1 Tip for New Beginner RC Car/Truck Drivers

Check out this thread to learn tips and tricks about RC Car and Trucks from those with experience. Use it as a resource and be sure to share your knowledge with the group.

Splash

Share Your Best Tips with New Drivers

This time of year we start seeing an influx of newcomers to the hobby visiting RCGroups. Some are finding out about this great hobby for the first time and wanting to soak up as much information as they can before starting their journey. For most of us, we've been doing this for years or decades and as a community, the knowledge we all have is an outstanding resource that should be shared.

I wanted to create a series of these articles for various RC categories so no matter if you got a new airplane, heli, drone, truck or boat, you'll have easy access to some of the best tips and tricks to help you be successful and enjoy your chosen hobby. This article is for RC Cars and Trucks, so please hit the reply button below and share your favorite vehicle related tips and tricks.

I'll get us started with a cool resource you might not be familiar with. While it is possible to learn to drive all by yourself, you are going to have a better chance with the help of an experienced driver. Plus meeting and playing with others who share the same passion as you is way more fun than doing it alone. Use the RCGroups Places Page to locate and find RC car clubs near you and reach out for help. You'll be glad you did.

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Dec 18, 2017, 10:17 AM
Born again RC'er
My #1 tip -
Don't use WD-40 to lube anything! It was designed to help clean, and remove water. While it will work as a lube for a short while, it will soon evaporate, and leave no lube and no rust protection.

WD-40 + Bearings = dead bearings.
Dec 18, 2017, 12:15 PM
Registered User
Matt Gunn's Avatar
My #1 tip would be: it's not all about full throttle. Learn throttle control, when to firewall it and when to feather it. Using throttle sparingly increases run time, causes less carnage on your drivetrain, and adds a level of control and finesse into your driving game.
Dec 18, 2017, 03:39 PM
The Mad Titan
DC1138's Avatar
DON'T GET DISCOURAGED!! It sounds silly, but that's really the best advice I can give. You're going to ask questions and not get the answers you expected. You're going to follow advice that you later regret. Some people will be helpful, others rude or condescending. You're going to make mistakes, break things, order the wrong parts, etc... don't worry about it! 99.9% of the people you run into want to help you. We WANT more people in the hobby so we have more people to talk to about it. But sometimes there are communication issues, or your question may not be as clear/specific as it needs to be to give you a good answer, or people will just misunderstand what you're asking outright and give what seems to be a useless answer. Don't get discouraged! You're going to learn through reading, watching, trial and error and making mistakes. We all did it, we all do it, and people will continue to do it. Trust me, you're going to have a hell of a lot of fun in the end, so don't give up.
Dec 18, 2017, 11:24 PM
Registered User
Hey, these tips sound good Yes, Learning the car by yourself is the best to get experience the various tasks and hurdles comes in your way.

#Tip: Challenge your Hurdles without any fear.
Dec 19, 2017, 12:37 AM
Registered User
You are going to break things. Repeatedly. Learn how to reassemble your car, keep spare parts and get a decent set of tools
Dec 19, 2017, 04:47 AM
Registered User
Tip: Use the internet and research to find answers.
Use the internet to research before you buy or head to your local hobby shop. I found that doing research for dealing with issues or products helps a lot. The guys at the local hobby shop may not have the answer you need or they may point you in the wrong direction. Not their fault really since they have so many products to service and try to be familiar with. The internet and RCG is a great resource for answers. There are other more focused forums as well depending on what you are interested in. Just use the search function and you'll find something to help you out.
Dec 19, 2017, 11:03 AM
Did I make the A Main?
bill_delong's Avatar
My #1 Tip: RTR = Ready To Reassemble... that means you need to be prepared to read your assembly manual and perform regular maintenance on your cars. Most manufacturers will take short cuts by not properly greasing the rubber seals on the diffs and shocks which invariably leak and you will need to rebuild your car to ensure that it's functioning properly. Proper care and maintenance will save you money and frustration by not having to replace worn/broken parts... if something goes wrong or makes a weird sound, then stop immediately and investigate... if you try to ignore a problem, I promise it won't go away, chances are things will only get worse and likely cascade into breaking other parts which can increase your repair costs. Don't be afraid to roll up your sleeves and get your hands greasy
Dec 19, 2017, 02:27 PM
Registered User
Panhead5496's Avatar
One thing I've found the hard way is there are some things you can "cheap out" on, and some things you are better off spending more and getting a better product.

