View Poll Results: How often do you sail?
Weekly 7 36.84%
Average once a month 5 26.32%
Occasionally 3 15.79%
Rarely 3 15.79%
Can't wait to start 1 5.26%
Probably never 0 0%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Oct 08, 2019, 02:35 AM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Thread OP
Knowing how you strive to do a top job, and finish, I'm sure you'l lfind somthing. I have opted to use Bunnings Tasmanian Oak ( eucalyptus) hardwood dowel on all 4 boats.
All have sailed a good number of times so far, and sometimes in heavy going, but there has never been any failure nor any noticeable bend in the masts even with water surging across the decks. My Annie has even thinner spars than the specs, and Gary has already pruned them down from 16mm to 12.5.


Keep in mind that the boats are designed to spill excess wind at around 30 degrees of heel (or so I believe) and the shrouds are more than adequate to take the power of sudden gusts.


Looking forward to what you come up with.
Last edited by robcrusoe; Oct 08, 2019 at 02:45 AM.
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Oct 08, 2019, 04:27 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
Knowing how you strive to do a top job, and finish, I'm sure you'l lfind somthing. I have opted to use Bunnings Tasmanian Oak ( eucalyptus) hardwood dowel on all 4 boats.
All have sailed a good number of times so far, and sometimes in heavy going, but there has never been any failure nor any noticeable bend in the masts even with water surging across the decks. My Annie has even thinner spars than the specs, and Gary has already pruned them down from 16mm to 12.5.


Keep in mind that the boats are designed to spill excess wind at around 30 degrees of heel (or so I believe) and the shrouds are more than adequate to take the power of sudden gusts.


Looking forward to what you come up with.
I am probably worrying about nothing as is my usual case.
To my surprise I found some 16mm pine dowelling and other lesser diameters in a department that I did not know about.
Bunnings...please accept my apologies for putting you down.
" No worries Pete..we look forward to seeing you again sometime".
Yes spruce would have been nice but heck its hard to get now.
I read that you used Tassie oak.
There is plenty in Bunnings but I thought it would be too heavy.
Obviously not as you have used it.
I am making a simple tressle to sit Emma on whilst at the lake and complete with Keel.
You know...I can turn out the most beautiful playing Ukulele but when it comes to making a simple tressle to allow a 22" keel to protrude, I made an utter Horlix of it.
It took me a whole day to master a complete mess.
It is now in the bin in pieces and using the knowledge I gained building it, I went about making a new one with a fresh supply of pine from Bunnings.
It took me two hours start to finish.
Can you admit to messing up the simplest of tasks?
I cannot believe myself for having messed up so badly.
What a prat!
Oct 08, 2019, 09:10 AM
Registered User
Mast hoops can be made from thin wood veneer strips ...

Find a dowel UNDERSIZED for your desired mast ... wrap with plastic trash / grocery bag ... DRY FIT veneer strips wrapped around dowel ... wire in place a day or two ...

Remove wire ... un-wrap veneer ...

RE-WRAP veneer GLUEING as you wrap.
Wire in place ... let dry ... slide dowel out

Stain and install

NOTE: three or four wraps of wood veneer around dowel is more than enough for making great mast hoops
Last edited by slo.ca6; Oct 08, 2019 at 04:16 PM.
Oct 20, 2019, 01:39 AM
Registered User

Autonomously Sailing Around the World


Hey All,

I'm a computer engineer in Boston, MA and I'm looking to build a sailboat that can (eventually!) sail around the world autonomously. What would be some of the challenges be with building a a slightly bigger version of Emma (1.5x) to support solar panels on her deck to power the computer system? Also what would be some of the challenges with sailing in open ocean?

I'm really excited about this project and started a blog site for it: http://www.naovictoria.info

Thanks,
Vorn
Oct 20, 2019, 05:45 PM
Registered User
The biggest problem that I can see is marine growth. A circumnavigation for such a small craft is going to take a loooooong time. Barnacles and weed growth are going to reduce sailing speed considerably as time goes on. Anti-fouling will not keep a hull completely clean. Look at the state of yachts that do circumnavigations and they finish up like a hippies' garden.
Oct 22, 2019, 08:55 AM
Registered User
Have a read of this project. A low profile craft that travelled far but was a journey too far just. Adding a sail rig that is able to with stand the forces of nature on the open seas would be a challenge. Look forward to what you come up with.

http://www.seacharger.com/tracking.html

Something totally different to an up scale Emma.

