Thread Tools
Jun 19, 2019, 01:46 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
For whatever reason, the original Builder of this 'plane had not fitted the rib caps to the upper side of the ailerons (perhaps that was the next task to do when he decided to not continue the build..?). Not that difficult to rectify; here they're clamped up...



... and are now sanded down, waiting to be lined up for control horn fitting. To that end, the servos have to be fitted to their respective trays; here they're assembled and clamped to ensure that the blocks stay correctly aligned whilst the Titebond sets...



I'll then be able to see where to add a block or plate for the control horn on the ailerons.
It's getting close to the moment when I have to decide how to cover this Cub. Basically, it comes down to a choice between two: iron-on film, close enough to 'Cub' colour', or laminating film and tissue, airbrushed to a similar hue. I think I'll discuss with Our Eldest, and see what, if any, preference he has. Once decided, this wing can be fairly quickly completed. Next step: the empennage...
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Jun 20, 2019, 09:08 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
These dinky little balsa blocks have been shaped to fit the aileron profile...



... and have now been glued in place. The control horns will, of course be fitted after covering. Our Eldest expressed a firm preference for the iron-on film, not least because of the inconvenience of the dope used for applying tissue over laminating film. So be it; iron-on it'll be.
Back to the fuselage for now, though. Having fitted the wing, I find, in a bag of 'bits' that came with the 'plane, a pair of balsa blocks that are to be shaped to form the 'brows' above the windshield. Having traced a guide line, some whittling is in order to get close, despite the danger to my clumsy fingers...



... then a similarly risky session with the disk sander. One is just about finished, the other is 'raw'...



And here they are, glued and clamped in place, after some finishing touches with the sanding blocks...



The slight discrepancies that crept in give the Cub a slightly quizical look. Unintentional, but there's a certain charm to it (or is it just my imagination..? ).
Jun 21, 2019, 08:47 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP

Modified Empennage Fitting ...


I have trouble understanding how (and why...) SIG made this empennage to be assembled the way they did, and have asked for advice elsewhere on the Forum. That offered so far, although useful, doesn't inspire me with enough confidence to pursue their method. I've continued looking all across t'web at these 'planes, from various makers and several scale sizes. They mostly seem to do things the 'orthodox' way, so I think I'll do the same. Here, then, is the tailplane being glued up as one piece...



I don't see any advantage in using dowels as a joiner here, so these two halves are joined with 6mm square balsa, cut to exactly the same length as the dowels. I checked the width and straightness against the pre-built elevator, then clamped it up, with the steel rules to maintain the piece nice and flat. Once set, I'll fill the centre section with 6mm sheet, then see about installing the platform precisely horizontal, using the fin post as a vertical datum. Probably tomorrow, now, as I'm off to play drums this evening; it's the annual 'Fête De La Musique' In France today, and our group has been asked to play our local pub. More tomorrow, then...
Jun 21, 2019, 09:01 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
With a few minutes spare to fill, I fetched down the other, Berkeley, Cub that's to be restored, and tidied up a few detail points, such as removing the flimsy undercarriage, and also the redundant fuel tank and engine bearers that had been sealed into the nose, as she'll be electric. Here's her current (sad...) state...



... and with the SIG fuselage, for comparison ...



