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Apr 06, 2018, 04:34 PM
Edubarca
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Is Mr. Woolls still around?
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Apr 07, 2018, 01:58 AM
So I'M meant to be in control?
Colonel Blink's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Footrrot
Colonel - you've nodded off again - I posted the Arrowhead earlier #4.
Ah, but you've nodded off again too - I was just proving to our Colombian friend that the plan that you had posted in #4 had been uploaded to Outerzone!
Apr 07, 2018, 02:33 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edubarca
Is Mr. Woolls still around?
I don't know for sure, but given that one would guess his age to be around 40 in the photo which accompanied the Estrellita article - https://outerzone.co.uk/more_pics.asp?ID=1538 - in 1956 it would seem unlikely that he is still with us. But, as with many other great designers of the era, at least his models are still being built and enjoyed.
Apr 07, 2018, 05:30 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
I just woke with a start remembering that I hadn't explained how I did the sliced joints between the lower ribs and te. This is probably teaching many Grannies to suck eggs but butt joints can be very tedious to fit yet are important. So I hope this helps someone.

Uneven gaps cause stresses to develop as glue sets which leads to warps or failure. This method is for when one of the outlines is straight. For instance where a fuselage has a curved lower longeron and straight upper, you fit the uprights to the lower leaving them over length, slice them at the top, then fit the upper longeron. You would use it too for flat-plate tail surfaces . It is very quick and strangely satisfying.

For a good sliced joint you need to align the cutter exactly vertical, accurately over the joint and the cutter must be sharp enough not to tear or crush. For the straight-edge use an aluminium angle to provide a surface to hold the cutter against. Pack it so that the cutter will be vertical.

For the cutter use a segment of blade from a disposable razor. Years ago I stole some from the bathroom cupboard. Each has three blades that are thin and sharp. Also good for trimming covering. Use scissors to cut off a bit about 10mm long and cyano it to an icecream stick that has been cut off square. There you are - all ready.

Put pins around the straight edge so that it won't move. You will quickly get the knack of holding the cutter against the straight edge. Use a slight rocking motion as you cut. Now throw away the cutter! It only takes a moment to make another.

Years ago I read an article, perhaps by Ron Warring, that compared sliced and sanded joints. It came down very firmly on one of them but I can't remember which! My own feeling is that there can't be much difference and butt joins are mainly in compression anyway but still it would be nice to know.
Apr 07, 2018, 06:44 PM
'Douglas' to his friends.
... and breath..! Phew..! Thanks for remembering in time; I was starting to feel faint. I had to read through a couple of times, and imagine the sequence of events, but eventually my dull old brain 'clicked' and I could see clearly what's happening. Jolly good..! Makes sense; I shall surely be trying this out at the next occasion. S'been a long time since I owned a razor of any sort, but I think they're available for coppers, so will try to remember to invest at the next shopping trip.
Good Stuff; thanks for sharing.
Apr 08, 2018, 04:56 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Time to attach the wings to the centre section. For this job it is well worthwhile to get a set of good dihedral guages. Remarkably they are still available at most supermarkets. The standard setting is 50mm which I find suits most of my models including the Estrellita but 15 and 30mm are also convenient. Those adept at mathematics can use the guages in combination to give 45, 60, 65, 75, 80mm and so on.

Fusspots who require some intermediate setting can use the slider feature which allows almost vernier precision. Secure the slider with sticky tape or pins.

As an imaginative marketing ploy the makers include free of charge some truly excellent little fire lighters. Trust me, if you try them you will never go back to rubbing sticks together.

I have no commercial association with this product except as a satisfied user.
Apr 08, 2018, 05:29 PM
Where's the lift?
dgliderguy's Avatar
HA! Glad to see I'm not the only one who grabs whatever is handy for blocking up my wings. I see you label them, and keep them handy for the next job. Very resourceful!
Apr 09, 2018, 12:32 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
No, I don't normally keep them or label them - mainly kidding here.

