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Mar 18, 2018, 08:28 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Build Log

Canadair CL-415 / Bombardier 415


For my main log, I created a website: http://www.starbase55.com/cl415/index.html That gives me slightly more freedom to style the pages.

However I will also post here and will link from the site to here as well.

A short recap of the first post on the site: I want to build a CL-415. Found some plans on aerofred and am now trying to work backwards from the plans to a part list.

The plan is in french, and I do not speak French, so I am guessing a bit here and there. Also, I am not native English, and have build mostly from German plans (though I am Dutch). I am thus fairly well traversed in the german terminology, but not the french or the english. Maybe you guys can help me out here.

The plan is 76", all wood.

So far I have seen three types of wood mentioned:

Balsa - Balsa
ctp - I assume this is plywood? - german: sperrholz?
pin - I assume this is pine? - german: kiefer?
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Mar 18, 2018, 07:24 PM
Summit Model Aeronautics
Steve85's Avatar
"CTP" - "contre-plaque" which is indeed plywood
"Pin" is indeed pine

I'll be glad to translate anything you need from French to English. From English to Dutch, you'll be on your own!

Steve
Mar 19, 2018, 01:55 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Thanks a lot Steve, I have some more:

"Les dimensions des lisses sont a prendre sur les encoches des couples."

"Pour le stabilisateur: coffrage intrados extrados en balsa de 1.5mm"

Some parts in the above are obvious, but the meaning of the whole escapes me. (Not just me, google translate as well)
Mar 19, 2018, 02:49 PM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
Just typed - translate french to english - in a Google window and it comes back with a translator.

"The dimensions of the rails are to be taken on the notches of the couples. "

"For the stabilizer: extrados intrados formwork in 1.5mm balsa"

Struggled on the underlined part.
Mar 19, 2018, 03:21 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Yes, I tried the same with the same results.
But to me the translation is gibberish.
I am hoping that a native french model enthusiast can translate it into more meaningful modelling language ;-)
Mar 20, 2018, 10:09 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
In the original design, there is a hole in the front section of the wing on top of the fuselage. Through this hole the battery packs can be accessed. And they will allow for cooling as well.

I would like to put the batteries in a different place, and the hole looks awful. The plane does have overflow holes for the water tanks, which could be used for air circulation exits. But that also means the possibility for water to enter the plane. Not good.

So I am wondering, what other alternatives for battery cooling have people implemented for their seaplanes?
Mar 20, 2018, 11:46 AM
Summit Model Aeronautics
Steve85's Avatar
Sorry for the delay in responding, but not having examined the plan, I believe the designer means the following:

"Les dimensions des lisses sont a prendre sur les encoches des couples."

- Stringer dimensions should be taken from former notches

"Pour le stabilisateur: coffrage intrados extrados en balsa de 1.5mm"

- For the stabilizer, internal and external framework is 1.5mm balsa

Does this make sense when looking at the plan?

Steve
Mar 20, 2018, 12:24 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
The 'stringers' are the reinforcements that run alongside the fuselage? If so, that would make sense.

I am not sure about the 'internal' and 'external' in the stabilizer. That is what throws me of. The stabilizer is a pretty simple construction made from 5mm balsa. No profile. Only the elevator must be wedge-shaped, and it is for the elevator that this line is used. It is clear that the wedge should be covered by 1.5mm balsa on the outside, but I do not know what is meant by the 'inside'.

To be honest, I think I will just ignore it. Cover the outside both bottom and top and be done with it.
Mar 20, 2018, 02:16 PM
Registered User
Frank_K's Avatar
I am not a native French speaker, but as Belgian I can maybe chip in...
“Coffrage” means planking.
No idea on the intrados/extrados part..

Sorry
Frank
Mar 20, 2018, 03:04 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Thanks Frank, that makes sense.
Mar 20, 2018, 03:29 PM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcrien
In the original design, there is a hole in the front section of the wing on top of the fuselage. Through this hole the battery packs can be accessed. And they will allow for cooling as well.

I would like to put the batteries in a different place, and the hole looks awful. The plane does have overflow holes for the water tanks, which could be used for air circulation exits. But that also means the possibility for water to enter the plane. Not good.

So I am wondering, what other alternatives for battery cooling have people implemented for their seaplanes?
Best thing to do is plan a power system that mean your batteries shouldn't get hot, likewise your ESCs.

Don't pack things in foam.

My Sunderland has quite a large fuselage so the batteries and ESC are given plenty of free air, no forced air flow. So yes, keeping water out is important.

Ray.
Mar 20, 2018, 03:36 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
I dislike foam, so no foam in my planes ;-)

The nacelle's on the 415 have a hole below the prop, so I was planning on putting the esc there. But your post does make me aware that I will have to waterproof the inside of the nacelles. I suspect water will find a way, even that high above the waterline.
Mar 20, 2018, 06:21 PM
Oh no, not again!
jhspring's Avatar
Corrosion-X. Generously spray the ESCs with that before each flight and they will shed water like a duck's back. Best to locate them so they don't get direct spray though. With the 415, you have the turbine air inlet below the prop and the large exhausts above the wing. Easy enough to put the ESCs high in the nacelle and duct air over them.

Regards,
Jeff
Mar 21, 2018, 08:32 AM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
Be aware that the recommendation is to extend the ESC to motor wires, not the battery to ESC wires, so ESCs in the nacelles need careful consideration.

A thread for reference --- too long battery wires will kill ESC over time: precautions, solutions & workarounds

All my multi-motor models have the ESCs in the fuselage.

Ray.
Mar 21, 2018, 10:31 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Ray, and I assume that you have no problems with heat?

I do not really have a preference, I am just worried about the heat. However I do not have a big multi motor plane, so I am "trying to find a switch in the dark".
Electronics do not like heat, it kills. Just like the induction problem.

Sooo... probably I should just put them in the fuselage and stop worrying about heat until the first couple of flights and then check for it !!!


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