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Aug 28, 2018, 12:31 PM
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Build Log

Two Avro Arrows


Introduction

This has to be the coolest looking aircraft ever devised. Being Canadian, there is a special place in my heart for the Arrow.

Just finishing up the first, 28" wingspan, powered by a single 64mm fan on 4S. This is a rough prototype, a proof of concept, before diving into the next which will be approximately a 48" span with dual 70mm fans on 6S, balsa covered fuse, and balsa covered wings; nearly scale.

Before getting into the build log for the larger version, lets take a brief look at the simpler, smaller version.


Arrow One

Construction is Econocote over EPS, no plans just 3views and memory and TLAR methodology. There are a few things that are most certainly not scale, but at 50mph and 100' away, it should look pretty good. .

I went with a fully symmetrical foil that is considerably thicker than scale. The wing was cut out with a root template and a stationary point just beyond the wingtips, this resulted in a large delta wing absent the midwing notches that provide instant identification of the aircraft. The notches were added later by cutting the outboard section of the wing parallel to the leading edge and inserting a triangular piece of foam to push out the leading edge and create that distinctive notch.

Slots were cut into both sides of the wing in two places to stiffen the wing, the spars are cedar, 3/16" X 1/4". They are profiled in the center to reduce the obstruction to the airflow entering the EDF.

The fuselage is cut with a wire in two parts, front template is rectangular, rear is two side by side circles. Fan was test fit, the 64mm fan was a tight squeeze and resulted in a less than scale upper deck of the fuselage which rises slightly above where the wings join. Foam pieces were glued in place to smooth the airflow and direct it into and out of the fan.

The fan is glued in place with silicone and gaps in fairing sealed with silicone also. Vertical stab cut from foam, with a balsa rudder, balsa elevons also.

I was hoping to be able to use styrofoam cups as a base for the tailcones, but could not find anything with the right dimensions. ended up making my own by taking a piece of paper rolled into a cone, and wrapping that in a thin sheet of EPS, turned out quite nicely. Exit is approximately 90% of FSA. Static thrust is about 28 ozs, and an RTF weight should be around 24 ozs. Given the low wing loading, and high thrust to weight, she should have a wide speed envelope for scale like flight and opening her up should create afterburner like performance.

A balsa tray is set into the airflow to accommodate the radio gear and battery. Center of gravity will be 25% back (not including the elevons) which should be safe, this results in all the gear nestling inside the fuse, and an empty nose section. Cheater holes are cut into the fuse at this stage on both sides, they are relatively well hidden and should not be too susceptible to debris entering the airflow.

With the wiring routed, and everything in place and tested, the top of the fuselage is glued in place along with the canopy section. Access to most of the gear is now impossible with out deconstruction. Next the vertical stab is glued in place and the Arrow is almost complete.

All meeting pieces are blended into one another and covering is applied to the fuselage and meeting points. Radio gear is jammed into the tray with nary a vacant space leftover.

All that remains at this point is control surface linkages, louvers over the cheater holes, final detailing and insignia., and final weigh in and balancing. I will update these later this week, and hope to have video to show of the maiden following this upcoming Sunday.

Cheers.


Maiden

Wind was calm, a light toss and it climbed out at about a 45 degree angle, cut to 1/2 throttle at about 75' and I flew a few circuits. Very difficult to tell the top from the bottom and easy to lose orientation if your not paying attention. Flies well at very low speeds at just under 1/2 throttle, move to full throttle and it picks up speed rapidly. It is big and light so it is somewhat limited in its top speed, but I would estimate a respectable 50-60mph.
Center of gravity was a bit back, so control was oversensitive, but most surprising was the rudder. The slightest rudder deflection would drop a wing 90 degrees in a heart beat.

I have since moved the CofG forward 3/8", which should make for a more solid platform.

With a bit more weight in the nose it tracks a bit better, but doesn't slow down as well, so I took a bit out. On the next flight I brought it up to speed only to have the vertical stab abandon its post. The rest is kind of a blur, it was all over the place, I cut throttle and it fluttered into some long grass next to the canal. Only damage was a wrinkly nose but that will iron out, and of course the vertical stab will need to be re-attached more vigorously.
Last edited by foamnpacktape; Jan 01, 2019 at 11:19 AM.
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Aug 28, 2018, 12:33 PM
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Arrow Two

Sept 3 (2 hours printing plans, figuring out scale, cutting template), Arrow number two, 46" wingspan, two 70mm fans.

