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Aug 29, 2018, 03:19 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsabird
Another option for the tail surfaces is a laminated outline. Not as difficult as it may seem first blush. All you need is some 1/16" strips the same width as the original wood parts' thickness, a way to soak them in water for a while, some glue and a form. I usually use foamboard as sold at some arts and crafts stores. Comes in a 3/16" thickness or so, and cuts readily.
I love laminated outlines and use them whenever appropriate - like on the Cadet tail in previous post, but it is just that I don't feel that the basically square cornered shape of the Aeromaster's tail surfaces lend themselves particularly to this technique and assembling them from strip is the better option here.
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Aug 29, 2018, 05:53 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
I think I agree with George here, although I'm now actually quite well equipped for laminating, as I've acquired a couple of 'robot' tracks with which I can make most shapes. The squared-off nature of this 'plane makes more sense of the 'strip' method, though. I'll probably be tracing it out this afternoon or evening, and will decide then. Ease of manufacture and robustness of result are the main factors; certainly higher on any list of criteria than elegance, of which I'm a lousy judge in any case..!
Aug 29, 2018, 04:27 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
I've decided to have a coulpe of dowel 'studs' at the fore of the hatch, and a couple of magnets at the rear. The balsa former won't be strong enough for studs, so I'm 'recycling' the ply engine bearer excess as dowel reinforcing. A bit of thinking is required to jury-rig a clamping system (no lump hammers here..!) ...



A wider view; all the stringers are now fitted ...



Some while later ...

The central backbone stringer has been cut through, as have the arches; the hatch comes free, as planned..!



I've put it to one side for now, as I've started the tailplane. Here's the first pieces...



... and all the surround, complete...



There'll be a diagonal structure in the empty spaces, once the surrounds have been glued up.
A question, whilst I'm here: the plan calls for 1/8 x 1/4 hardwood pieces along the inside edge of each elevator...



Any idea as to their function..? Are they indispensable..? Thanks in advance for any light thrown upon this.
Aug 29, 2018, 05:47 PM
Experienced Balsa Mangler
Those hard edges are cross-grain with the elevator to "prevent" warping. Having a similar strip on the opposite edges (outermost edges) of the elevator would help, too. I've seen this in other model designs, with this explanation given. Old kits didn't always have the best possible balsa selection, and large pieces tended to warp with humidity.

Using a framed elevator, like you show in the photos, should eliminate the need to add these strips. Your inner and outer edges are already oriented "cross-grain" to the width of the elevator.

Additionally, those inside edges are the ones the rudder might "contact" with if the throw is too much...
Last edited by cpmcgraw; Aug 29, 2018 at 05:57 PM.
Aug 29, 2018, 06:08 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
That all makes sense; thanks for that. With my Udet Flamingo, there was, indeed, a real risk of rubbing between full rudder and up elevator (since eliminated...); I would think that this kit should not have such a possibility, but that'll be checked once it's hinged. I've left room for these strips, but I think I'll leave them out, unless new information comes to light. Cheers.
Aug 29, 2018, 07:57 PM
Registered User
Hey Douglas,
Just caught your build, nice work so far! I have this kit in my stash and will be following along, good stuff you got going on
Brian
Aug 30, 2018, 04:10 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Thanks, Brian. Hope this helps when you get round to building your kit.
Aug 30, 2018, 05:58 AM
Blueplaidcanard flyer
Looks to be about 2" of total rudder throw without the rudder rubbing the V cut out.1" throw per side will be plenty.
Aug 30, 2018, 06:51 AM
So I'M meant to be in control?
Colonel Blink's Avatar
Evidently a bit late now, but when I build a hatch in the way you are doing it, I tend to sandwich a piece of 1/64" or even 1/32" ply between the hatch former and it's equivalent on the fus - because you may find that once there is the 'foldover' of the covering on each, the hatch ends up a very tight (or impossible) fit. Especially if (like me) sometimes the foldover sections end up each as more than one layer of covering.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpmcgraw
Those hard edges are cross-grain..... etc
Hi Craig - good to see you back! Going to mangle some balsa with the rest of us any time soon?
Aug 30, 2018, 08:47 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Blink
Evidently a bit late now, but when I build a hatch in the way you are doing it, I tend to sandwich a piece of 1/64" or even 1/32" ply between the hatch former and it's equivalent on the fus - because you may find that once there is the 'foldover' of the covering on each, the hatch ends up a very tight (or impossible) fit. Especially if (like me) sometimes the foldover sections end up each as more than one layer of covering.....


Hi Craig - good to see you back! Going to mangle some balsa with the rest of us any time soon?
I even go a bit further as I include 1/16" spacers between the hatch former and it's fuselage counterpart, then give a very light sanding to the hatch formers when the hatch is first removed and then face both hatch and fuselage formers with 1/32" ply. This gives a nice fit after covering and provides a hard edge to both hatch and fuselage cut-out.
Aug 30, 2018, 08:53 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Blink
Evidently a bit late now...
Looking closely at the photo, you may be able to make out the folded plastic sheet between the original cowling formers and the new hatch end formers. This was to prevent the gluing in of the hatch stringers from 'accidentally' gluing the hatch to the cowling formers, but also to act as a spacer of sorts, for just the eventuality you evoke. The 'plane will be covered with 30 laminating film and Esaki tissue, in much the same way as the Flamingo; with any luck, any overlap around the edges will be very thin. At 'worst case', I could still rub down the hatch ends a little, if I sense that it'll be a tight fit, and, as a last resort, there's always the lump hammer.
A pertinent observation, just the same; thanks for that.
Aug 30, 2018, 04:52 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Here's the tailplane, mostly pinned up...

]

... and now all glued, ready to be shaped up. The hinge positions are marked out while it's still one piece



To the right are the original pieces supplied in the kit. I've weighed both, and there's a 30 gr difference (26 built up, 56 original, without the tips...). A difference worth having..? I don't know, but it's as much fun building mine as gluing up the other planks. I'll try to remember to join the elevators before separation, too.
Next up is the tailfin and rudder. I'll probably innovate there, too, as I like to be able to slot the fin into the tailplane, so I think I'll extend the fin further down.
Aug 30, 2018, 09:48 PM
Experienced Balsa Mangler
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Blink
Hi Craig - good to see you back! Going to mangle some balsa with the rest of us any time soon?
Hmmmmm... Might be, might be. Working on a kit now (Sig J-3), and getting the itch to 'scratch' with each of these build threads I peek into. This Aeromaster has long been on my list of 'wanna-dos', so I'm paying attention. The J-3 is being 'back-dated' to the original 1955 plan just a bit, and I'm going to ePower it instead of wet-burn. Doing a plug-in wing configuration to return the cabin roof area to the fuselage instead of that one-piece bolt-on set up that Sig used. It makes for a good practice round.
Aug 31, 2018, 02:09 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad3353
To the right are the original pieces supplied in the kit. I've weighed both, and there's a 30 gr difference (26 built up, 56 original, without the tips...). A difference worth having..?
I should say so Douglas, 30 grams at the back equates to 90 at the front. "Lighter models fly better" (and crash more slowly!) You will just need to watch that you get the lipo in the right place, wouldn't want to spoil things by it ending up NOSE heavy!!
Aug 31, 2018, 02:38 AM
'Douglas' to his friends.
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundancer
...wouldn't want to spoil things by it ending up NOSE heavy!!
I should be so lucky..!
With the installation of the 'floor' inside the fuselage, moving the battery forward and back should not be a problem. I'd much rather have the choice of sliding it back than having to extend the nose..!
Last edited by Dad3353; Aug 31, 2018 at 05:19 AM.


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