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Jul 31, 2019, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Allen Dye
No, I haven't made any thrust adjustment yet. Last Sunday I flew the Lil Esquire for the first time with my Mule single channel transmitter. First flight it was going right, and climbing a little to steep. Luckily the engine decided to quit early and I got it down ok. Second flight with a turn of left rudder and a turn of down elevator, it was turning a little left under power, controllable with just an occasional click of left rudder and not climbing as steep. Glide at low throttle was pretty straight. Landed ok our small field. Third flight with a half turn more down, the the climb was where I wanted it, so I flew it for around ten minutes, decending with low throttle, climbing with full throttle and cruising at mid throttle. I came in to land and didn't realize I was drifting across the runway until a tree on the edge suddenly got in the was. I over corrected at low altitude to miss the tree and hit hard enough sideways the break the landing gear plate off the fuselage. That's all the damage, so it will fly again next Sunday. This time I may add just a touch of right thrust to get it to fly straight at both low and full throttle. It's a bit of a challenge hitting our field with a single channel plane as it's only 90 feet wide and little less than 300 feet long, with an electric fence around it to keep the cows out. There's also trees and equipment on the right side with the normal wind, so it not the big open field you usually see single channel planes flown off of in vidios.
The joy of single channel!
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Aug 01, 2019, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dan berry
The joy of single channel!
53 years ago when I was flying single channel I had the use of the whole 3000 foot long runway at our local airport. There was hardly any traffic then and nobody to tell a young man not to. It was pretty easy to line up a single channel on approach and hit somewhere on that runway or the mowed grass beside most of it. Things have changed a lot since than. Now I'm forced to land on what seems a postage stamp or the rough and in some places swampy field around our flying field. The world was so much simpler back then.
Aug 02, 2019, 03:27 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen Dye
53 years ago when I was flying single channel I had the use of the whole 3000 foot long runway at our local airport. There was hardly any traffic then and nobody to tell a young man not to. It was pretty easy to line up a single channel on approach and hit somewhere on that runway or the mowed grass beside most of it. Things have changed a lot since than. Now I'm forced to land on what seems a postage stamp or the rough and in some places swampy field around our flying field. The world was so much simpler back then.
Preachin' to the choir.
Aug 13, 2019, 10:52 AM
Balsadustus Producerus
Allen Dye, you probably already know this. With a rudder-only, you can get the airplane in a position where it dives, then climbs, then dives, and so on. What I do, is wait until it's climbing at a somewhat high speed, then make a turn, steep enough to 'g' load the airplane and bleed off speed/energy. Roll out when you have the desired speed. This takes a bit of practice and works well. Sometimes, when flying a four-channel .60-powered airplane, I find myself doing that with it, just like a S/C R/O model

Another trick, might help for small-field operations, is wait until the airplane gets on final and descending toward the numbers, and wiggle the rudder back and forth a few times. For some reason, this tends causing the nose to rise, which can help the descent rate and get down a little sooner. This even works with a pulse rudder system, such as the ACE R/C Pulse Commander, or the current Tobe pulse actuator. Just run the rudder back and forth a bit slower than the rudder is pulsing, and it works
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Aug 13, 2019, 03:20 PM
Registered User
Balsabird, thanks for the advise. My Lil Esquire is finally trimmed such that it flies nicely. Having throttle control means you don't spend much time using steep turns and dives to control altitude. With three position throttle, it climbs at a decent but not overly steep rate on full throttle, cruises around pretty much as a constant altitude on half throttle and decends with a shallow glide at idle, shallow enough that it lands without bouncing. The only problem I have with it is hitting our small, fence enclosed runway without undershooting or overshooting. With a breeze to contend with, that can get tricky. I still manage it most flights, but once in a while I screw up. Landing short isn't too bad, usually just causing a flip in the tall weeds on the approch end of our runway, but landing long can cause damage, as that can have the airplane being stained through the fence wire, something I would rather not have happen.


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