This plane will be built for a friend, Adrian. Adrian has some 20 acres just outside of the city upon which about a dozen of us fly. The property also has a canal that surrounds it providing other RC opportunities. We have a decent grass runway for the planes, and rows of saskatoon berry bushes to race the quads through. He has also accumulated a vast array of RC gear over the years and is quite generous if one needs a certain something. Hopefully this Arrow will show my deep appreciation.

On a more selfish note, I enjoy building, perhaps more so than flying, and I like having the opportunity to go big without having to buy the expensive stuff (batteries, ESC's, motors, fans, etc.) This way for the price of some foam and balsa, I can build and see this bird fly.


Having a successful maiden of the smaller version, I am excited to begin the larger version. Will start with the wing, yesterday I made up the template for the foam wing cores, and picked up the foam, and some balsa this morning. I will need to make a longer wire bow but should have cores cut later this evening.
Like the smaller version, the wing will be done in one cut, the stepped portion will be cut loose and spaced out to recreate the midwing notch and step. Will have pics tomorrow, if all goes well.

WING

Sept 4 (2 1/2 hours),
Wing will not be done in one cut, The outline of the cores was cut out, the template screwed in place, one end of the bow was stationary at the wing tip while the wire followed the root template. My power supply was having trouble heating the 5' wire, but the super slow pace made beautiful cuts inboard, the tip however suffered severe burnout making the out board section unusable. Salvaged the inner panels but the outer panels will need to be cut separately.

Sept 5 (2 hours),
Made up new template for root at wing notch and cut out two outboard panels. Still a significant burnout at the tips, but this is accommodated by increasing tip thickness and sanding. With a 45" ish wingspan, I really had no perception of this things size, now with the panels cut and laid out, one gets a sense of how big this plane will be.

Sept 8, 9, (12 hours)
Created the wing notch details, cut triangular stock and glued to leading edges. Made up control surfaces, foam sandwiched between 1/16" balsa sheeting. Wing panels sanded to shape and ready for sheeting, but I think I will set aside for a while and work on something else to keep things interesting.
Had the opportunity to show off the wing to Adrian and the boys. Picked up servos, control horns, and hinges from Adrian and a bit of cash to offset my balsa costs, balsa seems to have gone down in quality and up in price.

Sept 16, (2 hours)
Glue on wingtips. Cut servo bays into rear of wing for elevators and ailerons. Run plastic straw in wing to provide routing, and make servos removable if one should fail. Grooves cut for spars.

Sept17, (2 1/2 hours)
Glued the wing halves together with the necessary droop, would have liked to sheet each separately and join but that would make putting in the spars more challenging and not as secure. Cut spars from cedar and fit to wings, glue in place. The front spar on the top needed to have a curve laminated into it to fit properly, because of the Arrow's droopy wings the bottom spar did not require lamination.
A bit of sanding and the wing is ready to sheet.

Sept 18, (1 1/2 hours)
Picked up a a few pieces of denser balsa to sheet across the center section of the wing, with the wing being so thin this should add some strength. I sprayed some contact adhesive along the center joint and laid down a 2" strip of glass. Four 3" sheets, alternating top and bottom, hoping alternation will help maintain the wings true-ness, so far it has remained straight.

Sept 19, (3 hours)
Still straight, the majority of the wing is now sheeted, just the leading edges and a small piece in the tail to complete. Much of the time spent fitting sheeting, gluing together sheets, and waiting for glue to dry.

Sept 20, (3 hours)
Last of sheeting completed. Cleaned up the trailing edge, the equipment pod, wing slot, cut out servo bays, and sanded out the rougher areas. Wing came out straight and light, did a weigh in 5.5 lbs, still have covering, canopy, control rods, and glue adding to that figure so it will probably break 6 lbs but not by much.

Oct 22, (3 hours)
Install bottom to radio compartment, and finish sheeting front bottom of wing. Cut out radio compartment covers.

Oct 23, (3 hours)
Finish up compartments, finish mating surfaces between front of wing and fuselage, drill out holes for hold down dowels in wing.

