough.

NS

Also wanted to point out... Out in the desert its really hard to get a fix on a plane when they are that low to the ground. They blend in to the ground both from the air and from the ground. You often get little to no warning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent-AV8R
When RC models and drones are as easy for a manned pilot to see as a manned aircraft is for the person flying the sUAS, I agree. But the reality is that our stuff is nearly impossible for a manned aircraft pilot to spot. Hence the responsibility is on us to do most of the seeing and avoiding.
May 21, 2019, 02:26 PM
FlyLikeAnEagle-LandLikeADove
u2builder's Avatar
We have full scale planes "buzz" our RC field fairly regularly in aerobatic type planes and some other sport planes. They come in through the gap in the trees at tree top level after making a high pass or two. Of course they are doing it for us, and we stop flying and enjoy the show. We had a couple military jets make some way high passes a couple years ago. We are in the boonies, Class G all the way for many miles.

I've had friends buzz my home many times over the years. Couldn't have been more than 200' high most times.
May 21, 2019, 02:29 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by u2builder
We have full scale planes "buzz" our RC field fairly regularly in aerobatic type planes and some other sport planes. They come in through the gap in the trees at tree top level after making a high pass or two. Of course they are doing it for us, and we stop flying and enjoy the show. We had a couple military jets make some way high passes a couple years ago. We are in the boonies, Class G all the way for many miles.

I've had friends buzz my home many times over the years. Couldn't have been more than 200' high most times.
It's pandemic.
May 21, 2019, 03:25 PM
Registered User
If these aircraft become ADS-B equipped, then indentifying them is real simple. They will be continuing broadcasting their N number. All you need to do is to note the time and location, then call the local FAA FSDO.

The full scale hobby also has a set of bad actors that cause us all problems.
May 21, 2019, 05:47 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by u2builder
We have full scale planes "buzz" our RC field fairly regularly in aerobatic type planes and some other sport planes. They come in through the gap in the trees at tree top level after making a high pass or two. Of course they are doing it for us, and we stop flying and enjoy the show. We had a couple military jets make some way high passes a couple years ago. We are in the boonies, Class G all the way for many miles.

I've had friends buzz my home many times over the years. Couldn't have been more than 200' high most times.
I'm quite jealous
All we get here is passing police helis and the occasional hot air balloon..........
May 21, 2019, 06:01 PM
Registered User
This is a great video.

Rules for Drone Hobbyists - 2019 (12 min 17 sec)
May 21, 2019, 08:07 PM
Team Futaba
Silent-AV8R's Avatar
Thread OP
One huge major point missed in this. These are NOT rules yet and will not be until the FAA incorporates them into the FARs. Even the FAA wrote exactly that in the notice posted to the Federal Register.

Quote:
The guidance provided in this notice is not legally binding in its own right and will not be relied upon by the Department or the FAA as a separate basis for affirmative enforcement action or other administrative penalty. Regardless of whether you rely on the guidance in this document, you are independently required to comply with all existing laws applicable to the operation of unmanned aircraft systems.

Conforming your actions with the guidance in this notice does not excuse or mitigate noncompliance with other applicable legal requirements.
May 21, 2019, 08:29 PM
Registered User
Yes that is true.

It is also true you can stand in the middle of the tracks and watch the headlight of an oncoming train and say I am still OK.

All of this coming, now we need to get ready.
May 21, 2019, 10:03 PM
Commander, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
franklin_m's Avatar

NEW FAA MEMO - RECREATIONAL sUAS


Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent-AV8R
One huge major point missed in this. These are NOT rules yet and will not be until the FAA incorporates them into the FARs. Even the FAA wrote exactly that in the notice posted to the Federal Register.
I think it’s a distinction w/o a difference. Until they are rules, it is correct to say they are not legally binding “in their own right.” But that is only in an exceptionally narrow technical sense.

What unquestionably IS binding is the law from which they’re derived, almost word for word in most sections.

So the net result of this narrow distinction is that if FAA wants to pursue legal action in the meantime, they would cite violation of 349 vs violation of a FAR. I do not think that’s a very meaningful distinction, certainly nothing I’m willing to stand in front of a adjudicator and argue. And certainly nothing that will provide a get out of jail free card that some might be led to believe.
Last edited by franklin_m; May 21, 2019 at 10:08 PM.
May 21, 2019, 10:18 PM
Team Futaba
Silent-AV8R's Avatar
Thread OP
What they are is a set of operating guidelines, not rules or regulations, that the FAA would prefer us to follow. There is a very large distinction, that being as long as you do not run afoul of any other actual regulations there is no penalty for not following these guidelines.

And the FAA cannot cite 349, since they clearly stated, as you yourself have pointed out, that the guidelines are not legally binding in their own right.
May 21, 2019, 10:48 PM
Registered User
kell490's Avatar
Is 400 feet now the law entire US no exceptions the jet's and pylon racing I would say easily hit around 600-700 feet high without much effort.
Last edited by kell490; May 21, 2019 at 11:24 PM.
May 22, 2019, 12:32 AM
Team Futaba
Silent-AV8R's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by kell490
Is 400 feet now the law entire US no exceptions the jet's and pylon racing I would say easily hit around 600-700 feet high without much effort.
It is not yet incorporated into the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR). FAA has issued a guidance in preparation for that to become law, but right now it is just that, a guidance.
May 22, 2019, 04:33 AM
pushing the envelope
rcgroupie's Avatar
Wow. This just got a lot worse:
Quote:
The US government has issued an alert warning that Chinese-made drones could pose a cyber-espionage risk to American businesses and other organisations that use them.
I din't even know DJI 'drones' were transmitting data back to DJI via the internet!

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-48352271

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcgroupie
Now have researching delivery 'drones' in a bit more depth. Aside from the monopoly issues, there are privacy issues.
If joe perv is in my backyard pointing his camera at my bedroom window he is going to do some hard time in the slammer. If google or damazon is operating delivery 'drones' they will surely have to incorporate 4K res cameras pointing in all directions just to be safe. If I catch one in my back yard with one or more 4K cameras pointing at my bedroom window I will definitely file felony complaints against the operator and the corporation. If they try to argue that they don't record anything or that the info is secure and can't be leaked that will be a joke, and even if true it is still a felony for the operator and the company that hires them to be peering into peoples bedroom windows from their backyard.

There is another excuse that they may try to use however, that may have implications for members of this board. "Well, we're not experts in this drone thingy we just sell books. We hired a consultant to advise us in this kinda thing and he has a resume a mile long with impressive credentials and he should have advised us so he is civilly an criminally liable, not us." Of course both parties are going to be held liable for both civil and criminal offenses.
May 22, 2019, 06:19 AM
BFMA #13, aka Rogue 13
mongo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcgroupie
Wow. This just got a lot worse:

I din't even know DJI 'drones' were transmitting data back to DJI via the internet!

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-48352271
you are kidding, right...

i mean they are made in china, where the government has it's hands in EVERY THING.


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