Autonomous Sailboat Drones Gather Ocean Data (0 min 58 sec)
Last edited by tugboat2011; Oct 22, 2019 at 09:01 AM.
Oct 22, 2019, 04:13 PM
Registered User
Maybe a SEPARATE / NEW thread might be a wise suggestion for such a topic ??

Just saying ...
Oct 25, 2019, 02:10 PM
Registered User

Starting another Emma build


Hello,

Fall is upon us here in Maine, and winter is coming on...

I just received my “Emma” plans, and am looking forward to building the boat in the coming months.

Reading thru the forum has been most helpful, but as this is my first model attempt I’ll have lots of questions .... and some will be really basic. Hope you will bear with me...

To begin, for example, what sorts of easily removable adhesives do folks use to attach the paper plan patterns to the plywood sheets before cutting out the various parts??

Many thanks!
Pete
Oct 25, 2019, 02:33 PM
Registered User
Hi Pete,
I don't like to cut up the plans so I use carbon copy paper to mark the ply. I also like to make up card copies for the hull panels so that i can check the size and shape before cutting the ply.
The trick is to make sure that the plan doesn't shift when copying. With bigger sections you will need to move the carbon sheet ,which is A4 size , between the ply and the plan.
regards
bob
Oct 25, 2019, 03:22 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by slo.ca6
Maybe a SEPARATE / NEW thread might be a wise suggestion for such a topic ??

Just saying ...

I know what you mean, but I think any new thread needs to Gary's OK as too many will make the main subject too spread out.


I don't see any problem with off-topic inclusions, so long as it is only occasional.
Oct 25, 2019, 03:51 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Thread OP

Attaching paper to ply


Quote:
Originally Posted by profitz
Hello,

To begin, for example, what sorts of easily removable adhesives do folks use to attach the paper plan patterns to the plywood sheets before cutting out the various parts??

Many thanks!
Pete

Welcome to a great hobby Pete.


I've tried most variations but now just tile A4 prints together using a pdf program like Adobe Acrobat (there is a free version). then using a box cutter, cut of the actual patterns. But if you have a full plan print then it is either cut it up or print working sections by "tiling".



But to your question re adhesive.Timely asked, since I did this yesterday for a new boat.
Just use a can of aerosol spray adhesive, any craft shop have them. The trick is to just use a light "splatter" on the back of the pattern, it doesn't need as much as permanent adhesion does, and you want it to just hold the paper in place , just. Afterwards, you can either trace around it with a pencil, or simply cut it while still affixed.
Afterwards gently remove the paper, if it is not coming away nicely just heat it a bit with a hair dryer and it will. The little bit of residual adhesive can be cleaned up with a solvent.
However, best you trial your technique out on some scrap ply first.


It has been said before but worth repeating, just cut to the outside of the line (either traced or off the paper) and use a sanding block to take the edge to the line. Don't panic if it goes a bit too far, these boats have an inherent gene that allows for remedial "adjustment".
Oct 25, 2019, 04:54 PM
Registered User
Thanks for the suggestions!

Tracing with carbon paper is certainly an option. But as I already have two full size copies of the plans, courtesy of Thayer’s service, I like the idea of using the spray adhesive (or something similar) and cutting thru one set of the paper plans.

That’s assuming I can stick them down enough to make the cuts, but then not have a mess when it comes time to remove the paper. Using a hair dryer to loosen the “stickem” sounds like a neat trick.....

Thanks!
Oct 25, 2019, 05:41 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Thread OP
Be careful of using carbon paper. I used blue pencil carbon once and the color "ran" with any solvent over it Maybe typing black paper would be better, but really, tracing with a lead pencil gives a very nice visible outline anyway.


Try the spray adhesive, if you do test pieces you will be more than happy with the result. Just keep in mind, it is only really edges that need to be held firm and if you are using either a jigsaw (not a sabresaw!)
or bandsaw, it works fine ,even if all the edge is not affixed. but, give it try.
Oct 25, 2019, 06:27 PM
Registered User
Will do! I’ve got my trusty ancient Black & Decker jigsaw - but new blades!!
Oct 26, 2019, 01:35 AM
Registered User
Hello,
There is also the technique of the iron, for the transfer of the tracing.
Make the photocopy of the drawing, put it face print on the wooden panel and with an iron to heat the copy, the heat transmitted to the copy will print this one on the wood.


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