Oct 24, (3 hours)
Mark hold down dowel holes in fuse, drill slightly lower to ensure tight fit. Glue in wing dowels. File holes in fuse until snug fit between fuse and wing. Tie hardpoints in fuse for wing bolts into fuse with bamboo skewers to spread out load. Drill holes in wing, paying careful attention to alignment, hardpoints, being quite small do not allow for much error.

Oct 25, (2 hours)
Work on vertical stab, glue in three carbon rods for support, and drill wing to suit. Adjust fit of stab and fairing.

Oct 31, (1 hour)
Clean up servo holes in wing. Fill imperfections.

Nov 1, (3 hours)
After much dismay about where to mount the rudder servo in the wing, I found a spot on the the rear deck of the fuse behind the wing, that will just barely accommodate the rudder servo. and resolve the issues I encountered in placing it in the wing.
Most of the final sanding completed on wing, wing and control surfaces contoured for smooth transition, leading edges sanded to shape (may require a few touch ups to maintain a consistent profile.
Last edited by foamnpacktape; Nov 02, 2018 at 08:25 AM.
Aug 28, 2018, 12:34 PM
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FUSELAGE

Sept 11, (2 1/2 hours)
Setting the wing aside for a bit, I moved on to the front end of the aircraft. I cut out some scale images of the nose of the aircraft for reference, unfortunately, the scale was off and I wasted a couple of hours on a nose that was not deep enough. Attempts to salvage it wasted another hour before I finally abandoned it and started again.

Nose was cut freehand from a block of foam, and sanded to shape. I was going to sheet with balsa like the wing, but it will be easier to just glass. Lightweight spackle was used to smooth out the blemishes in the foam as it is essential to lay the glass on a pristine surface. Every little imperfection will show up once glassed. One coat of spackle applied and sanded, applied the second this morning, and it will probably need one more.

Sept 12, (4 hours)
Aaaargh, Second attempt at nose also a bust. Sanded and glassed, upon inspection although the glassing went well, one contour was a bit off. Relatively minor and unnoticeable but for close scrutiny, but I will see it every time I look at it. Frustrated, second attempt flies across garage.
Third time is the charm, cut and sanded in halves to ensure symmetry, halves glued together and final contouring complete. I found a cooler with hard dense EPS, used this for the third nose. This is harder and firmer than the last even once glassed, I am going to simply cover this nose with econocote and call it done. (edit: upon reflection have decided to sheet nose section as well.)

Began cutting pieces for the box section and intakes directly behind nose section, the plan is to build this section and the tail exhaust section, and later attach to the open topped, center fuselage section to which the wing will be bolted. This will become clearer as the build progresses.

Sept 13, (3hours)
Finished roughing out the front fuselage section, Simply a box structure Sides were hollowed out using templates and a hot wire.

Sept14-16, (12 hours)
Completed roughing out the center fuselage section. Simple three sided box, Cut a strip off each foam wing cradle and glue to fuselage to serve as bed for wing on fuselage. Two circular holes cut in block to create fan mount, glued in place in rear of center fuselage with wood reinforcements to bolt down fans. Center fuselage glued together, transitions to fans glued in place and sanded.

Sept 21-23, (9 hours)
Cut, sanded, and sheeted vertical stab including rudder. Once sheeted rudder was cut free. Tailcones were cut in four pieces with hot sire and then glued together to form cones. Was having difficulty envisioning and translating aft section and cones to foam, so much time was spent daydreamin about how to approach it, still haven't got it figured out but I am getting closer.

Sept 24, (3 hours)
Put some time into the tailcone section of the plane, trying to visualize and recreate using only the plans is nearly impossible, images help also but here the scale model helped tremendously. I still have to cut and fit the piece between the tailcones, do a bit of contouring of the exhaust path, and then the fuselage will be ready to sheet with balsa.

Sept 25, (4 hours)
Glued on the tailcones and roughed out the tail area and did a bit of work on getting the wing saddle to fit snugly and in alignment.

Sept 26 -29, (4 hours)
Did some work on the interior routing of the exhaust, glued on the forward section of the fuselage, and hinged all the control surfaces.

Oct 3, (2 hours)
Worked on transition from fuse to wing, and did a preliminary balance. to get correct balance point battery is going to have to reside far further ahead than first thought, into the nose section of the aircraft. This presents two issues: with the battery in the nose it will require more reinforcement, and the compartment in the wing is oversized compromising the strength of the wing without cause. More complexity, more thought, more work.