Though matchboxes are handy.
Apr 19, 2019, 09:33 PM
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Thread OP
Construction on the Estrallita came to a sudden halt shortly after the last post when I damaged my back rather badly in a foolish mishap. However, over the last few weeks I've been getting back to the work-bench a few minutes at a time, and somehow, quite suddenly, progress is apparent. I'll contact Sundancer and transfer to CAP 19.
You can see from the photo that the structure is nearly complete. It was mostly conventional but there are two or three points worth noting which I will cover in the next few posts.
Apr 20, 2019, 12:59 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
I love the Estrallita, glad to hear that you are getting back to building and looking forward to seeing her finished.

PS if possible could you edit the heading in post 1 to say "now CAP2019" (Edit then "Go Advanced")
Apr 20, 2019, 05:21 PM
Edubarca
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What a beautiful rendition of the "Estrellita" with an "e". The Spanish word means "Little Star". I like your modification of ribs and fin. Although I usually dislike modifying structures of classic models, you have done a nice job. Incidentally, it seems Mr. Woolls likes Spanish names. His biplane is called "La Paloma" which means "The Dove". My daughter is called Paloma. You can see her on the profile photo when she was 3. And my Kwik Fli is still around in flying condition, turning 49 this year.
Apr 20, 2019, 10:53 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Edubarca, a lovely name increases the appeal of the Estrallita and your daughter too.

Most of the work I've skipped is very conventional and everyone should be glad that they've been spared a blow by blow account of it. There are a few points that need explanation though. I'll start at the front and work back.

You can see in the photos that I haven't cowled the motor or used the mount supplied with it. I've made the nose-block as per the rubber powered original and drilled a hole for the motor to plug into. A dab of epoxy will hold it in place. Thrust-line adjustment would require surgery of course but I'm fairly confident that the usual smidgin of right and down will be near enough.

Would it be possible to make an outrunner motor that is a spinner as well? Propeller blades would plug in. Multi blades - no problem. Perhaps a spinner made on a 3D printer to clip over an existing motor.
Apr 22, 2019, 09:42 PM
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Thread OP
More catch-up.

The undercarriage is moved back one bay for better ground handling. This gives the added benefit that the relatively massive ply plug-in box is no longer useless dead-weight during flight but can earn its keep securing the leading edge of the wing and the battery - see the little drawing attached. The wing clips under a ply plate and the battery sits on velcro. Fit jobs for such a substantial structure. There is slight assymetry but who cares.

In other respects the undercarriage is rather clever. The plug-in feature is itself worthwhile for ease of finishing and covering, storage and transport, and if repairs are needed. There is room in the box for the whole leg to flex rearward something like the compliance in a car's suspension. And the crossways section of wire acts as a torsion bay enabling each leg to swing back. Swinging back is probably not as good as splaying but I think it will work well enough in practice.
Apr 25, 2019, 07:17 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Still catching up.

A friend of mine started an Estrellita about the same time as mine, for the original rubber power. His is long since finished and flying well. He followed the intended method with the canopy (see GW's drawing attached) and had problems fitting the side panels. We think we know why. The acetate will not form double curves. Although the canopy sides may appear to be single curvature that isn't actually so.

The early designers of plywood boats thought the cross sections would all be straight lines. They quickly discovered their error and learned how to plot developable surfaces, sections of cones and cylinders. The cross sections ended up convex. For the side panels of the canopy to fit, the fore and aft bulkheads probably need convex curvature too.

I"m hoping to avoid the problem by defining the bottom shape of the side windows with 1.5mm balsa so that the acetate only has to conform to two lines, the top frame and the bottom outline. Another solution would have been to continue the trapezoidal shape of the top deck behind the pilot so that the angle of inclination of the sides remained constant but this would have departed quite a lot from GW's look. May have been a nicer shape though.

The canopy frames looked rather prominent on the drawing so I reduced them to 1.5mm square, laminated from spruce.
Apr 26, 2019, 02:20 AM
So I'M meant to be in control?
Colonel Blink's Avatar
That looks really graceful - nice work!


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