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Apr 30, 2018, 11:31 AM
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Help with Eflite Radian 2.0 Basic BNF


Hello to all and thank you for any advice in advance.
I am beginner to intermediate flyer, used to have the Super Cub and flew it regularly, then took a break from hobby and now just wanted to really have something more relaxing and purchased the Radian 2.0 and a Spectrum dx6e.

Went out for maiden flight today in a community park at 6am (per recommendations from hobby store that even for the experienced, first time sail plane should not be flown over ocean till you get used to it)... I thought this was going to be a no brainer, but it never took flight, just crashed.

The trim was fine, the motor was on full power, but it just never went up just came down after a few feet.
Battery is all the way forward as they recommend... there was ZERO wind, is that the problem? Or something else I am missing?

Does this plane need SOME wind or did I just not give it enough elevator?

Also, is there any kind of way to "Train" myself on the spectrum since I am new to that radio (First time with a "Real" radio) to simulate flying the Radian on a computer?
Last edited by bfiddlefly; May 17, 2018 at 11:17 AM.
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Apr 30, 2018, 12:41 PM
Sagitta Fanboy
Battery should be shoved as far back as it can get in the compartment in my experience.

All the way forward results in it being nose heavy to the point where you have no elevator authority.

Did you check CG? With battery installed (but not connected) make sure the CG is at the listed position (63mm or 2.5" from the leading edge of the wing). Adjust battery location to get that CG and mark it. That's already a fair bit nose heavy, but quite flyable. That should have the battery midway back in the compartment.

Best way to train is to find a local club and join.
Apr 30, 2018, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by mawz View Post
Battery should be shoved as far back as it can get in the compartment in my experience.

All the way forward results in it being nose heavy to the point where you have no elevator authority.

Did you check CG? With battery installed (but not connected) make sure the CG is at the listed position (63mm or 2.5" from the leading edge of the wing). Adjust battery location to get that CG and mark it. That's already a fair bit nose heavy, but quite flyable. That should have the battery midway back in the compartment.

Best way to train is to find a local club and join.
Thanks so much, I will try battery all the way back, see if that helps.
I did NOT check CG, rookie mistake? I have to say the fact that the wings have to be taken off and on , is not something I calculated as to the pain of flying this thing, but hopefully will be worth it, I will put wings on and check the CG before the next flight.
Apr 30, 2018, 01:22 PM
Registered User
Gratter's Avatar
One of the guys at the field even has some lead on the tail to get the cg were he likes it.
Apr 30, 2018, 01:29 PM
Sagitta Fanboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gratter View Post
One of the guys at the field even has some lead on the tail to get the cg were he likes it.
Yeah, the CG range is pretty huge and manual CG is right at the front end of it.

I've heard of folks flying it with CG aft of 90mm. But I'd not recommend that for a new pilot.
Apr 30, 2018, 01:33 PM
Sagitta Fanboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfiddlefly View Post
Thanks so much, I will try battery all the way back, see if that helps.
I did NOT check CG, rookie mistake? I have to say the fact that the wings have to be taken off and on , is not something I calculated as to the pain of flying this thing, but hopefully will be worth it, I will put wings on and check the CG before the next flight.
The key thing is CG in this case.

too far forward and the aircraft will porpoise and the elevator will be ineffective, it will also have trim issues between power on and power off.

too far back and the elevator will get extremely sensitive (aft of a certain point, known as the neutral point, and you'll find the aircraft is totally unstable and you will chase the elevator just to maintain level flight)

For a relative beginner a little forward is a good idea, as it keeps the aircraft stable enough that it will seek level flight. The CG in the manual for the Radian is right around the correct spot for the beginner.

Note for gliders, I always recommend a hand-toss before the first serious launch just to check handling.
Apr 30, 2018, 01:36 PM
Registered User
tkallev's Avatar
Always best to get experienced help with a new model and new pilot ...
Apr 30, 2018, 03:20 PM
Registered User
tspeer's Avatar
I'm a newby RC pilot with a Supercub and a Radian, too, but I used to fly freeflight in my youth. So my plan was to trim it with hand launches like I'd do with a freeflight plane before doing powered flights. I put the c.g. at the recommended position and gave it a toss. It flew perfectly in trim - so much so that I had to grab my transmitter to keep it from hitting the trees at the bottom of the airfield.

I'm not flying with the stock prop (I replaced it with an Aeronaut prop and metal spinner because I was leery of the plastic yoke), but I only need maybe half power to climb out at pretty steep angle.

So by all means, balance it as accurately as you can, and be gentle on the throttle until you are comfortable with it.
Apr 30, 2018, 05:42 PM
If it flies - I want one!
Petem's Avatar
All sound advice so far, and should get you started. A couple of additional points:
Virtually all modern electric soarers have a fairly strong pitch-up with power, caused by lots of power and difficulty in building in enough down-thrust on motor mounts in the nose. So be ready to hold the nose down with elevator if you use full power in the climb.
Check the setup of your elevator at neutral - it should be nicely in line with the tailplane, not up or down.
And yes, there are RC simulators available and they certainly do help to get your basic reflexes working - check your local model shop or online retailers for what is available - some come with their own transmitter and some use your Tx through a dongle to a USB port.
Cheers, and enjoy - the Radian is a lovely soarer and an excellent place to start.
PeteM
May 01, 2018, 03:09 AM
Registered User
If the motor was putting out full power, and the plane "came down after a few feet", it would have been cutting up turf and smashing itself to bits. When things are working right, this model will get to 200 meters in 30 seconds or less! In fact, I'd recommend flying it at half throttle until you get used to it. It will still have plenty of climb.