Oct 9, (8 hours)
Hurt my back last week shoveling snow, so progress has been a bit sluggish. Began sheeting the front end. Sheeted both inside and outside of the intakes, and capped. The resulting structure is amazingly strong. Sheeting the nose was a bit more complicated with its compound curves, most of it is complete with the exception of a couple of square inches at the nose, will finish it up tonight and then it can be mated to the rest of the fuse. Covering the middle of the fuse will be straightforward and quick but the tail area is going to take time, patience, and many small sticks to complete. Hoping to have the plane completely covered before Sunday rolls around, then all that remains is some interior ducting, covering, and equipment installation, the end is near although still many hours away.

Oct 10, (4 hours)
Finished up sheeting the nose with the exception of top and bottom which will be sheeted after it is mated to nose for extra strength. filled in gaps with lightweight spackle.
Working my way sheeting down the fuse, soaked a couple of pieces of balsa to form the edges of the lower fuselage, formed over a broomhandle and then taped to hold shape while the dried. Once dry glued to fuselage with white glue, and well taped to secure until the glue cures. Pulled the tape off the fuse this morning, stiffened up the fuse considerably.

Oct 11, (2 hours)
More spackling of the nose and sanding, one more application and it will be nearly flawless. Sand and glue balsa edges on mating surfaces between nose and fuse. Did some more sheeting on the fuse, all that remains is the aft section.

Oct 12-14, (8 hours)
More sheeting of aft section, nearly completed, some spackling and sanding to finish up the fuselage sheeting.

Oct 15, (3 hours)
More work on sheeting the tailcones, sanding and blending. tail cones and tail capped with balsa, a few small pieces of balsa remain to be attached to the tail piece, and the aft is done. Significant amount of time spent on this area, nice to see an end to all that cutting, contorting, fitting and refitting the sheeting.

Oct 16 (3 hours)
More work on the aft section including some more on the internal ducting. Filling in some minor flaws in the sheeting. Nose section glued to main fuselage and sheeted where they come together. When the wing is on there is no evidence that this is a foamy at heart, every surface covered in beautiful balsa, always a shame to cover it with opaque film.

Oct 17 (2 hours)
Internal ducting, and created some hard points for the wing to be screwed to in the back, will use dowels to hold down the front. The plan is to make the fans accessible by removing the wing, but not without some effort and cutting through some silicone bonding between the wing and fuse.

Oct 20 (8 hours)
Cut canopy and top deck fairing from foam and covered in balsa, Cut fairing for sides of vertical stab from balsa. shape and sand. Fairing complete to rear of stab. If all else fails balsa canopy section can be used as is, but the plan is to use it as a form for a clear plastic canopy, probably more trouble than its worth, wont be much to see through the glass, maybe the top half of the pilots' heads.

Oct 21, (2 hours)
Sand, fit, and fill upper deck fairing. Make up fairing from vertical stab to tail.

Oct 22, (1 hour)
Cut out notch in upper deck fairing, scale detail.

Oct 26-28, (10 hours)
Cut out battery compartment and line with balsa, Work on cover, and fitting, including canopy and fairing. Cut wires for fans, and cut out center line piece in fuselage to separate right and left ducts, install channel to accept fan wires. Ended up not liking the fit and the channel will be on the tight side, likely toss out what I have so far and start again, only a couple of hours lost.

Oct 29, (3 hours)
Re-cut duct divider, make square balsa "tube" from scraps to provide routing for fan wires, and glue into foam divider. Divider then glued into fuselage.

Oct 30, (2 hours)
Check fuse for imperfections, and fill.

Oct 31, (1 hour)
Sand fuselage, ready to cover. Check and touch up canopy and fairing, ready to cover, Size rudder and glue on end caps, sand rudder and vertical stab, ready to cover.

Nov1 (hour)
Cut out bay for rudder servo in rear deck, and fit.
Last edited by foamnpacktape; Nov 05, 2018 at 09:30 AM.
Aug 28, 2018, 12:34 PM
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Final Construction, Covering, Details, and Maiden

Nov 2-4, (12 hours)
Begin covering. Final fill and sand. Cover fairing and vertical stab, glue in rudder hinges and install. Cover tail section of fuse.
Cut out cheater holes in fuse sides.