It can be easily imagined why I chose to start on the SIG Cub..!
Jun 22, 2019, 03:33 PM
Registered User
E-Challenged's Avatar
After covering the fuselage and painting the windshield and side window frames, you will probably be ready to install the windscreen. I make a pattern out of file folder and trial fit it to the model trimming until it just overlaps the side pillars and fits the top structure. Then I scribe the pattern onto the clear plastic material. Next, I pre-make pin holes through the top where pins will go into. Do this by forcing pins through plastic into scrap balsa. Next I apply RC-56 canopy glue to the side pillars and clamp the plastic to the side pillars. Lastly I apply canopy glue to the top of fuselage structure and pin top of windshield to wood using long nose pliers to hold end of pins and force them through the plastic into the wood. You can wipe up RC-56 with a damp Q-Tip while still wet. Minor messes turn crystal clear when glue dries completely. It stays somewhat rubbery. After windscreen glue is thoroughly dried, you can remove pins, and install side windows. Pre- make pin holes in plasticside windows where they attach to rear cabin sheeting and side window frames and pin gently/carefully to hold side windows in place while RC-56 dries. You can run a bead of RC-56 around base of windshield and let it dry if desired. You can apply matching 1/8" yellow tape strip to base of windscreen and side window frames. I have made a mess and redone the windscreen on some models, better have some extra plastic sheet. Anything gets easier with trial and error practice!!
Last edited by E-Challenged; Jun 22, 2019 at 03:43 PM.
Jun 22, 2019, 08:19 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Thanks for the above ^^, E-C, I'll keep it in the front of my thoughts when the time comes. The windscreens I've done previously, on open-cockpit 'planes, have been stuck on using clear silicon bathroom caulking, which worked out reasonably well. I understand the pin-holes pre-pricked, and have both a decent stock of glass-headed pins and long-nosed pliers. I'm less confident about having a steady hand, but I'm sure it'll work out OK if I can follow the method calmly and with patience.
A fair way to go before then, but it certainly gives me something to think about, and prepare for, and it's maybe not so far off, either..!
Jul 08, 2019, 05:00 AM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
I've been following this thread with interest, as I built the Berkeley Cub when it was near new ! '50's,? '60's? Anyway, mine was control line with a McCoy .35 installed...
I like these restoration projects.. Your Berkeley tells a story only some of us can hear. Kudos on your efforts.
Thank goodness for builders, and innovators.. and those with a respect for history. -carry on.
Jul 08, 2019, 06:22 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Cheers, Earl, although the Berkeley will be a bit of a slow progress, I fear; more 'fits and starts' than much else. Next step will be rebuilding the airframe, probably, but I'll need space to lay out the copy of the original plan, which is huge..!
Jul 11, 2019, 08:04 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
If there's one thing I find a chore with model 'plane building (and there is; I'v got a list...), it's hinging. First comes the knotty problem of choosing the best type of hinge, including making sure one has the necessary hardware and tools, but there comes a time when, whatever technique has been decided upon, bullets have to be bitten. Today is such a day...
The rudder and elevator will be pinned hinges, and I happen to have a set left over from the Aeromaster kit which are now surplus. They seem to be just right for this 'plane, so a-slotting we shall go. Here's the start of operations, if that's not too strong a term for this task...



A centre-line is marked onto both fin post and rudder, and the centre point for the pair of hinges, too. The wood is soft enough to be slotted using only the Dubro Kwik-Hinge slotting tools. This goes off rather smoothly, for once, and the two parts can be dry-fitted rapidly...



Not quite so easy for the tailplane and elevator, though. The balsa is much harder, and I call upon the splendid little Higley slotting tools to help get the Dubro set started. This works for the elevator, although much force is needed, putting the very structure at risk (and my aching arms for good measure...). The tailplane resists being punctured even more, so I turn to the ultimate in slotting tools, in the form of my oscillating multi-tool (a GP Slot Machine on steroids..! ), which gets the better of this hard balsa, providing intense massage for my arms at the same time. A bit extreme, maybe, and not without some risk, but the results are there, and the pieces can now be hinged...



I've used a black marker to highlight the slots, with their centre points, hoping that, after covering, I'll be able to see enough through the yellow film as a guide. It's not critical, as a blade will easily find 'em, but it may help.
Next step, then, is covering these items; maybe this afternoon, we'll see...
Jul 11, 2019, 08:45 AM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
There is nothing wrong with the DuBro hinge slotting tools.

However, a club member brought along a newer design, shaped much like a drawing of a Christmas tree... He raves about it..

I don't have a favorite... I switch between a sharpened broken Hacksaw blade, the DuBro tools, a 'Slot Machine, and a 3/16 " drill.....(Mainly, whichever I can locate at the present time) …
Jul 11, 2019, 09:11 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Jul 11, 2019, 09:27 AM
AndyKunz's Avatar
I have a set of the DuBro tools. I think the only purpose they will serve henceforth is to open wider slots made using a Slot Machine.

Andy
Jul 11, 2019, 03:37 PM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
'Slot Machines' are incapable of slotting spruce... I need new blades...…..
Jul 11, 2019, 05:22 PM
AndyKunz's Avatar


Harbor Freight has a saw and blades that will work for you. They're a bit thicker, but they do a great job.

Andy
Jul 13, 2019, 05:35 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Covering has started on the empennage, here's one side of the fin done, and one side of the rudder being prepared...



... and the finished pair ...



It's only 'cheap' Chinacote, but it went on very easily, and responded well to both the iron and the low-power heat-gun that I use. Next up (tomorrow, probably...): the tailplane and elevator.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help! I may have bitten off more than I can chew...please help Drickster Nitro and Glow Power Cars 34 Aug 09, 2016 07:30 PM
Alert Armed McDonald's robbers bit off more than they could chew Ron van Sommeren Life, The Universe, and Politics 3 Jun 09, 2016 12:58 AM
Discussion Biting off more than I should chew Joshuarat Balsa Builders 9 Apr 23, 2013 01:00 AM
Discussion Did Sgt Schultz bite off more than he can chew ? D B Cooper Life, The Universe, and Politics 5 Jan 16, 2011 11:36 AM
An Apology.......(or why you should not bite off more than you can chew) Steve McBride Electric Plane Talk 16 Jan 24, 2003 10:42 PM