Anyway, if your model came down relatively gently, with the power on, then power is where your problem is. Nonetheless, it's good form to throw the model a bit, not just let it go.

My guess is that your ESC isn't set up correctly, something is wrong with it or the motor, or something like that. I seem to recall that the prop adapter can slip. Was it making funny noises? In addition to making sure the set screw is oriented correctly to the flat on the shaft, and snug, I also have used Loctite. On an earlier one I used CA, because it started to slip in the middle of a contest.

The Radian is quite easy to fly, as long as you remember that most things happen slowly. That is, the rudder won't roll that long wing as fast as ailerons did on your Cub. At full throttle, pitch up and climb happen quickly. There's a video somewhere on line of someone launching the older version of the Radian and inadvertently looping it! The new one, if anything, has slightly more power, and otherwise flies the same.

I shouldn't think you'd have to do anything special about the radio, so if you don't set up any of the bells and whistles, you shouldn't have too much trouble with the new transmitter. Some people, I think mix in a bit of down elevator with the throttle, though I've never bothered.

If you have an RC club near you, go hang around with them until you figure out who knows what they're doing. Not necessarily the hot aerobatics guy. Better if it's someone who seems skilled with similar types of models. Then ask one of these people for help.
May 01, 2018, 09:34 AM
the kitty litter of rcgroups
rdwoebke's Avatar
With a new glider I don't suggest running the motor at all for the first flights. First flights should be power off glide test. Throw the model as flat as possible. Kind of like throwing a dart. You don't need to throw it as hard as you can but give it enough push to get it to flying speed. The model should fly straight away from you and travel about 100 feet or so.

Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons
May 01, 2018, 01:13 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwoebke View Post
With a new glider I don't suggest running the motor at all for the first flights. First flights should be power off glide test. Throw the model as flat as possible. Kind of like throwing a dart. You don't need to throw it as hard as you can but give it enough push to get it to flying speed. The model should fly straight away from you and travel about 100 feet or so.

Ryan
Wow, thank you for all the posts, its been a few years since My SuperCub Days, and I assumed it would just be like riding a bike, but I guess not with a sail plane.

I'll try just throwing it as suggested thank you!
May 01, 2018, 01:19 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by lincoln View Post
If the motor was putting out full power, and the plane "came down after a few feet", it would have been cutting up turf and smashing itself to bits. When things are working right, this model will get to 200 meters in 30 seconds or less! In fact, I'd recommend flying it at half throttle until you get used to it. It will still have plenty of climb.

Anyway, if your model came down relatively gently, with the power on, then power is where your problem is. Nonetheless, it's good form to throw the model a bit, not just let it go.

My guess is that your ESC isn't set up correctly, something is wrong with it or the motor, or something like that. I seem to recall that the prop adapter can slip. Was it making funny noises? In addition to making sure the set screw is oriented correctly to the flat on the shaft, and snug, I also have used Loctite. On an earlier one I used CA, because it started to slip in the middle of a contest.

The Radian is quite easy to fly, as long as you remember that most things happen slowly. That is, the rudder won't roll that long wing as fast as ailerons did on your Cub. At full throttle, pitch up and climb happen quickly. There's a video somewhere on line of someone launching the older version of the Radian and inadvertently looping it! The new one, if anything, has slightly more power, and otherwise flies the same.

I shouldn't think you'd have to do anything special about the radio, so if you don't set up any of the bells and whistles, you shouldn't have too much trouble with the new transmitter. Some people, I think mix in a bit of down elevator with the throttle, though I've never bothered.

If you have an RC club near you, go hang around with them until you figure out who knows what they're doing. Not necessarily the hot aerobatics guy. Better if it's someone who seems skilled with similar types of models. Then ask one of these people for help.
Thank you for this Lincoln, a couple of questions.
It seems to have more than plenty of power, that's why I don't understand why it didn't go up at all, the hobby shop checked everything out and told me it was good to go as far the ESC etc...

I thought I threw it pretty well all three times, but I have to try again, I was so looking forward to the relaxaton of this glider! Maybe I should have started with the UMX first before going "big" ... hopefully I can learn and it was just a fluke , I also will look for the RC field, but around me closest ones are 20 miles away (that allow motor gliders, there are pure soaring clubs only a couple miles, but no motors of any kind allowed)
May 01, 2018, 01:36 PM
the kitty litter of rcgroups
rdwoebke's Avatar
The 2 meter 3 channel Radian is a great glider. It is very relaxing. You will get there with it.

I always suggest unpowered glide throws first because if there are issues with trim or whatever you can sort that out at a slower speed and without the extra variable of the motor to the equation.

Ryan
Latest blog entry: Supergee wing mount pylons
May 01, 2018, 02:06 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwoebke View Post
The 2 meter 3 channel Radian is a great glider. It is very relaxing. You will get there with it.

I always suggest unpowered glide throws first because if there are issues with trim or whatever you can sort that out at a slower speed and without the extra variable of the motor to the equation.

Ryan
Ryan, thank you I should have posted before flying.. glad nothing but a few scratches happened , I should definitely do the throws first, and first CG, then the throws which I'll do so soon as it stops raining in Southern Cali and update this thread.
Last edited by bfiddlefly; May 01, 2018 at 03:16 PM.


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