Nov 5, (3 hours)
Make up upper and lower plates for cheater hole, cover and glue in place. Sand and finish cheater hole. Cover fuselage up to intakes. Make up and cover vanes for cheater hole.

Nov 6, (3 hours)
I had not planned on including the air diverter that hangs below the fuse at the intakes, as they seemed like good candidates to get ripped of belly landing. However, the need to have an air source for the battery compartment can be accommodated with that little scale detail. Air will be gathered from under the diverter and channeled in to cool the battery. Slot cut in compartment and area covered leaving voids where diverter will be glued. Finish covering fuselage.

Nov 7, (2 hours)
Work on air diverter, channels created to direct airflow to battery compartment.

Nov 8, (3 hours)
Finish up cheater hole louvers and glue in place. Diverter air channels created, pieces covered and glued to fuse. Transition at top still needs to be done, this section left uncovered to accommodate.

Nov 12, (18 hours)
Finish up diverter, transition into fuse. Drill out cooling holes in back of battery compartment.
Finish up wingtips, fill and sand wing. Covering, got most of it done Sunday morning, but ran out of white Monocote. Only hobby shop open had none. Had to wait until Monday and hope Model land might be open on this long weekend, they were. While waiting, covered control surfaces and installed, sealed hinge gaps. Installed wing and made adjustments to fit with fuselage.
Adjust fit of canopy and fairing, install magnets to secure.
Finish up last of covering.
Airframe complete, next installing radio and powertrain, details and decals.

Nov 13, (2 hours)
Picked up a pack of four waterslide decal papers and a can of spray to waterproof. Supposed to be able to print with inkjet, didn't work, ink pooled, one sheet gone. Asked Chelsea at work to run a couple of copies through their lazer copier, and she ran in black and white, oops, two more sheets gone. For the last one, lazer printer was having issues getting the ink the toner to stick, with some finding its way to where it shouldn't be. $15 and nothing to show for it.
Usually just print on paper and seal with clear tape like the Arrow one from this thread. I wanted something a bit more slick for this one, but might have to go back to my old method, works pretty well.

Nov14, (2 1/2 hours)
Stopped by Staples copy services and had the girl there put my images on full sheet label material. Got a can of clear spray paint and sprayed down a test piece to waterproof the label which is paper based. The final product turned out well, tonight when I get home I can apply them.
Got home, pulled out the new decals, and found one glued to the sheet next to it, clear coat wasn't completely dry, arrrgh. Water and some careful rubbing removed the stuck on paper and residue. Cut out decals and applied. Paint area inside intakes black.
Talked to the owner of the hobby shop while returning the unused decal binder, and he offered to take the decal paper back as well, so I only lost time not money on the decal fiasco.

Nov 15, (3 hours)
Decals over servo bays were carefully warmed up and removed quite easily, then set aside. Cut covering out of servo bays and seal edges. Solder extensions to servos for starboard side. Fishing the wires through the straws to the radio compartment was tight but manageable. Glue in servos starboard and recover area. Re -apply decal.

Nov18, (8 hours)
Finished servo installation, installed fans and ran wiring to ESC compartment. Added red LEDs to tailcones, came out a bit on the pink side but steps up the cool factor none the less. Made up some fake landing gear for static display, installed magnets in wings and fuse to attach. Took the aircraft out to Adrian's yesterday to show it off, cold and raining so there were only the four of us their, got in a few flights when the rain would let up.

Nov 20, (3 hours)
Routed the battery cooling duct past the battery strap location. Glued in battery tiedown strap. Install control surface horns and pushrods on wing.

Dec 9, (5 hours)
Haven't worked much on it lately, put it on the roof the the LHS for about a week so everyone could have a look at it. Glued the Vertical stab to the wing, sealed the fans and wiring, and installed the ESC's in the wing, and soldered connections. Took it out to Adrian's where it now hangs in its new home. Atached the wing and ran up the motors. Be a while before maiden, still a few things to take care of:

Dec9 , (212.5 hours)


Airframe expenses to date:
Balsa $130,
Hinges $5,
Glue $40,
Foam $20.
Covering $90
Control rods $10
Wiring $30
Misc $20

Total parts= $345.00. Does not include radio and power train. ($600), Approx total: $1000.00


Nov 7 To Do:

Finish up fuselage (12 hours);
Two pushrods need to be redone,
Longer screws in a couple of control horns,
Black lines atop wing need to be added,
Pitot tube needs to be added,
Receiver needs to be hooked up and radio programmed.
Fall away gear needs to be completed.