For example, let's say you see a good deal on a relatively unknown servo. If you decide to get it, basically the only risk you run is it won't turn well, strip out, etc.

Now let's say you want to "cheap out" on a lipo charger. Lots more to go wrong here...anything from it not working to burning your house down.

Make sure you spend your money wisely. And if you have 99% of people telling you to get product A, and they all can tell you how well it works, even if it's more money, get that product, not product B that 1% says works well enough
Latest blog entry: Live chat room
Dec 19, 2017, 04:55 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by panhead5496
one thing i've found the hard way is there are some things you can "cheap out" on, and some things you are better off spending more and getting a better product.

For example, let's say you see a good deal on a relatively unknown servo. If you decide to get it, basically the only risk you run is it won't turn well, strip out, etc.

Now let's say you want to "cheap out" on a lipo charger. Lots more to go wrong here...anything from it not working to burning your house down.

Make sure you spend your money wisely. And if you have 99% of people telling you to get product a, and they all can tell you how well it works, even if it's more money, get that product, not product b that 1% says works well enough


+1
Dec 19, 2017, 05:27 PM
Fan of just about anything RC
SoloProFan's Avatar
Applies to pretty much everything RC, when using something for the first time, don't drive, fly, etc in a cramped space. Many beginners crash their first model because they wanted to try it right in front of the house, or on another close by, but not very suitable location. Chosing a location with ample space, allows for correction if some settings are not right, or when the new driver, pilot, etc, needs some time to adjust to the control response of the new purchase. Nothing as frustrating as taking out a new model, and within seconds starting the "walk of shame" to pick up the pieces...
Dec 20, 2017, 10:31 AM
Registered User
kuiperJ's Avatar
I'm starting to become a sucker for these "1 tip" threads

My #1 tip: 1/24 and 1/32 scale rc racing is every bit as fun as 1/8 and 1/10 scale racing and can be done at a fraction of the price.
Dec 20, 2017, 03:05 PM
Registered User
Just have fun!! It's an addiction

And hide all the receipts from the old lady!!
Dec 20, 2017, 04:18 PM
Registered User
Panhead5496's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoloProFan
Applies to pretty much everything RC, when using something for the first time, don't drive, fly, etc in a cramped space. Many beginners crash their first model because they wanted to try it right in front of the house, or on another close by, but not very suitable location. Chosing a location with ample space, allows for correction if some settings are not right, or when the new driver, pilot, etc, needs some time to adjust to the control response of the new purchase. Nothing as frustrating as taking out a new model, and within seconds starting the "walk of shame" to pick up the pieces...
+1!

I would also add that for a first RC, you don't need to have the "go big or go home" mentality, meaning don't feel like you have to get a huge 1/8th monster truck running 6s to have fun. A brushed 1/10 2wd will be plenty of power for someone who is used to "toy grade" RCs, and will let them safely learn the ropes without hurting themselves

Quote:
Originally Posted by kuiperJ
I'm starting to become a sucker for these "1 tip" threads

My #1 tip: 1/24 and 1/32 scale rc racing is every bit as fun as 1/8 and 1/10 scale racing and can be done at a fraction of the price.
Me too. They are very interesting to read through!!

I agree with that too.

1/12, 1/16, ad 1/18 can be a good economical scale as well. My first hobby grade rc was a brushless 1/18 buggy. I still have it sitting on my shelf


One thing to add: I had never even considered this happening before, but when you get a new RC car/truck, I would recommend taking the wheels off before ever turning it on and calibrating the esc/radio. I had a big 1/8 brushless truggy and turned it on to calibrate it with my radio, and for who knows what reason, it decided to go full throttle, in the house! Thank goodness I managed to yank the battery plug out, or it could have been bad. The bigger brushless trucks have a ton of power and could really hurt you should they take off!!
Last edited by Panhead5496; Dec 20, 2017 at 05:07 PM.
Dec 20, 2017, 10:11 PM
Registered User
marmalade1's Avatar
If a part breaks, consider buying two replacements.

PD


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