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Mar 11, 2019, 09:10 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Discussion

Making a Door into a Building Table?


I picked up a nice, straight hollow core door (80"x34") the other day for my next building table. I'm looking for some suggestions on how to frame it and add legs to turn it into a useful work surface. The only issue is I would like to not have it end up massively heavy duty and bombproof because I will need to break it down on occasion to allow the building room to become a guest room again. Because of this, I am wondering if leaving the door loose on top of a separate frame with the legs on it would be the best way to go?


Mark
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Mar 11, 2019, 09:41 PM
The Junk Man
My main building board is a 24" hollow core door, set upon two trestles. It is clad in light sheet metal from Home Depot and I use magnets exclusively for on-the-board assembly. No more sticking pins into ceiling tiles, wood or cork.

Tom
Mar 11, 2019, 09:49 PM
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Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by T_om
My main building board is a 24" hollow core door, set upon two trestles.
Thanks for the pics. Since you posted it, are there more details on your honey pot glue holder?

Trestles = saw horses?


Mark
Mar 11, 2019, 10:07 PM
The Junk Man
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmattock
Thanks for the pics. Since you posted it, are there more details on your honey pot glue holder?

Trestles = saw horses?


Mark
Trestles are similar to saw horses and can be used as such. These were quickly made from 1x6 lumberyard stock.

Honey pot below.

Tom
Mar 11, 2019, 10:18 PM
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Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by T_om
Trestles are similar to saw horses and can be used as such. These were quickly made from 1x6 lumberyard stock.

Honey pot below.

Tom
Excellent, thanks. One last question - how high is your work surface and do you work standing or sitting?


Mark
Mar 11, 2019, 10:36 PM
The Junk Man
I work standing and prefer a rather high bench. I am in the house tonight and will measure when I go out to the shed tomorrow.

Tom
Mar 11, 2019, 11:14 PM
Play that funky music right
kenh3497's Avatar
One screw in each corner would be more than enough to secure the door to what ever frame you put under it.

If you use 2 X material for legs a hole can be drilled in the bottom of each leg and a lag screw put in to use as a leveling device. I would be concerned about a twist being induced into the door. Part of the reason for the lag screws so that could be adjusted out. An easy way to check for a twist is to use two strings, one at the front and one at the back. Place the strings on small blocks so they are suspended from right to left above the table surface. Now step back "some" and sight across the strings. If you only see one string you are good to go. If one corner is high or low the strings will separate and tell you which corner to adjust.

Ken
Mar 12, 2019, 08:42 AM
Summit Model Aeronautics
Steve85's Avatar
I don't remember where I got them, but my building surface is held up with a pair of the metal legs used for folding tables. If I need to put the bench away, it's easy to fold the legs up.

Just Googled around a bit and Wal-Mart has these legs for $25 a pair.

Steve
Mar 12, 2019, 09:07 AM
The Junk Man
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmattock
Excellent, thanks. One last question - how high is your work surface and do you work standing or sitting?


Mark
I measured this morning... the building surface is 38 inches high.

And there is no need to attach the door to the trestles at all, it just sits there. Easily moved aside if needed.

Tom
Mar 12, 2019, 09:17 AM
Registered User
Hard to beat the "Wal-Mart" legs mentioned above..... they tuck up against the bottom of the "table/door" when you need the space

Michael in Ontario, Canada
Mar 12, 2019, 10:03 AM
Scott
Pylonracr's Avatar
Doors make great building tables. The only problem I can foresee is dramatic changes in humidity might cause the door to warp.

Scott
Mar 12, 2019, 10:21 AM
The Junk Man
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pylonracr
Doors make great building tables. The only problem I can foresee is dramatic changes in humidity might cause the door to warp.

Scott

Nope. Hollow core doors are torsion boxes. Do a Google search. They are about immune to warping.

Tom
Mar 12, 2019, 10:51 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenh3497
I would be concerned about a twist being induced into the door.
That's one of my concerns as well and part of why I think floating the door on a frame or stands is a good way to go.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve85
I don't remember where I got them, but my building surface is held up with a pair of the metal legs used for folding tables. If I need to put the bench away, it's easy to fold the legs up.
Are they high enough to work while standing? I used to use an old drafting table for my work surface but got rid of it years ago when space was an issue and I wasn't actively building and flying. Now that I'm getting space and time again I am rebuilding my modelling kit to suit what I have space for.


Quote:
Originally Posted by T_om
I measured this morning... the building surface is 38 inches high.

And there is no need to attach the door to the trestles at all, it just sits there. Easily moved aside if needed.
Thanks, Tom. I am thinking loose on top of legs or a frame is looking good for me as well if I don't find a set of folding legs that work height-wise. Even a set of these saw horses would work with a 2x6 added to the top for extra height:

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/hus...ck-/1001012218


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pylonracr
Doors make great building tables. The only problem I can foresee is dramatic changes in humidity might cause the door to warp.
As Tom says, they are built as a torsion box so they don't warp easily. Also, I live in central Alberta and our humidity is low and pretty steady so it isn't much of an issue for me compared to people in coastal areas and the like.


Mark
Last edited by mmattock; Mar 12, 2019 at 10:57 AM.
Mar 12, 2019, 12:18 PM
The Junk Man
For the price of those Home Depot saw horses, you could build a dozen of my trestles, customized for the right height from the get go. And get'em done in a short afternoon.

Tom
Mar 12, 2019, 12:51 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by T_om
For the price of those Home Depot saw horses, you could build a dozen of my trestles, customized for the right height from the get go. And get'em done in a short afternoon.

Tom
You haven't seen the wood prices up here!

But your point stands, they would be cheaper and I can get exactly what I want out of them without tweaking.


Mark


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