Approx 12 hours.


Total time estimate: 224.5 hours,
Last edited by foamnpacktape; Dec 11, 2018 at 11:51 AM.
Aug 29, 2018, 06:13 PM
James L
TANGOSIERRAROM's Avatar
Looks interesting but the arrow always does.
Aug 30, 2018, 11:13 AM
Build it, don't buy it
foamnpacktape's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANGOSIERRAROM
Looks interesting but the arrow always does.
Interesting story behind it too, I find it surprising that it is not modeled more often commercially. Plastic model kits were available but have long since been abandoned, more recently Hobby King offered a nice ship with fiberglass fuse, but that has been discontinued.
Not enough demand I guess, but sitting here looking at her, I can't understand why not everyone would want one, she is so sleek and sexy.

She is now complete and ready for Maiden.
Last edited by foamnpacktape; Oct 23, 2018 at 09:42 AM.
Aug 30, 2018, 01:12 PM
Registered User
Personally, I would love to get a set a plans. Also on my hit list: BAC TSR-2, A-5 (A3J) Vigilante, and the B-58 Hustler. Good Luck with the maiden.
Aug 30, 2018, 09:47 PM
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foamnpacktape's Avatar
Thread OP
Thank you dll.
Aug 30, 2018, 10:10 PM
Build it, don't buy it
foamnpacktape's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksqm
Personally, I would love to get a set a plans. Also on my hit list: BAC TSR-2, A-5 (A3J) Vigilante, and the B-58 Hustler. Good Luck with the maiden.
Thank you,

For most of my measurements, and angles, I scaled up this image:

http://www.avro-arrow.org/images/arc...ore/arrow2.gif

The wing is thicker, yet still a relatively thin symmetrical airfoil.
Sep 01, 2018, 03:42 PM
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Just found a decent set of plans here:
http://www.the-blueprints.com/bluepr...05-arrow-2.png
Sep 02, 2018, 08:16 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
Every Canadian should see this movie:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Arrow
Sep 02, 2018, 08:54 PM
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foamnpacktape's Avatar
Thread OP
Yes, good movie, IIRC in the end they fly away with one before the demolition begins, wish that were true.

We have this going on at a small airport about 20 minutes from my home, piloted 60% version:
http://www.avromuseum.com/spec-sheet.html


Maiden today

Wind was calm, a light toss and it climbed out at about a 45 degree angle, cut to 1/2 throttle at about 75' and I flew a few circuits. Very difficult to tell the top from the bottom and easy to lose orientation if your not paying attention. Flies well at very low speeds at just under 1/2 throttle, move to full throttle and it picks up speed rapidly. It is big and light so it is somewhat limited in its top speed, but I would estimate a respectable 50-60mph.
Center of gravity was a bit back, so control was oversensitive, but most surprising was the rudder. The slightest rudder deflection would drop a wing 90 degrees in a heart beat.

I have since moved the CofG forward 3/8", which should make for a more solid platform.

Will try to get some video uploaded soon.
Sep 03, 2018, 12:06 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by foamnpacktape
Yes, good movie, IIRC in the end they fly away with one before the demolition begins, wish that were true.

We have this going on at a small airport about 20 minutes from my home, piloted 60% version:
http://www.avromuseum.com/spec-sheet.html


Maiden today

Wind was calm, a light toss and it climbed out at about a 45 degree angle, cut to 1/2 throttle at about 75' and I flew a few circuits. Very difficult to tell the top from the bottom and easy to lose orientation if your not paying attention. Flies well at very low speeds at just under 1/2 throttle, move to full throttle and it picks up speed rapidly. It is big and light so it is somewhat limited in its top speed, but I would estimate a respectable 50-60mph.
Center of gravity was a bit back, so control was oversensitive, but most surprising was the rudder. The slightest rudder deflection would drop a wing 90 degrees in a heart beat.

I have since moved the CofG forward 3/8", which should make for a more solid platform.

Will try to get some video uploaded soon.
Thanks for the link. Here's a nice model from the site:

Avro Arrow Model Test Flight 2 (6 min 34 sec)
Sep 03, 2018, 12:16 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
And the full size replica:

techlife: Avro Arrow model ready for public (2 min 20 sec)


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